The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Novi Svijet -- January 07, 1933
    Jugoslav Press and Advertising Information

    We are honored to announce the opening of the information bureau which created a quick connection between Jugoslav newspapers.

    The purpose of this first Jugoslav newspaper office in the United States is to give telegraphic information of economic, political, cultural and social character to the immigrant press, especially to the Jugoslav newspapers. The establishment of cable connections with the new offices gives quick information which serves the needs of the Jugoslav papers in America and the old country. Reports are released to the immigrant press in weekly bulletins or by wire.

    The advertising department receives representatives from immigrant and old country press (cultural, newspaper, and economic reviews) to increase circulation and advertising.

    The information department issues information of economic, cultural and legal character in the United States and Jugoslavia. For Jugoslav Press Advertising and Information Bureau: Andrew Kobal, Marian Pfeifer.

    We are honored to announce the opening of the information bureau which created a quick connection between Jugoslav newspapers. The purpose of this first Jugoslav newspaper office in the United ...

    Croatian
    II B 2 d 1, III H
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 07, 1933
    Chicago or Wilkes-Barre

    The Russian people of Chicago know very well that on Leavitt Street, at the Cathedral, there is a Mutual Aid Society, Russko-Amerikanskoe Pravoslavnoe Obshchestvo Vzaimopomoshchi Sviatogo Kniazia Wladimira, Rapovs, (Russian-American Orthodox Catholic Mutual Aid Society of St. Vladimir). Up to 1918, the above-mentioned society was a branch of the Russian-American Greek Catholic Mutual Aid Society (Rpgkov), but later on, in spite of the large membership and other good qualities of this Society, the "Levitsi" decided not to obey the decree of the assembly of the Rpgkov, which had voted to increase the monthly dues, and they withdrew from the Rpgkov. ["Levitets," singular--"Levitsi," plural; these names are given to the members of the Russian Mutual Aid Society of the Holy Trinity Cathedral Parish at 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Illinois.]

    There was nothing remaining for the Levitsi to do but to organize their own 2mutual aid society and this was done. Everything went along smoothly but then "Prosperity" arrived (unemployment and insolvency of banks). The Black Angel began to visit the members of Rapovs frequently, and the society was forced to do something. It was necessary to unite with someone. Inquiries and investigations were made of all similar societies and finally, after receiving all the required information, it was found that the most suitable organizations for the purpose of merging, were Rnzov (Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society) and Rpgkov (Russian Orthodox Catholic Mutual Aid Society). But here there appears an interesting situation.

    In every organization, there are people with different opinions and our neighbors, the Levitsi are no exception. Those members who were in favor of uniting with Rpgkov strove to convince the rest of the members that there would be more security in joining the above-mentioned society because the organization had seven thousand members (adults), but they purposely suppressed the fact that besides the seven thousand, there were only one thousand two hundred 3young members. They forgot to mention that at the time when they left the said organization, it was because of its instability. They also concealed the fact that in 1926, Rpgkov of Wilkes-Barre established higher rates for the older members. They tried to prove that the aggregate membership must be considered an important factor.

    But to tell the truth, it is necessary to state that this was done chiefly for revenge (against whom? and for what?). Some persons, in order to discredit Rnzov and to press their own point of view, even made such insinuations as the following. They spread a rumor that they had in their hands official records of the instability of the Rnzov. We were told that the chairman of the administration of the Rnzov, upon hearing the rumor, visited the persons supposedly having this information. It appears that they failed to produce any of the official documents that they had bragged about. But these persons knew very well that some of the members were gullible; they openly said of such members: "Show them a piece of paper stating that herein is written so and so and they will believe it." But it appears that even the 4Levitsi, in spite of their piety, are not to be cheated and slandered.

    Let's consider the real facts. The Rnzov as well as the Rpgkov increased the dues to conform with the rates adopted by the Fraternal Congress and, therefore, the financial soundness of each society became about equal. And if you recall that the Rnzov had, for its 1,500 adult members, over five hundred children, in comparison with Rpgkov where for seven thousand adult members there were only 1,200 children, or, in other words, in Rnzov the ratio is three adults to one child, and in Rpgkov it is seven to one, you have the answer, a simple test of the stability of the organization. Every Levitets knows that if there are more older members, more money is required for benefit payments, and, therefore, there will be less stability in the organization.

    And principally, one fact remains certain that those persons who worked so energetically in favor of transferring the membership of the St. Vladimir Society to Wilkes-Barre, are not at all interested in the stability of the 5Society, but are simply trying to cut off the branch on which they are sitting[Editor's note: idiom implying disruptive tactic].

    We Chicagoans, should take care of ourselves. This industrial age ruins a human being's life, and after forty-five years of age the Russian immigrant laborer is left without a bit of bread. Who will take care of him? Chicago or Wilkes-Barre? If we consolidated the Chicago group, we would be able to give bread to our aged. For instance; we could build farms for the aged. Let's say that the Rnzov spent part of their capital to buy land, dividing it into sections and offering the sections to any aged person who wished to work on a farm. The land belonging to the organization would be free from taxes. The organization would co-operate in helping to sell the products of the farm in the city. Many other forms of aid to our members could be organized, but first of all it is necessary that the societies trust one another.

    Our misfortune lies in the fact that within our colony there are people who play the role of pharisees. They pray to God, repeatedly bow in reverence, 6go to confession, donate money and time for the support of the orthodox Catholic faith, but, in reality, they do not believe in the idea that they so loudly proclaim. Christ commands: "Love thy neighbor," but our Chicago Pharisees state: "How can we unite with our brothers? They left us; why should we give them a hand? No, no, never!"

    Therein lies our misfortune. For centuries the doctrine of Christ has been preached, and yet it has not helped to do away with our primitive arrogance. At present we are as far from brotherhood and Christian love as our pagan ancestors were. How can any unbeliever be converted to the Christian faith when he observes such deeds of people calling themselves "Orthodox Catholic"?

    The "red locust" [Translator's note: Bolsheviks], with the purpose of destroying us, attacks Rnzov as well as St. Vladimir, and our Russian "Orthodox Catholics" from Leavitt Street think that they will save themselves if they unite with Rpgkov. They refuse to understand that if Rnzov, St. George's 7Brotherhood and St. George's Parish become victims of the red locust, then there is nothing left for the Levitsi; it would be useless to fight; the only thing to do would be to surrender without struggle.

    It seems that those persons who work so energetically against the consolidation of the Chicago societies, forget the historical precedent of Minin. Hey, you Levitsi! Do you really have the Russian soul and Russian blood in your veins? Are you willing to unite with your brothers Rnzov or will you, as traitors to the Russian cause, silently scamper to Wilkes-Barre?

    Editorial colleagues of Novosti

    [Editor's note: The News, page of Rassviet.]

    The Russian people of Chicago know very well that on Leavitt Street, at the Cathedral, there is a Mutual Aid Society, Russko-Amerikanskoe Pravoslavnoe Obshchestvo Vzaimopomoshchi Sviatogo Kniazia Wladimira, Rapovs, (Russian-American ...

    Russian
    II D 1, III C, I E, I C
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 09, 1933
    Necessity of Just Self-Criticism (With reference to the article by A. G. Alekseev) by A. V. Kravchuk

    "To know the universe enriching us, it is necessary first to know ourselves," said L. N. Tolstoy, the great writer and philosopher of Russia. A. G. Alekseev, in his article printed in Rassviet, on December 27, correctly stated: "The difficulty does not arise from the fact that we have several organizations instead of one, or because we have five or ten newspapers instead of one. The trouble lies within these organizations which do not have a wholesome social life because they do not fix our attention upon the great questions and problems of the contemporary era; because they do not invite us to participate actively in the workers movements."

    Really, the root of the evil is not accounted for by the great number of Russian newspapers or by the existence of several organizations, members of which, at almost every step, are workers. The evil lies within those who are trying 2to create so many big organizations or newspapers. But the main root of evil lies in the ignorance of our leaders, and often in their betrayal of the Russian colony.

    It is understood that only one who was on an intellectually low level, would be permitted to state in public, at an assembly, such a phrase as: "We do not need Rubakin". For forty-five years N. Rubakin has worked for the enlightenment of the working people. Hundreds of thousands have received their education thanks to the system of N. Rubakin.

    The central committee of the organization, ROOV, Russkoe Ob'edinennoe Obshchestvo Vzaimopomoshchi (Russian Consolidated Mutual Aid Society) headed by N. Rubakin, intends to prepare a catalogue to assist self-education among the Russian people in America, but when at the assembly of the ROOV a report was submitted, showing what benefit the catalogue of N. Rubakin on self-enlightenment would bring, one of the delegates arose and asked: "Will we get 3more money from it ? Naturally such an expression hurt those persons who participated eagerly and earnestly in cultural and educational activities for the benefit of the colony very deeply, because nobody thought of protesting or objecting to the question. But we have several such examples.

    The matter of foremost importance was pushed aside. The cultural and educational work has been crippled. The newspaper Rassviet, as the organ of the cultural and educational organizations, which defends and protests our interests, is read by only a few of all those who claim to be leaders. No projects, even though they may be vitally important, receive mass support, and very often expire.

    Therefore we need just self-criticism. But before we start to do anything we must first educate ourselves. We must learn to respect others, to discover sincerity in conversation, in debates, in books. We have considerable time 4for this purpose, and no one will disturb us. Even though our material circumstances are not enviable, still in comparison with other countries, we have every opportunity to begin self-education. For one, the articles of A. G. Alekseev in which he touches many vital questions provocative to all of us, need very serious consideration.

    I, myself, do not quite agree with A. G. Alekseev in everything, but I absolutely support his practical opinion and judgment of life, and for this reason, I salute such an honest social worker as A. G. Alekseev.

    "To know the universe enriching us, it is necessary first to know ourselves," said L. N. Tolstoy, the great writer and philosopher of Russia. A. G. Alekseev, in his article ...

    Russian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II D 1, I A 3, III A
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 09, 1933
    Russian Grocery Store Advertised

    Advertisement of Mr. E. Wagner's Russian Grocery Store, at 1215 N. Damen Avenue. The store dealt in imported Russian food stuffs.

    (Note: This store has been transferred about two years ago to 1172 Milwaukee Avenue. It sells now various other Russian imported goods besides foodstuffs. D. S.)

    Advertisement of Mr. E. Wagner's Russian Grocery Store, at 1215 N. Damen Avenue. The store dealt in imported Russian food stuffs. (Note: This store has been transferred about two years ...

    Russian
    II A 2
  • [Correspondence] -- January 12, 1933
    Correspondence of Mr. P. S. Lambros

    Mr. P. S. Lambros,

    77 20 Sheridan Road,

    Chicago, Ill.

    My dear Mr. Lambros:

    Mr. Roosevelt has asked me to acknowledge your letter of November 11th and to thank you for your word of good will and congratulation. The article which you published in the Greek Star pleased him very much, and he appreciates your offer to cooperate in the task of restoration which lies ahead.

    Very sincerely yours,

    Louis M. H. Moure,

    Secretary, to Mr. Roosevelt.

    2

    It is my desire that "my mail be answered with the greatest possible promptitude.

    The many thousands of letters which have been received since the election and the hundreds which come in every day have made it impossible for me personally to dictate or sign replies. I have, however asked my secretary to answer your letter and I trust that you will understand.

    Very sincerely yours,

    Fr. D. Roosevelt.

    Mr. P. S. Lambros, 77 20 Sheridan Road, Chicago, Ill. My dear Mr. Lambros: Mr. Roosevelt has asked me to acknowledge your letter of November 11th and to thank you ...

    Greek
    I C, II B 2 d 1, I F 3, IV
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 13, 1933
    Children's Christmas Joy

    Last year there was hardly any Hungarian who made so many children happy at Christmas time as did our well-known compatriot Eugene Petrovits, and his wife. Petrovits, who is a hardware dealer, began the distribution of Christmas gifts a year ago last Christmas at the hall of the Hungarian Roman Catholic Church, where he presented one hundred Hungarian youngsters with gifts.

    As this year the depression struck more Hungarian people, this Christmas Petrovits doubled the number of gifts, appearing at the Hungarian Roman Catholic Church as Santa Claus and giving presents to two hundred Hungarian children, making them all very happy.

    Eugene Petrovits and his wife deserve the praise and acknowledgment of the Hungarians in Chicago.

    Last year there was hardly any Hungarian who made so many children happy at Christmas time as did our well-known compatriot Eugene Petrovits, and his wife. Petrovits, who is a ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 b, II D 10, IV
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 13, 1933
    Successful Celebration of the First Slovak Radio Hour

    The first Slovak Radio Hour, in Chicago, has just celebrated its first anniversary. The celebration lasted two days, Jan. 7, and 8, in the Bohemian-American Auditorium. The directors of the Slovak Hour sponsored a dance Saturday, and the following day a very interesting and artistic program was presented.

    The dance was well attendded, but at the Sunday program the hall was packed to capacity. The sponsors will remember this successful affair for many years.

    Two orchestras played during the celebration. One in the upper hall, and the other in the lower hall. The orchestras played on Sunday until 8 P.M. The evening program commenced at nine o'clock. The pgoram consisted of

    2

    singing, dancing, speeches, and comical performances. During the intermission, an orchestra which played, was directed by Mr. M. Pavela. The entire program was interesting and amusing, and it is certain it was enjoyed by all.

    Congratulations and sincere thanks are rendered to Mr. V. V. Kalnik, the director, for the success of the celebration.

    The first Slovak Radio Hour, in Chicago, has just celebrated its first anniversary. The celebration lasted two days, Jan. 7, and 8, in the Bohemian-American Auditorium. The directors of the ...

    Slovak
    II B 2 e, II A 3 b, IV
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 13, 1933
    Neither Chicago Nor Wilkes-Barre, but General Consolidation by N. Komiakov

    Last Saturday in "Novosti" [The News--page in Rassviet devoted to the Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society], an editorial was printed under the title "Chicago or Wilkes-Barre" in which a grievance was stated because Levitskoe Obshchestvo Vzaimopomoshchi" (Russian Orthodox Catholic Mutual Aid Society at Holy Trinity Cathedral, 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Illinois) is again making overtures toward the Vilkes-Barskomu Obshchestvu (Russian Orthodox Catholic Mutual Aid Society) at Wilkes-Barre, from which organization they withdrew sometime ago; the article also states in conclusion that "Chicago is better than Wilkes-Barre". In the article the statement is made that "Levitsi" [Russian Mutual Aid Society on Leavitt Street, Chicago, Ill.] Obshchestvo Vzaimopomoshchi (Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society) of Chicago, because "we Chicagoans must take care of ourselves."

    2

    "To take care of one's self"--that is an old problem. Who today does not think of taking care of himself?

    The capitalist cutting the wages of the workers is taking care of himself because he wants to receive more profit. The same capitalist is taking care of himself when he closes the shop and throws the workers on the streets because he is afraid that the workers may eat up the capital which he has accumulated. The speculator on the stock exchange, gambling on the rise and fall of the stocks, is taking care of himself because the fluctuation of prices goes into his pocket. The bandit robbing the safe takes care of himself because the contents pass into his hands. The banker, his bank insolvent, pays out to his clients [a few] cents on the dollar; he is taking care of himself because the remaining part of the dollar goes to his benefit. Capone, serving at present a term in prison, took care of himself when he was engaged in the bootlegging business by removing his competitors from his path.

    Examples of "taking care of one's self" can be given by the thousands, but 3each one of them reveals only genuine selfishness and has no relation with the brotherhood ideal even if such illustrations are covered with the best intentions. The brotherhood organization should take an opposite attitude--to take care not of one's self but of others, of everyone. The goal of the brotherhood should be to fight against egoism, not to put it forward as a slogan to be fulfilled.

    With the reproach addressed to the Russian Orthodox Catholic Mutual Aid Society we might agree, if the writer of the editorial had definitely confirmed the fact that the Wilkes-Barre organization has, for a long time been frozen to the point of death, that the membership decreases, and that generally the organization actually lags behind, and that the Chicago organization, to the contrary, strives to develop and to keep in step with the requirements of modern life; it works and develops the idea of general unification, it wishes to gather all the Russians into one united family, and to prove this fact, RNzOV states that the organization is on the eve of merging with ROOV Russkoe Ob'edinennoe Obshchestvo Vzaimopomoshchi (Russian Consolidated Mutual 4Aid Society), etc. Unfortunately the author did not say a word about this matter.

    And therefore not only did the author of the said editorial not prove the preferability of "Chicago" over "Wilkes-Barre", but on the contrary suggested to the reader that "Chicago" itself was not on the right path, since it was not seeking general consolidation, but showed it up as taking care of one's self."

    As long as the leaders of Russian organizations praise only their own home cities, be it Chicago, New York, or Wilkes-Barre--it makes no difference which--there will be no general solidarity in the Russian colony, not to mention the small individual organizations, which sooner or later become bankrupt if they do not unite. Therefore the salvation rests not in Chicago or Wilkes-Barre, but in a general consolidation of Chicago, New York, Wilkes-Barre, "Levitsi" and others.

    Last Saturday in "Novosti" [The News--page in Rassviet devoted to the Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society], an editorial was printed under the title "Chicago or Wilkes-Barre" in which a grievance ...

    Russian
    II D 1, III C, III A, I E
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 13, 1933
    The Problems of the Russian Consolidated Mutual Aid Society

    Any living organism--be it a solitary human being, a group, or a large organization--must progress, and should aspire towards some goal. Otherwise there is no active life; there is no interest, and sometimes there is only a very injurious vegetation. Roov, Russkoe Ob'edinennoe Obshchestvo Vzaimopomoshchi (The Russian Consolidated Mutual Aid Society) is a great social organization composed of several branches. As a large organization it must lead an active life, aspire toward some goal in life which is sought by the majority of its members. Without such a goal, without a common ambition, the organization cannot progress. What, then, are its problems--or to speak correctly, requirements--at the present time?

    There are several. Three of them are foremost: to establish a loan and savings bank, to organize the youth and to encourage their activity in the Roov, and to develop a better Roov page in Rassviet.

    2

    Let us begin with the last. It is necessary to discuss openly and clearly from all points of view the mediocrity of our page. Its main shortcoming is that the articles are of a political or polemical character, and such articles are not acceptable in the page of Roov. In general, they are weak on all points; in ideas, in the experience and authority of the writers, and in the manner of exposition, that is, in simple elementary grammar. Besides, all these articles are against some members of our organization. After reading such illiterate trash, some amount of filth settles and always remains on the soul, and one does not care to read further.

    The page of the Roov must serve as a bond which ties together the branches and the central organization, as well as each branch with the other. For this purpose, it should have the character of a news page. Yet, how will we receive the necessary information about the social work of the branches at present? We must have a permanent correspondent whose duty will not be 3to write political articles, but to inform us by absolutely correct and authentic reports of the social activities of his particular branch.

    Incidentally, as I understand it, the central organization has repeatedly directed the branches to send statements of their social activities, but there have been no results. And this is understandable because the center should appeal not to the branches, but to the individual members of the branches who are more or less educated. There should be a correspondent in every branch of the organization for the page of Roov.

    The last problem, to establish a loan and savings bank, was approved by the branches and the majority of the committee, but as difficult as it is to organize [such a bank] in the branches, it is just as essential to organize it in the center and to do this as soon as possible. It is necessary for the main committee to pass on this question very speedily. I do not doubt that the loan and savings department will be established and that it will bring the desired and successful results.

    4

    To organize the youth is the vital problem of the society. The center is doing everything possible to accomplish this promptly. But the center has neither the sufficient resources nor sufficient members among its organizers. It is urgent that the branches shall not only indicate their desire to organize the youth but shall work toward the realization of that desire. Instead many branches make a laughing matter of this problem. More action is required.

    Any living organism--be it a solitary human being, a group, or a large organization--must progress, and should aspire towards some goal. Otherwise there is no active life; there is no ...

    Russian
    II D 1, II B 2 d 1, II A 2, III E
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 13, 1933
    Club Furdek Held Meeting

    The Club Furdek held its regular monthly meeting, last Sunday, in the Saint Simon's parish hall. New officers for the coming year were elected. Rev. Charles Florek was chosen as spiritual adviser; Mr. Florian Tylka, president; Mr. John Dluhy, vice-president; Mayr Wargos, recording secretary; Cornelia Flaska, financial secretary; Mr. John Hlavacka, treasurer; Mr. George Galos, president of the entertainment committee; Mr. Joseph Steller, president of the membership committee and Dr. Peter Hletko, president of the literature committee.

    A letter from Mr. Fredrick Dvonc, member of the Club, who is continuing his violin studies, was read at the meeting. He wrote to the members about his progress, and also mentioned his desire to be present among them. His letter was enjoyed by all the members.

    2

    Many serious matters were discussed at the meeting. It was decided that all future meetings will be held in the La Salle Hotel. In the early part of February, a banquet will be held, in the hotel, in honor of the newly elected officers. The Slovak public is invited to this banquet. The admission is $1.50, per person.

    The entertaining committee announced that a theatrical piece has been selected, called "The Last Husband." It will be shown in the near future.

    It was also decided that the Club's officers should publicly declare their support of the Slovaks, who resigned from the Czecho-Slovak World's Fair Committee, when they learned the name Czecho-Slovak was to be used without the hyphen.

    3

    Much attention was given to the "Slovak Youths' Week." It will be held sometime during the period of the World's Fair. During that week, stage performances, concerts, dances, banquets, lectures, and other educational attractions will be held, and the entire Slovak youth will be cordially invited and welcomed. The purpose of the "Youth Week" is to awaken in our Slovak youth, Slovak consciousness and the love for their Slovak origin, and reveal to those youths, cultural achievements of the Slovak nation.

    The Club Furdek held its regular monthly meeting, last Sunday, in the Saint Simon's parish hall. New officers for the coming year were elected. Rev. Charles Florek was chosen as ...

    Slovak
    III B 2, II B 1 c 1, III E, I C, IV