The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- January 07, 1927
    Prohibition (Editorial)

    There are few American problems which concern the Hungarian people as much as does the question of prohibition. We Hungarians have been broadminded in regard to the question of alcohol and its use from the time we were born, even though we saw the bad effects of alcoholism. But at the same time the Hungarian-Americans cannot understand why light wines should be prohibited. It seems rather unfair that the Volstead Act was enacted without some of us having had something to say about it. The enforcement of the Volstead Act is becoming more stringent each day.

    The government has gone so far as to poison alcohol so that anyone who drinks it, condemns himself to death for breaking a law.

    The few who are observing the Volstead Act are doing so only because they believe it will be repealed soon. The people who have followed this 2prohibition question very closely realize that repeal is hardly possible at the present time.

    The absolute enforcement of prohibition is practically impossible.

    The owners of hotels and large cafes in Chicago are against this law, but they do not dare break it.

    American business is a against it and every sober-minded person has protested against prohibition, but it is the law and they do not dare break it.

    This prohibition condition being so unsettled, we feel that we have a duty to perform. We advocate that the laws of the country should be obeyed. We have always been for what is right. We believe that the Volstead Act is unjustifiable, and [that] it deprives individuals of personal liberties. But we also believe that the excessive use of alcohol is detrimental to the user, as well as to society as a whole. This is not only true about 3the alcohol which is manufactured scientifically, but we must consider the harm brought about by alcohol manufactured in homes and [under]other unsanitary conditions; the alcohol manufactured this way probably means death after it has been used for a certain length of time.

    We want to call the attention of leaders of societies and churches to one fact. We are well aware of the fact that when these organizations run affairs, alcoholic drinks are liable to be served, and if these organizations are caught doing so, they are liable to arrest. We have been informed that the prohibition agents are going to pay more attention to these affairs , sponsored by societies and churches, to see that the prohibition law is strictly enforced. These affairs can be run successfully without breaking any laws. One evening of Hungarian entertainment where alcoholic beverages are sold, can rain the good Hungarian make to an extent where this rain can't be repaired by ten other lawful evenings of entertainment.

    We want to say again that we are not picking on any individual organization 4or person because we are not reformers. All we are doing is warning our Hungarian organizations to avoid situations which may become embarrassing.

    Up to date we have not encountered any trouble with the law-enforcing bodies and we hope we will not have any trouble in the future.

    Those who do not like the Volstead Act should fight against it. We ourselves advocate the modification of it. The United States is a democratic country, and the people here have a right to voice their opinions.

    We Hungarian-American citizens have the right to voice our opinions openly. We have the same right that any other American citizen has, but we must be brave and sincere.

    There are few American problems which concern the Hungarian people as much as does the question of prohibition. We Hungarians have been broadminded in regard to the question of alcohol ...

    Hungarian
    I B 2, I C, I H
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 07, 1927
    Lecture on Modern Polish Literature

    Dr. M. J. Kostrzewski will deliver a lecture on "Modern Polish Literature" on Sunday January 9, at 4 P.M. in the club room of the Art Institute, on Michigan Avenue at Adams Street, under the auspices of the Polish Arts Club. The public is cordially invited. There is no admission charge. This lecture will be of special interest to our young people who do not have the opportunity to become familiar with Polish literature. The lecturer will speak in English, and review books on Polish Literature which have been published in the English language; so that Americans, interested in this work, may benefit thereby. Very interesting data may be obtained in this way. Prior to the lecture, at 3:30 P.M. there will be a meeting of the members of the club. Later in the evening the members will attend a special performance of the Opera "Martha" given for the benefit of the students, faculty and friends of Northwestern University. Others are planning to be present at the meeting for the purpose of organizing a club for students and graduates of Universities. This meeting will be held at the Polish Alma Mater Building, 1643 Milwaukee Ave., at 8 P. M.

    On Monday evening, January 10th, members and friends will attend a performance at the Goodman Memorial theatre, Monroe Street and Outer Drive. Miss Jane Palczynaki has charge of the party.

    Dr. M. J. Kostrzewski will deliver a lecture on "Modern Polish Literature" on Sunday January 9, at 4 P.M. in the club room of the Art Institute, on Michigan Avenue ...

    Polish
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g, II A 3 b
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 07, 1927
    Children's Holiday

    The children's holiday which was celebrated in the Union parish by the Stock Yards was a great success and attracted a great many Russian and Ukrainian residents of that district. The holiday was directed by the Reverend M. Kozinak, who made a speech to the children, stressing the necessity of respect for the older people and parents. Then a choir, consisting of sixty children, directed by Mr. George Tatarov, sung several songs. In conclusion a play, "Saint Nicholas," was performed, and souvenirs to the children were given.

    The children's holiday which was celebrated in the Union parish by the Stock Yards was a great success and attracted a great many Russian and Ukrainian residents of that district. ...

    Russian
    III B 3 b, II B 1 a
  • Danish Times -- January 07, 1927
    Ha Ha-Revyen-Dansk Tidende, 1892-1927

    In a newspaper office, the New Year means no more than anywhere else, but our newspapers go back into the past with its mileposts that denote either success or failure.

    The older members of the colony will remember the humorous paper Ha Ha that was edited by Volkmar Johnson in 1892. It wasn't much of a paper, the contents could easily fill just one page of the Danish Times..... There wasn't much news, but sometimes the "big shots" in the colony would get some very "satirical" publicity.....

    In 1896, Mr. C. Botker bought Ha Ha. The name was later changed to Revyen 2(The Review)..... Botker did not have an easy job; there was much financial trouble, but nevertheless the Revyen lasted twenty-five years..... His knowledge and ability as a journalist gave the Revyen a good name.

    In 1921, Botker sold the paper to Frank Philipson.

    The name of the paper was then changed again and it became the Dansk Tidende (Danish Times). A stock company was formed which published the newspaper for several years, until 1925, when the stock company dissolved and the newspaper was bought by a partnership.

    In a newspaper office, the New Year means no more than anywhere else, but our newspapers go back into the past with its mileposts that denote either success or failure. ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 1, IV
  • Scandia -- January 08, 1927
    Health (Editorial)

    To have and to hold health is our divine heritage. There is no greater wealth than health. Our efforts should be directed intelligently to obtain the blessed state of health and harmony. All else is secondary to mental alertness and physical perfection. Let us take full advantage of Nature's abundant gifts, thus adding years to life, and life to years.

    Let us be temperate in all things. Keep our thoughts clean, blood red, muscles hard, digestion good, body erect, nerves steady. Work with a will to do; play when the work is through. Build on a foundation of contentment and goodness. Establish a reserve fund of health and happiness, for a health reserve is more important than a wealth reserve.

    All these things are within the reach of everyone, but the knowledge that 2they exist has been made possible by the use of these columns. We extend to you, our readers, and your dear ones, our very best wishes for healthy bodies and a happy home--the fruitage of right doing and right living.

    May these blessings accompany you during the year 1927.

    To have and to hold health is our divine heritage. There is no greater wealth than health. Our efforts should be directed intelligently to obtain the blessed state of health ...

    Norwegian
    I M, II B 2 d 1
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 08, 1927
    Answer to America Echo

    America Echo, an organ of Protestantism in America, is conductive in a mental audit of the financial affairs of the Pope.

    1. America Echo has not the slightest idea of the Pope's wealth.

    2. From a journalistic point of view pursuing such a subject has no significance. Only a journalist with a limited inteligence will point out the errors of the Pope.

    America Echo, an organ of Protestantism in America, is conductive in a mental audit of the financial affairs of the Pope. 1. America Echo has not the slightest idea of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 2, III C
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- January 08, 1927
    Behavior of Parents Toward Children and Vice Versa

    Communications from the Polish Welfare Association, tell us that many volumes can be written on the aforementioned subject, outlining the causes, of discordant situations of parents. In many homes, parents resort to very strict disciplinary measures, which have often been inherited; and which, however, basically correct are not practical, and cannot be adapted to conditions and children of today.

    Times and conditions have changed, therefore,obsolete ideas of strict discipline which were adopted in the average home, with effective results now produce confusion, chaos and lack of understanding in our growing children. This misunderstanding is often the cause of permanent delinquency. In the course of daily events we note that parents do not have sufficient will power to adequately govern their own children. Therefore, in a temperamental rage, and a desire to punish, they take the problems of their own children to the police station, or Juvenile Court.

    It is pathetic to see newspapers with headlines, or articles, relating the fact that Polish children were brought before the court at the request of their own parents; emphasizing to other nationalities, the lack of domestic management among Poles.

    2

    Example: 1 -

    A father came to the Juvenile Court and requested that his 10 year-old son be arrested, because he had stolen money from him, and ran away from home. After an investigation it was proved that the boy asked his father for a few pennies, on Sunday, to attend a movie, the father, however, refused because financial circumstances would not permit. Thus, in his desire to be near his chums, who were going to the movies, he resorted to petty larceny. Money was left carelessly lying, on the table, in full view of the child, creating a natural temptation. Because of a false fear for the safety of the boy, the father rushed to the police station to report this incident. Who is at fault? We shall not underline it; but it is good material for serious thought.

    Example: 2 -

    A mother brought a charge against an 18 year-old son in the Boys' Court. Fortunately, an investigator of Polish origin, and connected with the Polish Welfare Association happened to be at the hearing and inquired of the mother the reason, for the action. It was apparent that her son Stephen, who worked nights in a bakery earning $30.00 per week, had been reading literature of a questionable text which brought about 3misunderstanding and quarrels, and finally caused him to leave home, and live with his friends. It justly angered the mother, who, instead of dealing in the matter sensibly, or seeking advice of confidential friends, sought satisfaction in the Juvenile Court, with the definite intention of having him committed to a reformatory.

    What would have been the fate of this boy, had not the Polish Welfare Association taken an interest in his case. Without a doubt he would be compelled to serve a sentence in a reformatory for an unjust reason, thereby destroying forever his love and respect for his parents. In a series of conferences with the boy and his mother, through skilful investigation, he returned to his home, and amended his behavior: and we believe that he will become a law abiding citizen. Thanks to the effort of the Polish Welfare Association.

    The excellent accomplishments, which were the result of hard labor of the Polish Welfare Association are vividly portrayed in the above examples. The field of the settlements is vast, therefore, we need financial strength, to create a strong association, and to enlighten the Poles in regard to domestic problems. Let us not hesitate in securing membership to the Association for the low sum of $3.00 per year; we may salvage some poor Polish child from a bitter fate.

    Communications from the Polish Welfare Association, tell us that many volumes can be written on the aforementioned subject, outlining the causes, of discordant situations of parents. In many homes, parents ...

    Polish
    I B 3 b, II E 3, II D 1
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 08, 1927
    Business.

    Mr. Karzas, the owner of the Trianon and Aragon Ball Rooms and many theaters, will contribute to the progress of our city with the erection of a new ball room.

    Mr. Karzas, the owner of the Trianon and Aragon Ball Rooms and many theaters, will contribute to the progress of our city with the erection of a new ball room.

    Greek
    II A 2, II F
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 08, 1927
    Christmas Parties

    The author of the article expresses his opinion about the arrangement of Christmas parties for Russian children and adults, and their aim.

    It is true, the author says, that here in America it is not so easy to excite the interest of the Russian children for the Russian customs and rites. It must be taken into consideration that the children are being brought up in a foreign country, do not know the correct English language, have very little sympathy with their parents and all that is Russian. That is why the parents and teachers of the Russian schools for children must endeavor, when planning the children's holidays and amusements, to inculcate upon their children the Russian rites, habits, and customs. Visiting a certain Christmas party the author noticed that 2the organizers strove to do their best by arranging for the children many amusements, occupying them with gay games and giving them toys and candy. Then the author draws a picture of the condition of Russian children, somewhere on the west shores of the Pacific Ocean, in a half savage country, in a land inhabited by the yellow race of people, where the children are sheltered in dark, cold Chinese phansas (houses). The children are barefoot, without clothes, and hungry, and always in need of a piece of dry bread. "We Russian people," adds the author of the article, "parents, teachers, and trustees of the Russian schools for children in America, striving to give our children the best amusements and pleasures, should not forget the unfortunate children who don't know pleasure and light, and continually live in poverty." The Committee for Aid to Russian Poor Children in Chicago accepts contributions in money, clothes, and shoes.

    The author of the article expresses his opinion about the arrangement of Christmas parties for Russian children and adults, and their aim. It is true, the author says, that here ...

    Russian
    III A, III B 3 b, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, II D 10
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- January 08, 1927
    (No headline)

    The New Church of the North Division.

    The Churchgoers of the New Church were honored by the presence of "The Most Rev. Bishop Philaretos." The tremendous crowd participating in the celebration of Epiphany were very much impressed by the dignity and profound words of Bishop Philaretos. The Bishop ordered the immediate formation of Sunday School classes for the children, and urged the parents to send their children to the newly created Sunday School, so they would be imbued with the religious and moral principles of the Orthodox Church.

    The New Church of the North Division. The Churchgoers of the New Church were honored by the presence of "The Most Rev. Bishop Philaretos." The tremendous crowd participating in the ...

    Greek
    III C, III B 3 b, II B 2 f