The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Radnik -- January 03, 1925
    Milan Glumac Jurisic, the First Jugoslav Revolutionary in America

    It was in the year 1907, at the time of the great crisis which shook capitalist America, that many predicted a revolution of the masses. In those times a small group of workers came together in Allegheny, Pa. (the present city of Pittsburg) to start a campaign against the enemies of the outlawed poor and against the capitalistic system.

    Being connected by the Social Democratic Party of Croatia at Zagreb and not having among themselves able leaders and organizers, they wrote to the Central at Zagreb to send them a leader. For that purpose a collection of $94.25 was made for traveling expenses. A workers' paper was to be published but there was no editor available.

    At that time there lived in Croatia a young man who was in the way of many of the leaders of the labor movement. He was a Social-Democrat, but quite different from all other leaders. The working men liked him, 2the authorities hated him, other leaders disliked him. Keen, but clever; a born revolutionary, he was driven from place to place. He was not wanted by anybody, until finally he was drafted into the army. He was Milan Glumac.

    For his own good as well as that of the Socialist Party, Glumac was chosen to go to America and start Socialist propaganda among Jugoslav workers. Glumac wrote to his comrades in America: "Dear Comrades: The Central Committee of the Socialist Party wants me to go to America. I accept because of my personal situation and your needs. It will help the movement and myself to evade the army into which I was drafted though sick. We will work shoulder to shoulder against capitalism. I am ready to come."

    A few months later Milan Glumac was in America. At a meeting for publishing a Croatian workingmen's newspaper, the Radnicka Straza, he said: "Comrades! Contemplating in this short time the life of our immigrants, I came to the very sad conclusion that the worst elements among them are their leaders, who are the meanest frauds, the boldest adventurers, bearers of stupidity and immoral outcasts. With such leadership our people is doomed. They are ready to commit any crime against the immigrant, 3without remorse or feeling of responsibility. That means it is our duty to enlighten and to organize the Croatian workers in the Socialist ranks. Be not deceived, that will not be an easy matter, but against capitalism and its servants we must lead an unmerciful fight.

    All were in accord with the above statements. Glumac moved from Allegheny to Chicago, where a Socialist branch was also organized. A short time after, on December 25, 1907, the first number of Radnicka Straza was published.

    On its first page was a fiery proclamation addressed to the Croatian immigrants written by the editor, Milan Glumac.

    The closing words of the proclamation were: "Workmen, outlawed brethren! Turn from you adventurers who represent themselves as patriots but in fact are for capitalism and fraud. Long enough you have been cheated by them. Take your fate in your own hands. Join a great circle of working men. Take care of yourselves. Do not allow wolves to take care of the sheep.

    4

    Radnicka Straza appears at a time of greatest misery. This newspaper was created to help wretched and miserable workers and they must support and keep it. Forward, for the holy work and justified struggle! We must not remain miserables and slaves forever. Forward! Subscribe and read Radnicka Straza."

    After only a few years of strenuous work, the Jugoslav Socialist Federation grew larger, and the newspaper had more subscribers. All the work rested on Glumac. There was no money to hire co-workers. The editor and his wife shared the office of Radnicka Straza for their living quarters. The place was crowded and dark. Many persons unemployed came to the office to get warm. Life was full of misery, but Glumac never complained. When his presence was most needed he became sick with tuberculosis. That was in 1911. Glumac left to recuperate in Missouri and later in California. He returned to his dingy office, where he died January 5, 1913.

    When asked how he became tubercular, he related his life story thus:

    5

    "I was born in 1884 at Bosanski Samac. I was born of poor parents who had me learn the printing trade. That paid little and was a killing job, at least during my apprenticeship. I worked here and there and became a typesetter in Budapest, where I worked for the Narodna Rijec (People's Word), a Socialist paper. I also wrote articles and did well because I read much and did propaganda work since I was 18 years old. After that I went to Narodni Glas ( People's Voice), at Novi Sad, as editor, with the duty of going out to towns and villages to agitate. I did this work gladly. In the town of Srijem (Sirmium) I held one of my most successful meetings. From afar came peasants on wagons and on foot, under red banners. The meeting, most demonstrative in form, was calm and very dignified.

    "The next day I was taken to jail by gendarmes. Without any hearing I was told (I was) to be deported to my domicile as a person dangerous to public peace and order. On the spot I was ordered to leave, guarded by a policeman. Traveling on wagon and on foot I reached, after a long wandering, my domicile. Even the weather was against me. It was raining and cold. I was compelled to remain overnight in jail in my wet clothes 6and that was the start of my sickness."

    Milan Glumac was born as a proletarian and as such he died. After his death the newspaper Radnicka Straza did not possess the pugnacity it had under his editorship.

    Glory be to his proletarian work and honor to his ashes!

    An Old Comrade.

    It was in the year 1907, at the time of the great crisis which shook capitalist America, that many predicted a revolution of the masses. In those times a small ...

    Croatian
    II B 2 d 1, III H, I E
  • Forward -- January 04, 1925
    Mr. Eliot Warns against the Menace of Intermarriage by Nathaniel Zalowitz

    It is indeed regrettable that, despite the herculean labors of the venerable President Emeritus of Harvard University on behalf of American higher education and innumerable civic causes, radicals should know next to nothing about him, and never mention the name of Charles W. Eliot without sneering at him for having once spoken disparagingly of the organized labor movement. On the contrary, his statement that "the scab is the national hero of America" is the only blot on his escutcheon. Everything else that he has said and done during many decades has been characterized by liberality of mind and heart. American college curriculums owe more to Eliot than to any other single individual. It was he who liberalized and humanized Harvard. He has rarely failed to speak up in defense of everything that forms the creed of a liberal.

    Eliot is perhaps the last of the Brahmins. He typifies the best of the New 2England tradition. The scion of an old Yankee family, Eliot has given small comfort to "one-hundred-per-cents". He sees America not as the paradise of the Nordics but as the land of the oppressed of every clime. His sympathies have always been with the stranger knocking at our gates. Eliot is no "restrictionist," no Ku Kluxer, and no believer in the Anglo-Saxon myth of superiority; and he always has shown a peculiar understanding of the Jewish problem.

    Recently Dr. Eliot took occasion to address a group of Jewish students at Harvard. What he said was so sensible and penetrating, so kind and shrewd, that we need not take alarm because Rabbi Samuel Schulman and several Irish politicians of Boston have taken issue with Dr. Eliot. With admirable frankness and forthrightness Eliot told his listeners:

    "I have noticed with regret the increasing tendency of Jews to marry Christians. I have had an opportunity to observe intermarriages between people who are not kindred and I have never known them to turn out well. I hope that you Jews will consider that."

    3

    No truer words have ever been uttered on the subject of intermarriage. Coming from a man ripe in years and in wisdom, a gentleman and a scholar in the best sense of the term, this advice should be pondered upon and taken to heart by everyone who feels concerned over the future of the Jews in America. Dr. Eliot spoke as a friend of the Jewish race who frankly admits and admires the contribution which the Hebrews, ancient and modern, have made to the world. He does not blink at the truth. He recognizes that intermarriage is but another and less ugly name for apostasy; for intermarriage, if generally practiced, would result the total disappearance of the Jewish race. Dr. Eliot raises his voice in warning. Rabbi Schulman, the spiritual guide of the fashionable members of Congregation Beth-El, hastened to assure his wealthy listeners that the advice of Dr. Eliot need not be heeded.

    In considering the problem of intermarriage, there are, I suppose, three questions that should be answered: First, does intermarriage make for the happiness of the young people? Second, will the offspring be happy? And third, what will be the 4effect on the Jewish race? I do not want to lay down the law. It is fatuous to say that in every case intermarriage turns out badly. There is no scientific data on the subject. I doubt if there could be. Even the records of the divorce courts would not be conclusive proof. Not every marriage that lands on the rocks winds up in the divorce court. Marital happiness or unhappiness is too subtle and subjective and is hardly a subject for the statistician. Rather it is material for the pyschologist. It would be futile to deny that some mixed marriages are anything but successful. But I think that it is safe to say that in the case of a mixed marriage, all things considered, there is greater likelihood of a calamitous climax. The odds are against it, so to speak. The differences in habit and upbringing, the distinct racial backgrounds, the ties of family and religion, the manners and mannerisms, and the hundred other things that come up every day and every week bring ugly shocks--and still uglier words.

    Judaism is in our blood. Even the least religious among us is Jewish to the core. Even so, ninety-nine out of every hundred Gentiles are filled with peculiar 5prejudices and mistaken notions concerning Jews. Likes and dislikes and habits of thought and action that are the accumulation of countless centuries cannot be sloughed off. Marriages, as every one knows, are made or marred by little things--by trifles. Seemingly insignificant habits of speech or food have a way of becoming tremendously important later on.

    Moreover, one must never forget the parents and relatives of the young couple. Is the Jewish young man who marries a Christian girl prepared to break definitely and permanently with his Orthodox parents and relatives? Does he expect his Gentile in-laws to receive his bearded father or his foreign-sounding aunt on terms of equality? Can he expect his wife's aunts and uncles, not to speak of the neighbors and friends, to show him the cordiality for which he hungers? Can he promise himself never to bristle when his wife or her relatives speak contemptuously or patronizingly of any member of his race? In trying to run away from his Jewish surroundings he will discover himself to be more Jewish than he had ever suspected. He will be more race conscious--more "touchy" than ever. He will imagine insults and gibes where none were intended. This is likely to happen in 6many cases.

    Now we come to the children. How are they to be brought up? Will it be a Sunday school or a Sabbath school? Will the male child be circumcized or not? Will it be Christmas and Easter or Hanukah and Purim? In case the child dies will the father allow its body to be buried in a Christian cemetery, or will he insist upon a Jewish burial? If you think these questions are far fetched you are mistaken. If space permitted I could tell you many true stories that would make you sad. I do not say that the offspring of a mixed marriage is less virile or less brilliant than other children; but when the offspring is not one-hundred-per-cent Christian he will suffer mental and spiritual anguish. The child is torn between two worlds--between two allegiances. In many instances the child despises one of its parents when it becomes older--usually the Jewish parent. The child usually wishes to become a Christian completely but his Jewish physiognomy stands in the way. I venture to say that even a free-thinking Jew would be greatly hurt to discover that his child worships in a Christian church. A Bar Mizvah [ceremony of confirmation when a Jewish boy is thirteen years old] may prove 7unpalatable to some radical Jews, but they would find a Christian confirmation infinitely less desirable. And it may be questioned whether all of these things would tend to increase the happiness of the mixed marriage.

    It remains to be pointed out that intermarriage inevitably leads to the disintergration of the minority group. Of course those that are indifferent to the fate of the Jewish race need not trouble themselves with what Dr. Eliot has said. Judaism is a very real burden and I do not quarrel with the weak and timid souls that yearn to snuggle in the arms of the church. Let them go their way. But let it be understood that intermarriage is the less heroic method of abandoning the Jewish nation for the flesh pots of Egypt. There have been Jewish apostates in every age, and no tears have been shed over them. I believe that apostasy in any form is furthest from the thought or wish of American Jewry. If American Jewry is to continue to live and have its own existence intermarriage must be frowned upon. To condone mixed marriages, as Reverend Schulman has seen fit to do, is to invite disaster for the Jewish race. Dr. Eliot deserves the commendation of every right-thinking Jew for his brave and necessary counsel.

    It is indeed regrettable that, despite the herculean labors of the venerable President Emeritus of Harvard University on behalf of American higher education and innumerable civic causes, radicals should know ...

    Jewish
    III A
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1925
    North Side Turner Hall Concert.

    Yesterday's concert of the Philharmonic orchestra in the North Side Turner Hall, under the aegis of the Chicago Turner Society, was well attended. Besides the predominating German audience, many Anglo-Americans and representatives of other nationalities were present, which serves as the best proof that the popular Sunday afternoon concerts receive well deserved appreciation in wider circles all the time.

    The program contained a tasty selection of light, pleasant melodious music, which received general acclamation. After a stirring opening March of Sousa, "Semper Fidelis", Weber's romantic ever youthful "Euryanthe Overture" was played, positively the most musically valuable of the 12 numbers. Unanimous applause was given for cleverly arranged tunes from a number of modern operettas by Roberts, the rousing march "Espana" by Waldteufel and a hunting scene by Bucalosi. Mr. Howard Preston, as soloist sang four arias and ballads. Preston is not a newcomer, but an experienced concert singer, who not only enjoys an enviable reputation in Chicago, but also is known in the prominent circles of Europe.

    2

    A striking proof of his understanding was given with the difficult aria "Vision Fair" from Masseuet's "Heriodode". During the latter part of the concert, he sang three beautiful songs, "All Saints", by Strauss, Kann's "The Victor" and Giblert's "Pirate Song". The conductor Fritz Renk, in conjuction with Franz Polesney performed Lange's often heard "grandmother" for two violins. The melodious, but otherwise not very outstanding composition of the well known composer met with great applause. Played by two artists on the violin, the piece sounded as if it had been clad in a new dress.

    Yesterday's concert of the Philharmonic orchestra in the North Side Turner Hall, under the aegis of the Chicago Turner Society, was well attended. Besides the predominating German audience, many Anglo-Americans ...

    German
    II A 3 b, II B 1 a, III B 2, I C
  • Vilnis -- January 06, 1925
    Lenin's Writings in Lithuanian Language

    Summary:

    Benefit from a good opportunity. He who is late will be sorry. He who does not read Lenin's writings cannot be a good communist. Lenin's writings must be found in all workers organizations and libraries, also in the house of every workingman.

    Comrades, donate all you can to the Lenin Literary Fund. The Lithuanian Workers Printing Society is publishing in the Lithuanian language Lenin's selected writings. It intends to publish ten books. These writings of Lenin are being translated into the Lithuanian language.

    Summary: Benefit from a good opportunity. He who is late will be sorry. He who does not read Lenin's writings cannot be a good communist. Lenin's writings must be found ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 3, I E
  • Abendpost -- January 07, 1925
    German Press Association. Family Evening.

    The family evening of the German Press Association, in its locality, the Chicago Lincoln Club, was a very pleasant affair. The program consisted in a bunco game, for which a number of pretty prizes were donated by the executive amusement committee, followed by entertainment.

    Mr. Martin Ballmann, president of the amusement committee, succeeded in securing the collaboration of a number of artists. Miss Marion Waterford and Miss Ruth Axe Brown, received great applause for their singing. Mr. Conrad A. Reinhold proved to be a great artist on the violin; Misses Maria Dreier and Olive Dryer played the piano, and Miss Dell Hinshaw and Mr. Leopold Saltiel, one of the association's members, presented some really interesting discourses.

    The family evening of the German Press Association, in its locality, the Chicago Lincoln Club, was a very pleasant affair. The program consisted in a bunco game, for which a ...

    German
    II A 1, II B 2 d 1, II B 1 a, IV
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 08, 1925
    Amateur Wrestling.

    The Swedish-American Athletic Association's Annual tournament for amateur wrestlers commences Saturday, Jan. 10th, 7:00 P.M. The tournament, which is open to all amateurs in Illinois, has drawn contestants from the foremost local wrestling clubs as well as from Joliet, Waukegan, and other towns. From all indications it promises to be the outstanding wrestling event of the season.

    The 1924 Championship went to the present sponsors, (the "Swedish-American Athletic Association") who,no doubt will try their best to retain the title.

    All classes will be represented all the way from 112 pounds up to heavyweights. The bouts will be held in the Club's gymnasium, 752 Barry Avenue, cor. N. Clark street.

    The Swedish-American Athletic Association's Annual tournament for amateur wrestlers commences Saturday, Jan. 10th, 7:00 P.M. The tournament, which is open to all amateurs in Illinois, has drawn contestants from the ...

    Swedish
    II B 3
  • Chicago Chronicle -- January 09, 1925
    Editorial. the Unfortunate Visa-Holders.

    Three Chicagoans recently made a journey to Washington to present a petition to the President on the behalf of the stranded Jewish immigrants. They were Abraham Liebling, A. B. Messer, and Herman Elenbogen. Their connections with official Washington and the close acquaintance-ship of the first two with Mr. Coolidge gave them a valuable entree. They succeeded in laying before the President the plight of those would-be immigrants who had been given their visas, broken up their homes and made ready to come to America, only to be stopped by the quota restrictions.

    Much is to be hoped for from the efforts of these gentlemen. In the meantime, however, other Jewish bodies have expressed their disapproval of this "freelancing" junket. With our Chicago gentlemen asking the President for one thing, the Marshall group petitioning Congress and the Courts for another, and P. O. W. and like organizations making efforts in still other directions, the result is sure to be harmful, say the Eastern leaders. And yet, if Messrs. Liebling, Messer, and Elenbogen should suceed in opening the President's eyes to the injustice that America is perpetrating on invitees to this country, they will have done more than has so far been accomplished by powerful Jewish bodies in years of work.

    Three Chicagoans recently made a journey to Washington to present a petition to the President on the behalf of the stranded Jewish immigrants. They were Abraham Liebling, A. B. Messer, ...

    Jewish
    III G, I C
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 09, 1925
    Will There Be a New Hungary? (Editorial)

    The opening of a new year provokes many questions regarding the future of that orphaned and crippled homeland of ours.

    We find that these questions are natural. We do not believe that there is a single person amongst us who does not feel that he should take an interest in the affairs of the government of his native land.

    At the same time, regardless of how much we would like to picture the Hungarian situation as a rosy one, the facts do not fool anyone who thinks seriously.

    We must remember that in 1914, at the beginning of the World War, we knew that we would create many enemies by saying that the War would be disastrous 2to Hungary because regardless of who won, Hungary would lose. We admit that many times we in America wished that our prophesies might be wrong, because we still possess the Hungarian spirit. It is sad but our prophesy came true.

    Now we must speak and answer the question, will there be a new Hungary? The answer is distressing; there will not be a new Hungary. The only possible way that a new Hungary could be born would be for her to completely wipe out the present form of government and replace it with one that is totally democratic and guarantees the liberty of all citizens.

    The most unfortunate fact is that in those territories which have been taken from Hungary, the school teachers and other public officials fled and deserted the Hungarian people who live there. If these people had remained and maintained their integrity as well as that of the rest of the people, the time would have come when the people could have freed themselves.

    We read that the Turks set on the necks of the Hungarian people for one 3hundred and fifty years. This is historical truth. But the Turks did not try to make a Mohamedan territory out of Hungary. The Turks were not interestedF in the people--they wanted the taxes. The Turks realized that this situation would end someday, and when that day came, they would have to get out of Hungary. The day came, and they left--fully satisfied that Allah wanted it that way.

    Today most of the nations [gap] have taken [gap] of un[gap]Hungary do not accept Turkish fatalism. The Slavish-speaking people especially are very impressive. They know that the strength of the people lies in education, therefore they are not stressing the building of churches. They say that the only time they need a priest is when they die.

    Can you or anyone else believe that those Hungarians in the ceded territories [gap]

    If the Hungarian government wants to retain the respect of the Hungarians 4scattered throughout the world she must render services that are far superior to those of these foreign governments. If the Hungarian-Americans expect aid from the American people, it will be up to us to see that those who are in Hungary receive bread, land and civil rights. This must be done with due legality using the Bethlen-Horthy procedure.

    Further the Hungarian-American press must cease its espionage tactics. When these things are done we can discuss problems of integrity.

    But to ask Hungarian-Americans to shoulder the burden of the abuses of the Bethlen-Horthy government is out of the question.

    Therefore we Hungarian-Americans are still wondering whether there will be a new Hungary.

    The opening of a new year provokes many questions regarding the future of that orphaned and crippled homeland of ours. We find that these questions are natural. We do not ...

    Hungarian
    III H, II B 2 d 1, I G, I C
  • Vilnis -- January 13, 1925
    Chronicle

    The distribution of our press is the main problem at the present moment. It is about the greatest Communist problem. This line of work is considerably neglected. It is true that the branches have elected agent-committees, but the majority of them remain only on paper.

    Last year in Chicago we started to work with energy in the distribution of the press. At that time Comrade Jukelis worked as commissar of the press and the results were good.

    The distribution of our press is the main problem at the present moment. It is about the greatest Communist problem. This line of work is considerably neglected. It is true ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Vilnis -- January 13, 1925
    Proletarian Art Appearing in Vilnis Every Second Tuesday from Central Bureau

    The time set for the election of the officers of the Central Bureau of Administration is at its close. Have all branches, such as choirs, dramatic clubs, circles, and "The Bud of Flower Society," voted in this election? If not, do so, as the Central Bureau wants to publish the correct and actual report.

    The new songs are ready. Each choir affiliated with the Arts Alliance, which paid its annual dues for 1924, will receive these new songs entirely free. Distribution of these songs will start within two weeks, but if secretaries of choirs, etc., have given their correct addresses to the Central Bureau and the songs are not received by January 24, write to the Central Bureau about it.

    2

    "Budding Flower of Youth Society" members belonging to the American-Lithuanian Alliance of Proletarian Art, will receive free a copy of the theatrical play, "The Winner is Labor." They will also receive a few copies of the new songs. This theatrical play is not hard to learn. Additional books of this play are 30c each.

    To theatrical clubs or dramatic circles we can give nothing at present. We have tried hard to prepare some plays, but for certain reasons we were unable to publish them.

    For the following season we will have a whole line of very good and nice plays, as friends of "Letpropoets" (Lithuanian Proletarian Poets) have sent us a whole bunch of dramas and comedies in Russian, part of which the Central Bureau has decided to translate, and about mid-summer we will try to publish them.

    3

    The Central Bureau was unable to function properly because last year was a year of organization. The program for the year of 1925 will be published later. The Central Bureau is ready with new plays and a better fundamental study of proletarian art for the year of 1925. It is also ready to bring proletarian art into life, and by this to wage a bitter struggle against the "white" art. The Bureau anticipates the increase of membership in our Alliance.

    The next issue of Vilnis will be very interesting. Everyone should read our publications. In this issue will be published articles of prominent writers, such as V. Zalionis and P. Aushrotas, from Russia. Other friends of our Alliance are invited to write to our publications.

    (signed) J. Pakaushis

    10831 Indiana Avenue

    Chicago.

    The time set for the election of the officers of the Central Bureau of Administration is at its close. Have all branches, such as choirs, dramatic clubs, circles, and "The ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1, II B 2 d 1, I E