The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Vilnis -- January 05, 1927
    Lecture on Classical Literature

    Comrade V. Andrulis, editor of the Daily Vilnis, will deliver a lecture on "Classical Literature," Thursday evening, Jan. 6, at the Vilnis hall, 3116 So. Halsted Street. All Lithuanians are invited to attend. Admission is free.

    Many of our people are under the impression that fiction, such as short stories and novels, is usless, and worthless, and that it is a waste of time for readers. However, it is a fact that classical literature plays a very important role in the life of humanity. Such literature is a large factor in the education of the people.

    2

    All these points about the great value of classical literature will be explained fully at the lecture. Quotations will be read from the works of the best authors. Suggestions about how to obtain the most benefit from classical literature will also be made.

    Comrade V. Andrulis, editor of the Daily Vilnis, will deliver a lecture on "Classical Literature," Thursday evening, Jan. 6, at the Vilnis hall, 3116 So. Halsted Street. All Lithuanians are ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 g, II B 1 e, IV
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 05, 1927
    Polish Arts Club

    The following amendments of the constitution of the Polish Arts Club, will be voted upon at the business meeting on January 9, 1927 at 3:30 P.M. in the club room of the Art Institute.

    1.- Article II will be amended by adding the following paragraph : "Rendering moral and material aid to promising Polish and American writers, musicians, artists and students of the Arts."

    2.- Article III, section 2, will be amended to read as follows: "Regular, Student, Sustaining, Life and Honorary Members. Paragraphs a, b, c, d, will remain the same. Paragraph e to read as follows: Only those who have performed meritorious services in the cause of music, literature or other arts, especially of Poland or the United States, are eligible for honorary membership.

    Names of honorary members will be presented and voted upon in the prescribed manner for constitutional amendments.

    The following amendments of the constitution of the Polish Arts Club, will be voted upon at the business meeting on January 9, 1927 at 3:30 P.M. in the club room ...

    Polish
    II B 1 d
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 05, 1927
    Dangers of War between Mexico and United States

    The Republic of Mexico, with President Calles as its leader, is conducting a religious war in Mexico, as well as an economic war with its powerful neighbor, the United States. This is a typical economic war between two countries. The most important reason for this conflict is the exploitation of Mexico by American industry. At one time, President Diaz opened the door of Mexico to the United States for exploitation, hoping that better uniform economic conditions would ensue.

    In the year of 1901 it relieved foreign capital of taxes, the importation of machinery and the exporting of oil was also free from taxation. In the year of 1907, the United States settled, and assumed property ownership in Mexico. An English Association, Pearson Co., did likewise and Holland followed in 1923. This started a dispute among these nations. In the year of 1923, American co-operations offered president Huerta $200,000,000, for exclusive rights and options to their oil fields. However, a revolutionary outburst, in Carranza, made it impossible to reach an agreement. Because of financial pressure at end of 1913, Washington, broke diplomatic relations with Mexico, and in the month of April 1914, stationed an army at Vera Cruz. This action did not meet with the approval of European nations. An open warfare was started.

    2

    The United States had an entirely free hand. An Expedition under the command of General Pershing, was sent to Mexico to take disciplinary action, which resulted in attacks and invasions by Mexican bandits along the borders of United States. Mexico will reply that the constitution of Queretaro of 1917, included articles of defiance against foreign finance. The most important part is; "The land ownership rights are restricted and confined, only to the nations of Mexico, and concessions to mine, coal, and established water power projects. Mexico can also grant the rights to all foreigners, providing they do not seek the influence of their governments" thus: American may not acquire land or any territorial rights within the radius of 100 miles of the border.

    It is lastly stipulated, that foreign stock companies are not privileged to acquire tillable land. This enactment caused the United States to be angry, and created a panic in the stock market. It was understood that the investment of American capital is estimated at $2,000,000 dollars; some of the American productive co-operation branches controlling 90 percent of ownership. Any addition to the amendment of the constitution, would be a loss of great wealth. Under pressure, Washington, in 1919, brought to attention, the conditional paragraph of foreign ownership in Mexico; and president Obregon, was officially praised by the-administration in Washington. According to this agreement condition, the amendment will bind only those foreigners who in the future desire to exploit the wealth of Mexico.

    3

    However, President Calles, in spite of the tradition set by his predecessor, and without regard, began applying rules to the constitution. After conducting a series of acceptances, he designated the first day of January as the date when all foreign interest will be under government jurisdiction. This resulted in a severe reprimand by the United States, in a note, in which they expressed their readiness to object, unless Mexico conforms to a decision handed down by the Supreme Court in Hague. The Calles administration will dissolve the oil industry, supporting the action of a revolution among their workers. It will effect the reducing of production, and the increasing unemployment.

    In this conflict, noble opinion would favor the nation in which they set up a dominion of foreign capital. In addition to this unwarranted conflict, the question of religious persecution was added. This, of course, is a conspiracy instigated by the enemies of the church; using unemployment as a tool for discontent and corruption, and creating thereby an artificial stimulus for religious conflict. They wish to place capital and religion on one battlefront, this manuever should not proceed. With a non-partisan view, one can readily determine the real enemy - American capital; and the imaginery one - religion.

    The Republic of Mexico, with President Calles as its leader, is conducting a religious war in Mexico, as well as an economic war with its powerful neighbor, the United States. ...

    Polish
    I G, I D 1 a
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 06, 1927
    Sweden in America and America in Sweden (Editorial)

    p. 11. "The Singing Vikings" is the cognomen which the Swedish National Choir, the singing society ("De Svenske,") should use during their proposed American tournament this summer. It begins in New York City with a concert in Carnegie Hall, June 1, and continues Westward to arrive in Chicago, the capitol of all Swedish-Americans, June 5. The American program will take one and one-half months, and "De Svenske's" return to Sweden is scheduled for July 14.

    If nothing unforeseen happens, it is the intention of the Chicago Swedish Choral Club to set its course for Sweden at about the same time. Leaving Chicago June 1; two or three concerts will be given in the East, before they embark upon the 5/5 Stockholm on June 4, arriving in Goteborg (Gothenburg) on the 14th,where the first concert will be given in the Concert House the next evening. The course then goes Southward along the west-coast of Sweden, with concerts in the larger cities and in 2Copenhagen's Tivoli, which concert will be in charge of the well-known Danish-American of Chicago, Max Henius, who is held in high esteem in his native land. From here the tour goes through Southern and Eastern Sweden with detour to the Island of Oland, arriving in Stockholm July 2. Three concerts will be given, one on July 4, which, no doubt will be a grand celebration of our National Holiday.

    In another steamer, chartered for the occasion, the choir goes to Finland, where concerts will begin in Abo and Helsingfors, and to which the Finns are looking for ward with great interest. Mixed choir-song is the Finns' specialty, and the performance will perhaps be more closely scrutinized than anywhere else.

    Added interest is given this Finnish visit through the simultaneous arrival of the Swedish 5/5 Drottningholm in Helsingfors, bringing with it eight-hundred Finnish-American delegates to a congress.

    After the Finland concerts, Norland will be visited. Whether or not the itinerary will include Ostersund depends upon the wishes and desires of the people there, 3otherwise the tour will continue through Dalarne and Varmland to Oslo and possibly Trondhjem and Bergen,Norway. The tournament will end at Skara in the early part of August, in order to accommodate those who wish to return on a Swedish steamship August 6.

    Mr. Axel Hulton, the choir's business manager, who just returned from Sweden after having planned the itinerary, reported great interest in the Chicago Choir's second tournament to the "Old Land," all points visited on our last trip will extend to us a hearty "welcome back," and new places not formerly visited are much interested. The memory of the last tournament in 1920 is still fresh in the minds of the people, the songs they presented and the exemplary performance of the individuals.

    About seventy people will participate with Edgar Nelson, as director. He has been the leader since the choir's inception.

    Who the soloists will be had not as yet been decided upon, nor the non-singing participants.

    The choir belongs to Sweden's Choir Society which has a membership of more than seven-thousand. 4The president is the late Secretary of State, Sandler; and the Secretary, Civil Engineer, Graner, member of Royal Swedish Railway's Board of Directors.

    His Royal Highness, Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf, who was the tournament's protector last time, has also this time voluntarily assumed the same protectorship.

    p. 11. "The Singing Vikings" is the cognomen which the Swedish National Choir, the singing society ("De Svenske,") should use during their proposed American tournament this summer. It begins in ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 a
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 06, 1927
    Polish Artists Arriving in Chicago

    A troupe of 20 Polish Artists who are en route to Chicago from New York will present the famous folk drama of Ladislaus Reymont's Peasants. Interpertation of the drama will be supervised by Mr. T. Piotrowski and directed by Theodore Wandycz and Ladislaus Ochrymowicz.

    Presentation of the drama Peasants will be shown at Saint Stanislaus Kostka parish hall Saturday evening, and a matinee Sunday at 2 P. M. with an evening performance at 8 P. M.

    A troupe of 20 Polish Artists who are en route to Chicago from New York will present the famous folk drama of Ladislaus Reymont's Peasants. Interpertation of the drama will ...

    Polish
    II A 3 d 1
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 06, 1927
    Swedish Christmas Concert (Editorial)

    p.11. The Swedish Choral Club's Christmas concert, Sunday evening in Orchestra Hall, was given before a packed house, which was very generous with its applause.

    The program was very appropriate to the season. Handel's Oratorio "Messiah," was subjected to an excellent execution, thanks largely to Edgar Nelson's able directorship and his untiring efforts to bring the choir to where he wants it to be, "the best in America."

    The soloists were excellent, each within their respective field. Should anyone be mentioned in particular, it must be Mrs. Jennie E. Peterson, who sang the soprano part like the artist she is. This evening more than ever before she proved to the public that she is a songbird of the highest rank. She should, with equal honor to herself and her Swedish name, become the leading star in "Messiah's" 2American home town, Lindsborg,Kansas. Should the "Messiah" Choir ever be in need of a first class bass soloist, we can with a clear conscience not only recommend but demand that the Swedish Choral Club's latest acquired talent, Rollin Pease, be chosen. We have not heard anyone sing his part with such ability since the days of our unforgettable Gustaf Holmquist. with this we believe we have said enough, and shall only refer our readers to the Chicago Evening American's well-known music critic, Herman Devries, who, the evening after, wrote in his paper as follows:

    "The Swedish Choral Club gave a very successful performance of Handel's 'Messiah' at Orchestra Hall last evening, under the experienced and reliable guidance of Edgar Nelson. The interpreting artists were Rollin Pease, baritone; Jennie Peterson, soprano; Watt Webber, tenor; Mme. Gilderoy Scott, contralto; Harry Carlson, organist, and fifty members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

    "I think I shall find no dissenting voices to question my opinion, when I give the first place to Rollin Pease, who accomplished one of the finest achievements in 3oratorio singing as yet recorded in his prosperous public career. He is, of course an expert oratorio artist. familiar with all the traditions, therefore, an authority who combines sound musicianship with excellent voice and schooling to set it forth at its best. He sang his entire score without a printed reference and was in exceptionally good vocal form.

    "Miss Peterson has a lovely voice. She, too, is a reliable and expert musician, who deserved a goodly share of the applause. Mme. Scott was less effective in her solo, 'Oh Thou That Tellest,' where the tone sounded somewhat muffled, but entirely satisfactory in the duet with Miss Peterson, 'He Shall Feed.' Here the two voices blended exquisitely, with all the delicacy of shading one associates with the muted strings. This episode was therefore one of the most enjoyable moments of the evening.

    "Watt Webber knew his music well, and was particularly successful in the recitation, 'Comfort Ye,' and the air, 'Every Valley Shall Be Exalted.' He, too, obtained merited encouragement from the large audience.

    4

    "Harry Carlson, organist, was one of the major reasons for the success of the entertainment. The chorus was fine, producing an excellent massed tone-quality, executing the difficult colorature passages deftly and correctly, and at all times exhibiting a commendable technique."

    p.11. The Swedish Choral Club's Christmas concert, Sunday evening in Orchestra Hall, was given before a packed house, which was very generous with its applause. The program was very appropriate ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 a, III B 3 b
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 06, 1927
    Popular Lectures at the Art Institute and Other Events of the Polish Arts Club

    (Edited by the program committee and issued as often as necessary for members and friends of the Polish Arts Club).

    The club was organized for the purpose of: (a) Promoting fellowship between Poles and Americans interested in the fine arts. (b) Providing and facilitating its members' enjoyment of the arts. (c) Joint study of literature and art. (d) Promoting the knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of art and literature. (e) Making Polish Art and literature better known in the United States.

    The program committee spared no effort in arranging all programs to meet with our purpose. It appreciates the cooperation of members, and welcomes your frank criticism and suggestions. It would like to plan programs six or more months in advance, but this cannot be done until financial support is greater.

    Lectures will take place as follows: Mondays, at 7:P.M. "The Enjoyment of Architecture." Thursdays, at 7:P.M. "The Art Institute Collections." Saturdays, at 2:P.M.(2nd and 4th) "The Enjoyment of the Visual Arts." Courses will be resumed the first week of January. Free lectures will be given by Mr. Lorado Taft, every Sunday at 5:30 P.M. in Fullerton hall, at the Art Institute.

    2

    Sunday, January 9, at 3:30 P.M. sharp, a business meeting will be held in the club room of the Art Institute. See list of amendments to be presented for adoption. The budget for 1927 will be discussed. Sunday, January 9, at 4:P.M., there will be a lecture on "Modern Polish Literature" by Dr. M. J. Kostrzewski. Sunday, January 9, at 5:30 P.M. Supper, at the Art Institute Cafeteria. The dinner and social hour at the Canton Tea Garden will be omitted because of other entertainments in the evening. Sunday, January 9, at 8:P.M. an Opera Party, will see "Martha" with Tito Schipa, Florence MacBeth, and Irene Pavloska, in the principle roles. This is a private party, under the auspices of the Northwestern University.

    January 9, at 8:P.M. at the club room in the Polish Alma Mater Building, 1643 Milwaukee Avenue, near North Avenue, a meeting will be held for the purpose of organizing the Polish University students and graduates. Dr. Z. Kurnikowski, and others have been invited to take part in the program. We have, already had one meeting, last month, at which a number of our members were present. The outlook for a good organization is promising. Any one interested, is welcome.

    On January 16, 8:15 P.M., a Piano recital will be given by Mieceslaus Ziolkowski. Sunday, February 13, at 4:P.M. Dr. Thaddeus Mitana, formerly of the University of Cracow, now at the University of Michigan, will lecture on "Polish Culture from the Historical Standpoint."

    3

    The lecture, and the supper following, will be under the joint auspices of our club and the Promien Society.

    Wednesday Evening, February 23, at 8:P.M. the Annual Chicago Concert of the Philadelphia Orchestra, will be given. Leopold Stokowski is the conductor.

    (Edited by the program committee and issued as often as necessary for members and friends of the Polish Arts Club). The club was organized for the purpose of: (a) Promoting ...

    Polish
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g, II A 3 b, II A 3 c, IV
  • Abendpost -- January 07, 1927
    The German War Veterans.

    Shortly after the conclusion of the Franco-German war of 1870-71, many of the combatants emigrated to the United States; about 500 of these came to Chicago. Only about 45 of them are still alive. Most of them were successful and lived comfortably. But others, because of sickness, fate, and old age, became completely destitute and incapacitated for work. Therefore a benevolent fund was established, which is managed by an executive committee, consisting of seven prominent citizens, six members of the German war veterans union of Chicago, and five members of the old veterans union. Ever since, a big and dignified festival is given annually, the profits of which are turned over to the management of the benevolent fund. The first of these festivals was held 15 years ago and the amount of $10,000 was raised and distributed among the suffering. At that time 258 veterans were living, now only 15 are left and the youngest of them is 78 years old. Of the patrons, who were always willing to help a good cause, several have died during the last year. Therefore, the German people of Chicago are requested to appear on January 20th in great numbers at the Germania Club. The admission fee will be one dollar. There will be no dancing, no collection will be taken up, but there will be excellent singing and instrumental performances, a festival speech, prologues, and so forth.

    Shortly after the conclusion of the Franco-German war of 1870-71, many of the combatants emigrated to the United States; about 500 of these came to Chicago. Only about 45 of ...

    German
    III B 2, II D 10, III G, I G
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 07, 1927
    Children's Holiday

    The children's holiday which was celebrated in the Union parish by the Stock Yards was a great success and attracted a great many Russian and Ukrainian residents of that district. The holiday was directed by the Reverend M. Kozinak, who made a speech to the children, stressing the necessity of respect for the older people and parents. Then a choir, consisting of sixty children, directed by Mr. George Tatarov, sung several songs. In conclusion a play, "Saint Nicholas," was performed, and souvenirs to the children were given.

    The children's holiday which was celebrated in the Union parish by the Stock Yards was a great success and attracted a great many Russian and Ukrainian residents of that district. ...

    Russian
    III B 3 b, II B 1 a
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 07, 1927
    Lecture on Modern Polish Literature

    Dr. M. J. Kostrzewski will deliver a lecture on "Modern Polish Literature" on Sunday January 9, at 4 P.M. in the club room of the Art Institute, on Michigan Avenue at Adams Street, under the auspices of the Polish Arts Club. The public is cordially invited. There is no admission charge. This lecture will be of special interest to our young people who do not have the opportunity to become familiar with Polish literature. The lecturer will speak in English, and review books on Polish Literature which have been published in the English language; so that Americans, interested in this work, may benefit thereby. Very interesting data may be obtained in this way. Prior to the lecture, at 3:30 P.M. there will be a meeting of the members of the club. Later in the evening the members will attend a special performance of the Opera "Martha" given for the benefit of the students, faculty and friends of Northwestern University. Others are planning to be present at the meeting for the purpose of organizing a club for students and graduates of Universities. This meeting will be held at the Polish Alma Mater Building, 1643 Milwaukee Ave., at 8 P. M.

    On Monday evening, January 10th, members and friends will attend a performance at the Goodman Memorial theatre, Monroe Street and Outer Drive. Miss Jane Palczynaki has charge of the party.

    Dr. M. J. Kostrzewski will deliver a lecture on "Modern Polish Literature" on Sunday January 9, at 4 P.M. in the club room of the Art Institute, on Michigan Avenue ...

    Polish
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g, II A 3 b