The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Forward -- January 02, 1919
    (No headline)

    The Naturalization Legal Aid Bureau of The Chicago Civic Centre will have a meeting today, from 1:30 to 10 P. M. This notice is for the benefit of our Chicago Jews, to assist them in application for naturalization papers.

    The Naturalization Legal Aid Bureau of The Chicago Civic Centre will have a meeting today, from 1:30 to 10 P. M. This notice is for the benefit of our Chicago ...

    Jewish
    II D 7
  • Forward -- January 02, 1919
    Jewish Co-Operative Workers Association

    A Board of Directors meeting of the Co-Operative Association will be held this evening at our office, 1129 Ashland Blvd. We have some very important business to transact.

    I. Schwartz.

    Rec. Sec'y.

    A Board of Directors meeting of the Co-Operative Association will be held this evening at our office, 1129 Ashland Blvd. We have some very important business to transact. I. Schwartz. ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 c
  • Ukraina -- January 02, 1919
    The Newspaper Ukraina Is to Become the Property of the Federation of Ukrainians

    At the general meeting of the shareholders of the Ukrainian Publishing Company in Chicago, on the 25th of December 1918, in the hall at Erie and Robey Streets, Dr. Stephen Hryniewiecky and Mr. P. Radyk (from Canada) moved to sell the newspaper Ukraina, together with the printing shop and with all its machinery and stock, to the Federation of Ukrainians for the sum that was owned by the company; and this was passed unanimously.

    The remaining debt of the company amounts to $1,800. All the shareholders present at the meeting moved and accepted that they leave their shares for the good of the Federation of Ukrainians. Among the present share-owners there are a great many who have shares in larger amounts: $100, $150, $200, $250, and $300. They voluntarily and willingly obligated themselves to leave their shares for the good of the Federation of Ukrainians under one condition: That the newspaper Ukraina, a future committee organ 2of the Federation, would be issued in Chicago.

    At the general meeting of the share owners, it was recommended also that the directors of the company speed up the transactions with the executive committee of the Federation.

    Those present represented more than two thirds of the shareholders of the Ukrainian Publishing Company.

    At the general meeting of the shareholders of the Ukrainian Publishing Company in Chicago, on the 25th of December 1918, in the hall at Erie and Robey Streets, Dr. Stephen ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 2 d 1, III B 2
  • Forward -- January 02, 1919
    (No headline)

    Here is a notice to all workers of radical organizations: The next Aldermanic Campaign in the 15th, ward is not very far off and now is the right time for all workers organizations of the N.W. side to start their activities.

    Aside from the importance of agitation and propaganda, we have now before us the very important problem of the election of our Socialist candidate, the Honorable Mr. Engdhal.

    With this object in view, we ask you to call a Jewish Socialist conference and all socialist and other radical organizations of the N. W. Side to meet on Sunday Janurary 12th, at the headquarters of the 15th Ward branch Socialist Party, 1148 N. Campbell Ave.

    We invite your organizations to assist us in this important conference. You are to elect two delegates to the conference.

    N. W. Side Jewish Branch Socialist Party.

    S. Waldman.

    Secretary.

    Here is a notice to all workers of radical organizations: The next Aldermanic Campaign in the 15th, ward is not very far off and now is the right time for ...

    Jewish
    I E, I F 1, I F 2
  • Abendpost -- January 03, 1919
    Matrimony--A Fifty-Fifty Proposition! (Editorial)

    The old story that, when trains arrived in Chicago, the conductors used to shout "Five-minute stop for marriages and divorces!" has a much more serious foundation than many people would believe. The carelessness with which a man and a girl contract a "union for life" and the thoughtless haste with which they shake off the fetters of matrimony whenever it seems convenient to do so, seriously endangers the institution of the family, which is the ethical foundation of all nations, including our own. The disastrous consequences of a couple's separation will only in rare cases be limited to themselves. Judge Hoffmann, presiding in the Cincinnati Court of Domestic Relations, declared recently that, according to a careful estimate, a full third of the children in our country have divorced parents; and that it was also 2a fact that from the ranks of these children more juvenile delinquents were recruited than from the ranks of those whose father and mother had died. It is not difficult to see the cause for this peculiar fact, typical of the great cities.

    To combat the evil of juvenile delinquency effectively, one has to strike at the root, which lies, undoubtedly, in a family life degenerated more and more by the divorce evil. Where parental care and domestic discipline are lacking, children certainly will grow up without any moral backbone and the way to a life of crime is paved in one's youth. The public school, with a staff composed almost entirely of female teachers, cannot replace the good influence of a home where love and order reign, especially when it is a question of curbing the adventurous spirit or bad tendencies of older boys. The legislature in Springfield will have to occupy itself during the coming session with changes in the state divorce law, which, by the way, are also 3recommended by several women's organizations. Strange as it seems, the intention is to make divorces easier to obtain, not harder. The proposed measures, for instance, would make neglect of one's home grounds for divorce, and would reduce the time of desertion necessary for divorce from two years to one year, and the time of habitual drunkenness, also, from two years to one year. A local judge warns against the adoption of these measures, pointing out that experience has shown that every relaxation of the divorce laws, or increase in grounds for divorce, serves as an encouragement for divorce. Unless a federal law removes all existing differences between the forty-six separate state divorce laws, any statute in Illinois which makes divorces harder to obtain should be retained.

    The judge could have added that the enactment of a law which put an end to the reckless frivolity with which marriages are contracted in this country would be no less desirable. The existence of Gretna Greens to which couples 4can go to avoid the marriage laws of their home state, wedding ceremonies performed by ministers without repeated announcements from the pulpit, the issuance of licenses to minors, and many other evils in this connection, should be stamped out.

    If further proof is needed to show that American family life must be protected and encouraged, the fact may be cited that only 2,300,000 children were born in the United States last year. This figure may look large but it is hardly adequate. It means that one child was born to every ninth family. That is not a thing to be proud of. Taking the figures of previous years as a basis, we have to suppose that during the last year at least 2,300,000 persons died, which means that we did not make any gain in population by way of a natural increase. The increasing dislike of American women for bearing children and the decrease of immigration are also unfavorable factors which cannot be overlooked.

    5

    In the local Women's Forum magazine of last week, women discussed the topic: "Is marriage a failure?" without arriving at any final conclusion. To these ladies who thirst for knowledge we take the liberty of suggesting the following topic for their next debate: "Matrimonial union is a fifty-fifty partnership with duties and privileges, in happiness and sorrow, in work and recreation, which only death can render asunder;" providing, of course, that such a definition of married life does not seem too old-fashioned to ladies seized with the spirit of modernism!

    The old story that, when trains arrived in Chicago, the conductors used to shout "Five-minute stop for marriages and divorces!" has a much more serious foundation than many people would ...

    German
    I B 3 a, I B 3 b, II E 3, I K
  • Forward -- January 03, 1919
    Hotel and Cafe Waiters on Strike

    The four largest hotels here in Chicago, La Salle, Sherman, Grand Pacific and Fort Dearborn, are being picketed by the union waiters, who worked for these hotels for sometime. Mr. Parker, the head of the union had an audience with Chief of Police Garrett, and he assured Mr. Parker that the Police Department would not interefere with the picketers, if they did their picketing in a quiet, orderly manner.

    The four largest hotels here in Chicago, La Salle, Sherman, Grand Pacific and Fort Dearborn, are being picketed by the union waiters, who worked for these hotels for sometime. Mr. ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 4
  • The Sentinel -- January 03, 1919
    (No headline)

    The Ladies Auxiliary of Temple Sholom have established the Abram Hirschberg Reference Library in commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of Rabbi Hirschberg's occupancy of the pulpit. The library consists of reference books on all subjects of Jewish interest including the Bible, Biblical Science, Jewish problems, etc. It is hoped that in time, Temple Sholom will have the most comprehensive Jewish reference library in the city.

    The Ladies Auxiliary of Temple Sholom have established the Abram Hirschberg Reference Library in commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of Rabbi Hirschberg's occupancy of the pulpit. The library consists of ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 a
  • Forward -- January 03, 1919
    (No headline)

    An official call to the First Jewish National Workers Congress

    To All Organized Jewish Workers: The National Conference of the Jewish Workers Organization requests the National Workers Committee to make haste in calling all Jewish Workers in every State in the Union, to the conference of the National Jewish Workers' Alliance.

    The Jewish National Workers Congress will be convened in New York City on the 17th, 18th, and 19th of January, 1920. Some vital questions will be discussed, pertaining to the various Jewish Workers' problems in the United States and the world. The following Jewish Workers' problems are coming up for consideration:

    1. The plight of the Jews in European lands;

    2. The Palestinian question;

    3. The Jewish Congress;

    4. The Jewish Relief and Reconstruction Work in European countries;

    2

    5. The Role of the Jewish Workers in the Demobilization of the United States Army.

    6. Jewish Immigration and Work Assistance for the Jewish Immigrants;

    7. Open Door for the Jewish Immigrants;

    8. The Right of Teaching and Speaking the Jewish Language in the United States;

    9. The Union with the Socialist and Workers' Party;

    10. The Union with all Jewish Workers Organizations in other Countries;

    11. The International Jewish Workers' Congress.

    An official call to the First Jewish National Workers Congress To All Organized Jewish Workers: The National Conference of the Jewish Workers Organization requests the National Workers Committee to make ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 2, I E, III B 1, III B 2
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- January 04, 1919
    John F. Smulski, President of the Polish National Council, on His Activities in Washington, D. C

    Besides the duties entrusted to me by the Polish Conference in Detroit after the departure of Mr. I. Paderewski, an additional task was laid on me, that of representation of the Polish relief case in Washington.

    Because of the importance of many issues in this cause I left for Washington on December 8th 1918 and remained there until December 22nd. During my visit there I had conferences with the Secretary of State Mr. Phillips; the Secretary of War, Mr. Baker; the director of the Red Cross, Mr. Walling; the chief of the Food Administration Bureau, Mr. Walcott, and with the representatives of the Jews in America.

    Mr. Phillips was of the opinion that I, being an American citizen, cannot represent Poland. I then suggested that Mr. Paderewski is offically recognized as a representative, and I should be considered only as a temporary representative during his absence. Mr. Phillips agreed and heeded my point of view willingly.

    2

    In regard to the issuing of Polish passports, I suggested that, though Poland was officially still considered to be partitioned between Russia, Germany and Austria, the words "subject of Russia, Germany and Austria" should be omitted in passports issued henceforth. Mr. Phillips is of the opinion that this question will be definitely decided after the official recognition of Poland as an independent state.

    On Wednesday, December 18th, I had a conference with the Secretary of War, Mr. Baker, in regard to obtaining the aid of the War Department for the Polish army. I explained to Mr. Baker Poland's difficult situation. Poland is surrounded from the West by German troops and from the East by bands of Germans, who were Russian war prisoners, but were tried and put under the leadership of bolsheviks. I explained to what extent Poland was devastated by these enemies. I reminded Mr. Baker of the fact that Mr. Paderewski foreseeing these plunders had requested the Secretary of State and the War Department to permit releasing from the American army all those Poles who are not citizens of the United States, and to allow to recruit them for the Polish army.

    3

    The Secretary of War pointed out the great difficulty brought about by the act of the armistice. If soldiers recruited in America would be used in war against Russia or another country, then the United States would be responsible for indemnity. Mr. Baker then promised to talk this matter over with Mr. Polk, Secretary of State.

    I had another conference with Mr. Walling, director of the Red Cross, and found him very sympathetic with the Polish cause. He explained to me that all relief cases should be presented to the director of the Food Administration, Mr. Hoover, to whom he directed me. After a long conference with Mr. Walcott he conferred with Mr. Polk and Mr. Phillips, and as a result of these conferences he sent the following cablegrams to Mr. Hoover and Mr. House:

    "Mr. Hoover, American Embassy, Paris, via State Department.

    Most distressing reports reaching officers of Polish organizations regarding 4conditions in Poland since armistice, great destitution, immediate need of food, clothing and medical supplies. Smulski of Chicago and other leading Poles much distressed over absence reference Polish relief. Catastrophe too vast for private relief; should be governmental undertaking. Polish organizations representing four million American Poles eager to help with clothing, provisions and private funds. How soon can entrance into Poland be effected for supplies? Strong feeling here, situation so depressed that, unless immediately relieved, most serious consequences must follow. Think it important you cable promptly as possible to relieve minds of Poles in this country, giving them hope of constructive relief program in definite terms as possible.

    Walcott"

    On December 26th Mr. Walcott advised me of the satisfactory answer from Mr. Hoover who is sending to Poland Mr. V. Kellog and Mr. H. Gibson to investigate the situation. Likewise Mr. Walcott advised me that twenty tons of milk will be sent from Switzerland to Poland.

    Besides the duties entrusted to me by the Polish Conference in Detroit after the departure of Mr. I. Paderewski, an additional task was laid on me, that of representation of ...

    Polish
    II D 10, III H, I G, IV
  • Forward -- January 04, 1919
    Organization Assembly Calendar

    The N. E. Branch of the Socialist party takes this means of notifying all members and sympathizers to meet Tuesday January 7th, at the Wiess Hall. The noted lecturer Mr. E. Marmor will speak on socialism.

    The Jewish Nation Stage Notice: A rehearsal will be conducted this evening at 7:30, at our friend Mr. M. Sexler's house, 1623 S. Homan Ave. All Jewish actors are cordially invited. Please come on time. Social Democrat Branch #3, Zionist Workers, notifies the Jewish Literature members of an important meeting to take place today at 8 P. M. in the Lawndale school, 1224 S. Albany Ave. Comrades B. Riback and F. Gans will talk to you on two new literary works. All are invited.

    The West Side Mothers League will meet today at 7 P. M. at the Workers Institute. Some very important subjects will be discussed, and also arrangments 2for our next entertainment will be made. All members are requested to be on time.

    Zionist Workers Branch #8 is going to have a meeting of importance this evening at the National Radical School, 2642 Lemoyne St. Comrade M. Suchter will speak on the subject of the League of Nations in Palestine.

    The N. W. Jewish Socialist Branch notifies its members as follows: Please take notice that you are cordially invited to attend our home festival. Come yourself and bring your family. You will all enjoy it. Lots to eat and drink. Price of tickets is one dollar per couple, or 75¢ per person. Everybody is invited.

    The N. E. Branch of the Socialist party takes this means of notifying all members and sympathizers to meet Tuesday January 7th, at the Wiess Hall. The noted lecturer Mr. ...

    Jewish
    I E, II A 3 d 1, III B 1