The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    Lysistrata Triumphs in Anglo-Saxon "Garb" Sedles Goes as Far as Law Permits. Norman Bell Geddes, a Flop by Demetrius Glympias

    p. 3.- Whilst not possessing everything required to make an Aristophanian play complete, the Lysistrata as performed by the Coburn players, is as good as should be expected under the circumstances. For, had Gilbert Seldes gone two steps farther, in being more true to the original, the hounds of the censors and the furies of the reformers would have swooped upon him mercilessly.

    The same cannot be said for the work of Norman Bel Geddes. His stage setting is so hopelessly anachronistic and inappropriate that, were it not for the classical costumes worn by the actors, one would even surmise the setting was intended for a Greek play. It is a drab, coffee-colored structure, in elongated perpendicular lines, monotonously tiring and uninteresting. In short, it is another cubistic eyesore, in the stretched 2meters of a modern city skyscraper, by Bel Geddes, without even an inkling of the rocky massiveness and architectural magnificence of the Acropolis pertained in Aristophanes.

    Lest the reader be led to believe that this writer has an aversion for skyscrapers, he wishes to make known, that he has not. In all sincerity, he hails the skyscraper as an outstanding achievement, (distinctly American) in the history of modern Architecture. But its effects cannot lend favor to the setting for a Greek play.

    So much for Seldes and Bel Geddes. Now a few remarks about the good work of the actors. Mrs. Coburn, in the stellar role, interprets her part masterly. Her fine acting in this play is reminiscent of her past successes in the roles of Iphigenia, Electra, Antigone and Media. Both she and Mr. Coburn have been devout admirers and tireless workers in the craft of Greek plays for more than two decades.

    3

    Nydia Westman, as Kalonika, is little short of charming. Her appeal for aid to surpress her ardent longings for love can command help from a man any time. The delivery of her lines, "Oh, goddess! ease the pains of labor", exacted a storm of laughter from the audience. Kalonika, you sure are a tropical mamma.

    Myrrhina, (Juliette Day) is an amorous dame with jet-black hair. She meets the return of her husband with lots of reluctant affection. She promises all to him. Makes everything ready and then gives him nothing. Poor Kinesias! It was a good thing peace was immediately signed, otherwise--, well 'tis better left unsaid.

    Of all the women in the cast representing the different cities of Greece, the women of Corinth were the most painted up. They were painted-up as they used to be in the good old days, with bold dashes of cobalt blue beneath their eye-brows, thick vermilion on their lips and rouge in abundance on their cheeks. They looked the prettiest of all the women in the cast. That is, from a distance. I wonder how the women of Lykoporgia look today.

    4

    We must not forget to mention Lampito, (Hope Emerson), the Spartan woman. She, too, played her part as though she were a regular he-man of the good old days. More power to you Lampito, and Mr. and Mrs. Coburn, we would welcome you back in another Greek play next season.

    p. 3.- Whilst not possessing everything required to make an Aristophanian play complete, the Lysistrata as performed by the Coburn players, is as good as should be expected under the ...

    Greek
    II A 3 d 1
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    "Toronto Globe" Uncle Sam and the "Dole"

    p. 2.- Uncle Sam, so recently symbolizing the greatest wealth in the world, now talks openly of the "dole" for relief in his own country. Congress is passing through a troublous time, debating how best to relieve distress and reassure a restless people. Whatever else the high tariff has done, it has not prevented hunger and unemployment.

    Since the opening of Congress, early in December, much time has been taken in making appropriations for the emergency, and with little practical results. In the welter of talk, Senator Borah dramatically appealed to his fellow-members to "do something for the people who are hungry." The New York Times refers to a $60,000,000 relief bill as carrying a dole of "human food." President Hoover's request for a $150,000,000 emergency building program to provide employment.

    2

    It is little wonder that a feeling of alarm has arisen. The Federal Treasury is confronted with a deficit of between $300,000,000 and $400,000,000, even though relief measures are kept down to the modest amount asked by the President.

    The rush of Congressmen to introduce bills is described by one newspaper as "the hysteria of relief" and there is fear that measures will lack coherency, cost vast sums of money, and still be disappointing in result.

    Senator Borah, who is celebrated for his cantor and freedom from dictation, brings the public back to earth with this statement. "If the public wants the expenditures, the public will have to pay the bill. There seems to be a widespread belief that you can restore prosperity from the public treasury. It is a false theory. Dire emergencies will have to be met from the public treasury, but the idea that you can restore permanent prosperity by spending public money, and thereby necessitating the imposing of more taxes, is unsound.

    3

    "I favor, therefore, holding down the expenditures as much as possible, a deficit is created, I favor increasing the income taxes especially in the higher brackets."

    All of which sounds ominous in the light of the extravagance of recent years. The results will also give the United States a mild taste of what has been endured by "poor old Europe."

    The experience will, likewise, prove an eye-opener for those who thought the Republic could sell to all the world, buy little or nothing and live in perpetual prosperity.

    p. 2.- Uncle Sam, so recently symbolizing the greatest wealth in the world, now talks openly of the "dole" for relief in his own country. Congress is passing through a ...

    Greek
    I C, I E
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 01, 1931
    First Dance Given by the Greek-American Young Girls Chapter of "Kypseli" Order of Gapa (Greek American Progressive Association)

    p. 4.- The Greek-American young girls of the Chapter "Kypseli" Order of Gapa, are working with great zeal for the successful outcome of their first dance next Sunday, Jan. 18th, in the Cameo Room of the Morrison Hotel. The program will be rich. Among the special numbers will be Constant Nichols, star classical dancer in the immortal play, "Lyssistrata" of Aristophanes, now playing in Chicago.

    Mr. Nichols will dance before general dancing starts and show the audience his exceptional talent. We are sure everybody will have a good time supporting a worthy cause. I will meet you there.

    p. 4.- The Greek-American young girls of the Chapter "Kypseli" Order of Gapa, are working with great zeal for the successful outcome of their first dance next Sunday, Jan. 18th, ...

    Greek
    III B 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 02, 1931
    New Year Message to the Reformed (Calvinist) People of Chicago and Vicinity

    We are rushing ahead on the wings of time. Each year robs us of a part of our life. Time's swiftly moving chariot carries us away from our course against our will.

    We immigrants from Hungary have had this experience. Almost all of us came to this country with the intention of staying here for only a few years and returning to the land of our birth, to die and rest where the remains of our forefathers lie.

    However, as years went by we were diverted from our original purpose, and today when we sing the Hungarian hymn, "Here you must live and die"--in spite of our undying love for our mother country--we mean America.

    From Hungarian wanderers we became home-building Americans. And, lest the 2onrush of time sweep us away, we must keep together, rally around the altars of our faith, so that we may be strong in unity. Today there is hardly one among us who can say that he will not join a society or church in America, because he is going back to Hungary. As the years have gone by, our course has been changed. Therefore, let us heed the warning of the New Year: "Hungarian-Americans, patronize your institutions; join the church and society groups, so that the onrush of time will not carry you with it and leave not a trace behind!"

    In Chicago and vicinity the immigrant Hungarians have built and are supporting a number of Reformed churches. These churches welcome all members of the Reformed and Evangelical faiths.

    The Hungarian Zion Classis has formulated the following rules for us to abide by:

    "The presbytery of each church is to appoint a committee who, together with 3the pastor, will visit members or prospective members and have them pledge their support. Those who have become members must promise to contribute to the church fund and to missionary purposes. Only those who make a written pledge will be considered members in good standing. Only members in good standing will be entitled to the services of the pastor and can par-take of the Sacraments.

    "Eugene Boros, Dean,

    "Burnside Hungarian Reformed Church".....

    We are rushing ahead on the wings of time. Each year robs us of a part of our life. Time's swiftly moving chariot carries us away from our course against ...

    Hungarian
    III C, III G, III H, III A, IV
  • Osadne Hlasy -- January 02, 1931
    This and That (Editorial.)

    With the present issue, Osadne Hlasy begins its fourth year of existence. We can not, however, boast at this time of its circulation because it does not coincide with our expectations. However, we will add that unavoidable conditions such as the depression, confronted us. Therefore, Osadne Hlasy is thankful for such progress as has been made under these adverse circumstances, and it is able to face the future with more confidence.

    Efforts to bring about co-operation and closer relationship among our various Slovak Catholic groups have been very successful. Therefore, it is our duty to subscribe to the only Slovak Catholic Weekly published in the Middle West.

    With the present issue, Osadne Hlasy begins its fourth year of existence. We can not, however, boast at this time of its circulation because it does not coincide with our ...

    Slovak
    II B 2 d 1, III C
  • Chicago Jewish Chronicle -- January 02, 1931
    (No headline)

    Dr. Michael L. Aren, a well known communal worker, died on Sunday. He was born in Novogrudok, Russia, August 11, 1869.

    He arrived in New York in 1891, and came to Chicago in 1893. Mr. Aren was one of the founders of the "Self-Educational Club," and served as its president three years. He was also president of the Beaconsfield Club, one of the first directors of the Hebrew Institute, and he helped organize the Federated Charities.

    Mr. Aren has been secretary of the dental staff of the B. M. Z. from the beginning and has been a director of the Home for a number of years, as well as its Recording Secretary. He has also rendered long and valuable service on the dental staffs of the Michael Reese Dispensary and the Chicago Winfield Sanitarium.

    Dr. Michael L. Aren, a well known communal worker, died on Sunday. He was born in Novogrudok, Russia, August 11, 1869. He arrived in New York in 1891, and came ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • Danish Times -- January 02, 1931
    Denmark--A Co-Operative Commonwealth

    [Translator's note: This is one of a series of lectures given throughout the United States.]

    Denmark covers an area of 17,000 square miles, twice the size of Massachusetts, and has a population of three-quarter million. Thirty-six per cent of the inhabitants are engaged in agriculture.

    A deep pessimism spread over Denmark after the War of 1864, when the country lost one of her most valuable provinces to Germany--North Schleswig. The nation went through a period of profound despair, and the people seemed most inclined to give up all hope for the future. If it had not been for the deepseated conviction in one single individual of the mission of Denmark as a nation, and his implicit faith in the Danish people and their future, Denmark might today have been an impoverished and highly insignificant country, not worthy 2of mention in the society of nations.

    That man was the educator and reformer, Bishop N. F. S. Grundtvig. He instilled hope into a nation possessed by gloom and despair, and today Denmark is one of the most prosperous countries in Europe. Bishop Grundtvig's methods were educational. He established people's high schools [Translator's note: government subsidized colleges] all over the country which the sons and daughters of farmers attended. In these schools stress was laid upon national history and culture. He instilled in his pupils national pride, and taught them the value of labor. Through these schools, which are unique in character, Grundtvig awakened the youth of Denmark intellectually and spiritually and fitted them for great tasks. He implanted mutual trust and helpfulness in the young Danish farmer, and out of their living together in the high schools, developed a spirit of working together, the spirit which lies at the root of the widespread and internationally known Danish co-operative movement.

    The first co-operative dairy was established in 1881, and today there are more 3than 1,400 co-operative dairies in Denmark. A co-operative dairy is usually started by a group of farmers who contribute to its erection, and pledge themselves to supply the milk from a certain number of cows. When the building is completed a trained dairyman is placed at the head of the dairy. The dairy is immediately linked up with an expert butter association, controlled by the farmers, and as soon as the dairy has started, its products join the stream of butter, which is exported to England, Germany, and other countries every day of the year. England has for many years been the chief customer of Danish agricultural products and still is.

    When the Danish farmers had achieved success in co-operative butter production, and raised their butter to a standard quality so that it was considered the best butter in the world, they saw in the traditional English breakfast bacon a new field for their products. They began to raise hogs, and using the same methods employed in the establishment of co-operative dairies, they now began to establish co-operative packing houses. Today there are about sixty large 4co-operative packing houses in Denmark, and ninety per cent of the swine butchered in Denmark, are dressed in the co-operative packing houses. In 1924 more than three million swine were killed and exported to the English market. Some of the largest packing houses killed more than one hundred thousand swine in a year. The farmers who are members or share holders in the co-operative packing houses deliver their swine on certain days of the week, and are paid current prices. Each member has one vote in the management of the co-operative. Nobody has more than one vote.

    The co-operatives are managed by experienced men, paid by the farmers. The manager is responsible to all members for the management of the business. He has to be in close contact with the European marketing conditions, and must notify the farmers about different demands from the buyers, demands for heavier or lighter hogs, etc. Likewise he must keep in touch with new methods of combating diseases and inform the farmers of this.

    Once a year, on the day of the general meeting, the surplus or net profit is 5divided and paid out through one of the banks. This is paid out in cash and received personally by the farmer. Each year shows an increase in the surplus. Besides being paid for his hogs according to the world market prices, the Danish farmers receive a profit out of the packing house of which he is part owner. His market is always secure, and he is always entitled to the highest prices obtainable.

    In more recent years the Danish farmers have concentrated on another important article on the English breakfast table--eggs. Co-operative egg collecting societies were established in several places in the country, each society covering a certain district. At each of these places the eggs are carefully examined, dated, numbered, and packed to be exported to England. Millions of eggs are exported each year. Being packed in specially designed boxes, the eggs are fresh, when they reach the English customer, and newlaid eggs are in great demand in the large English centers.

    By a very shrewd system of classification and marketing, the packing houses 6can trace each of the millions of eggs handled annually to the producer, who runs a great risk of being excluded from the co-operative society if he is responsible for sending in eggs that are not fresh. In the buildings of these egg collecting societies are great tanks, where millions of eggs can be preserved for months and thrown on the British market when the eggs supplied by other countries are scarce. In thirty years, from 1881 to 1912, the value of the exports of Danish agricultural products increased from twelve million dollars to one hundred and twenty-five million dollars. In 1928 the sum was $434,700,000, and it has been steadily increasing since. There are now three hundred thousand small farmers in Denmark. In 1922 2,544,000 tons of wheat, rye, barley, and mixed grains were raised from three million acres.

    As may be expected, the Danish farmer has also learned the great advantage in co-operative import. Large co-operative concerns buy corn and forage, including oil coke, from abroad. Before the war, 1,700,000 tons of oil coke were bought annually. Likewise agricultural machinery and implements are bought by cooperative associations, so that the individual farmer reaps the advantages 7through wholesale buying. The Danish farmers have also established hundreds of co-operative retail stores, mostly grocery stores, which are supplied with goods manufactured in their own factories or imported by their co-operative association. In all departments of life the Danish farmer has seen the advantage of co-operative efforts.

    The co-operative associations have representatives in all the larger European countries and in the United States, who investigate marketing conditions and report upon them month by month. The Danish government pays large sums to agricultural experts who experiment with the newest methods beneficial to the farmers. As soon as new methods have proved their worth, the Danish farmer is quick to adopt them. He uses all discoveries which are to his own advantage, and he is always on the alert for any new improvement.

    The Danish farmer is self-reliant and rich in initiative. He feels himself a member of the whole movement, and feels the responsibility he holds as contributing to the success of the movement. He has a world outlook, knowing that 8his success is dependent on the equality of his products. He is, with few, rare exceptions, a man of education, and farmers have often held important positions in the government.

    He often has a library of his own. He is alive to all the questions of the day, and each Danish village has an assembly hall where, in the fall and winter months, prominent speakers give lectures on important subjects. He sends his sons and daughters to the people's high schools that he attended in his youth, and they are very early impressed with the importance of the movement and the high place it holds in the life of their nation.

    Many of the young men attend argicultural high schools, and when they start out to farm for themselves they possess an intimate knowledge of scientific farming methods and of the intricacies of the marketing system of the co-operative movement, and they are well qualified to join the ranks of those men who are not inaptly called "the best farmers in the world".

    [Translator's note: This is one of a series of lectures given throughout the United States.] Denmark covers an area of 17,000 square miles, twice the size of Massachusetts, and has ...

    Danish
    III H, I C
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 03, 1931
    Pan-Cretan Society's Invitation.

    Tomorrow, Sunday, January 4th, the Tan-Cretan Society of young ladies invites members of Chicago and vicinity to come to Hull House, Polk and Halsted St. and participate in the traditional celebration of cutting the New Year cake.

    From the office of the society.

    Tomorrow, Sunday, January 4th, the Tan-Cretan Society of young ladies invites members of Chicago and vicinity to come to Hull House, Polk and Halsted St. and participate in the traditional ...

    Greek
    I B 4, III E, V A 1
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 03, 1931
    Success of the Ahepa Dance.

    The heralded dance of the united chapters of Ahepa, a benefit given for the poor, took place, last Monday, December 29th, at the Trianon.

    The great success of the dance was accomplished by the participation of 3,000 people.

    The dance was honored by the presence of Miss Alice Diplarakou, "Miss Europe," who was escorted by her entourage composed of nine local, beautiful girls representing the nine Euses. The dance lasted until the morning hours.

    Constantine Argyris, member of the Columbia Ice Cream Co., assisted the success of the dance with a contribution of five hundred dollars.

    The heralded dance of the united chapters of Ahepa, a benefit given for the poor, took place, last Monday, December 29th, at the Trianon. The great success of the dance ...

    Greek
    II D 10, III B 2, II D 1
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 03, 1931
    Plenipontentiary Extraordinary of the Ecumenical Patriarchate Officiates at St. Constantine Church.

    The Most Rev. Damaskinos, Metropolitan, last Sunday, assisted by Rev. Petrakis and Rev. Hatzidimetriou, Archdeacon, officiated at the church of St. Constantine on the South Side. The high prelate,very much impressed by the grandeur and splendor of the Church, the order and quiet of the multitude, who came to mass, in an eloquent speech extolled the progressiveness of the community and commended them for their devotion to our Orthodoxy and the endeavors to perpetuate the Greek language. After the rituals, a magnificent banquet, in honor of the Legate, was given by the Rev. Petrakia. Many prominent Chicago Greeks participated.

    The Most Rev. Damaskinos, Metropolitan, last Sunday, assisted by Rev. Petrakis and Rev. Hatzidimetriou, Archdeacon, officiated at the church of St. Constantine on the South Side. The high prelate,very much ...

    Greek
    III C, IV