The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Naujienos -- January 02, 1915
    The Dramatic Aspect of Life

    p. 8..... A workingman spends most of his life in providing for the material needs of life. He finds very little time to acquaint himself with the imperfections of life thru newspapers and books where he might gleam many valuable lessons of life.

    To most of our people a dramatical play is the most accessible and pleasant means of gaining an education. Lessons on desirable living may be learned from the drama, which depicts the story of human life and character in all its aspects. In a drama a small group of individuals depict in a concentrated form the evils and imperfections in the characters of thousands of different people.

    Tomorrow evening, Jan. 3rd, the 18th Street Lithuanian Dramatic Circle will present a three act drama, "A Ruined Life," by P. Maciulis, at 1126 W.18th St. This is a very impressive and educational play, dealing with temperance. It contains a moral for thousands of people. All Lithuanians are invited.

    p. 8..... A workingman spends most of his life in providing for the material needs of life. He finds very little time to acquaint himself with the imperfections of life ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 c 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1915
    Handicraft Exhibition at the Ceska Utulna a Sirotcinec

    It was Sunday, October 25, at 2 P. M. when the main entrance of the Ceska Utulna A Sirotcinec (Bohemian Old People's Home and Orphanage) was opened to a large crowd of visitors who were eager to inspect the results of ten months' work of the young inmates of the institution.

    The crowd was unexpectedly large--larger, in fact, than the premises of the exhibition could accomodate--and there were many non-Bohemians.....

    That the exhibition was a complete success may be gathered from the fact that $475.63 was taken in for the exhibits sold to admirers during the day, in addition to which $261.15 was received subsequently, making a total of $653.28. The raw material necessary for the exhibits cost $124.99, hence the net profit for the exhibition amounted to $528.29.

    2

    Otto F. Dusek, secretary of the Ceska

    Utulna A Sirotcinec.

    It was Sunday, October 25, at 2 P. M. when the main entrance of the Ceska Utulna A Sirotcinec (Bohemian Old People's Home and Orphanage) was opened to a large ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 a, II D 5, II D 4
  • Skandinaven -- January 02, 1915
    Norwegian Literary Club

    A few months ago Mr. and Mrs. Anton Nelson invited a group of friends to their home, 2514 Spaulding Avenue. All of the guests were interested in books. Miss Lucille Le Furgey, gave a talk on Ibsen's, The Lady of the Sea. The people present were so taken by this clear and interesting talk that they at once decided to organize a literary club, and meet once a month. It was also decided to read and discuss all the works of Ibsen, Bjornson, and other Scandinavian authors. The Club will also cover other European literature. The Club has fifty members and more men and women join at each meeting.

    A few months ago Mr. and Mrs. Anton Nelson invited a group of friends to their home, 2514 Spaulding Avenue. All of the guests were interested in books. Miss Lucille ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1915
    The New Bohemian Presbyterian Church (Half-tone, three column-quarter of a page view of the church)

    A large number of beautiful buildings, both private and public, have been built in the Lawndale district, one of those sections in Chicago where the population is predominantly Bohemian. These buildings add a great deal to the fine appearance of the district, and the latest among them is the new Bohemian Presbyterian Church on South Lawndale Avenue near West 26th Street.

    This church seems to have grown up overnight without anybody's noticing it. The credit for the building goes to our noted national worker, Reverend Vaclav Vanek, whose undertakings always seem to be brought to a successful conclusion. Whatever he starts, he knows how to finish, even if it requires a great deal of concentrated effort on his part. He works quietly, without any ado, and his enterprises are always of a humanitarian nature. One of his most important achievements is the Bohemian Immigrants' Home in Baltimore, a project on which he worked long enough to secure for it the permanent support of the Austrian 2government. When this was done and he saw that his work was assured a permanent existence, he retired quietly from Baltimore and came to work in Chicago.

    Here he has laid the foundation for the Bohemian Settlement on South Racine Avenue; here he has been working hard in the Ceska Dobrocinna Spolecnost (Bohemian Charitable Association), of which he is the secretary; and more recently, he has been devoting most of his energy to the realization of his old dream, the building of a Bohemian Presbyterian church in the Lawndale district. In spite of the fact that most of the money for the church had to be secured from non-Bohemian-Americans, Reverend Vanek completed this great piece of work in so short a time that none of his friends would have thought it sufficient even to start a comprehensive campaign. Now that the church is finished, it serves as an ornament for the whole neighborhood.

    The dedication ceremonies will take place tomorrow, January 3. The name of 3this new house of worship is the "Hubbard Memorial Cesky Presbyterni Chram" (Hubbard Memorial Bohemian Presbyterian Church). It is located in the very center of the Bohemian colony on South Lawndale Avenue, that is, at 2522-28 South Lawndale Avenue, and the minister is its founder, Reverend V. Vanek.

    The dedication ceremonies will start Sunday at 10 A. M. with services conducted by Reverend Vincent Pisek of the Husuv Ceskobratrsky Chram (John Huss Church of Bohemian Brothers) in New York. This is the same Dr. Pisek to whom credit is due for the financing of the recent Bohemian medical expedition to Serbia. He secured the sum of $12,000 from one of his friends to whom he had told the story of a servant girl who brought him two dollars for the Serbians after having walked several miles in order to save the nickel for carfare.

    At 3:30 P. M. the dedication proper will take peace. It will be presided over by the Moderator of the Chicago Presbytery, Dr. Clarke, and the principal 4speaker will be the noted philanthropist and friend of the Bohemian people, Dr. John Timothy Stone, minister of the Fourth Presbyterian Church. Reverend Edgar P. Hill and many other prominent personages of Chicago Presbyterian churches will also be present.

    At 8 o'clock in the evening, a sermon will be preached by the Moderator of the Bohemian Middle-West (sic) Presbyterian Church, Reverend Jos. Krenek of Silver Lake, Minnesota, and another sermon by Dr. A. Barta of Dubuque, Iowa. The evening of Monday, January 4, is reserved for the Bohemian Protestant preachers of Chicago; and Tuesday night there will be a lecture by Dr. Krenek on the timely topic, "By What Can the Slavs Enrich Humanity?" Wednesday night there will be a speech by Dr. F. J. Smetanka on "Bohemia;" Thursday the opening of the classes and a social evening for the pupils will take place; and on Friday will be held the first prayer meeting in the new church.

    The edifice is one of the most beautiful and most modern of Bohemian Protestant 5churches in this country. Including the real estate and inside furnishings, it was built at a cost of $36,000. Reverend Vanek tells us that with the exception of $3,000, the entire amount is subscribed for, and that he expects to have little difficulty in securing the missing $3,000 among his personal friends.

    A sum of $10,000 was donated by the estate of the Hubbard family, after whom the church is named. The auditorium seats four hundred people; the schoolrooms accommodate three hundred and fifty. The structure was built by the contracting firm J. A. Holpuch and Company of Chicago.

    A large number of beautiful buildings, both private and public, have been built in the Lawndale district, one of those sections in Chicago where the population is predominantly Bohemian. These ...

    Bohemian
    III C, II D 10, II D 6, III H, II F, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1915
    A New Bohemian School

    Bohemian Chicago will be one important national building richer--a building devoted exclusively to school purposes. The Patronat Cesko-Anglicke Svobodomyslne Skoly (Trustees of the Bohemian-English Free Thought School), after years of deliberation, have decided to realize an old idea of building a schoolhouse of their own where the pupils now enrolled in the Patronat's school could find everything that can be expected in a modern school building. The Patronat has been maintaining a school in its hall on 18th Street for many years, but for a long time its members have been aware of the fact that the present accommodations are not adequate.....

    It was therefore decided to build a new school....on the two empty lots right across the street from the present premises.....

    The Patronat is most fortunate in having been able to secure this site for the comparatively low price of $4,000.....

    Bohemian Chicago will be one important national building richer--a building devoted exclusively to school purposes. The Patronat Cesko-Anglicke Svobodomyslne Skoly (Trustees of the Bohemian-English Free Thought School), after years of ...

    Bohemian
    III C, II B 2 f, II F
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1915
    War Relief Report

    We present a report of the money contributed for war relief through the Denni Hlasatel.....

    Total for Bohemian relief, $1,484.75
    Total for the Serbian Red Cross, $63.70
    Total for the Russian Red Cross, $497.25
    Grand total to date, $2,045.70

    We present a report of the money contributed for war relief through the Denni Hlasatel..... <table> <tr> <td>Total for Bohemian relief,</td> <td>$1,484.75</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total for the Serbian Red Cross,</td> ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, I G, III H
  • Naujienos -- January 04, 1915
    Ruined Life Staged by Dramatic Circle

    p. 3.... Last Sunday evening, Jan.3rd, the 18th Street Lithuanian Dramatic Circle successfully presented "A Ruined Life," a three act drama dealing with temperance to a large audience at the C.S.P. hall.

    The play revolved around the main character, farmer Zluobis, showing how he acquired the drinking habit and how that ultimately ruined his life.

    The role of farmer Zluobis was played by P. Buragas, who did his part unually well. The other important roles were played by John Motuzas, Miss Kalvaites, and Miss Karpavicius.

    We would like to suggest that our playwrights and artists devote more time to more realistic portrayal of love scenes. There is wide variety of views and attitudes towards that subject among the audience. In order to produce an agreeable effect the subject must be handled with great care.

    p. 3.... Last Sunday evening, Jan.3rd, the 18th Street Lithuanian Dramatic Circle successfully presented "A Ruined Life," a three act drama dealing with temperance to a large audience at the ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 c 1, I B 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1915
    Sokol Tabor Slovanske Lipy

    The first meeting of the new Sokol Tabor Slovanske Lipy (Sokol unit called Tabor Slovanske Lipy), a unit formed by the merger of the Sokol Slovanska Lipa and the Sokol Tabor, was held yesterday afternoon.....

    The principal, really only, business of the meeting was the election of officers.....

    The Sokol Tabor Slovanske Lipy celebrated this first official event in a most appropriate manner. It undertook a collection which yielded $45.05, an amount which will be equally divided between the Bohemian legionnaires and the Serbian Red Cross. For war relief in the old country, a per capita tax will be levied on the entire membership.....

    The first meeting of the new Sokol Tabor Slovanske Lipy (Sokol unit called Tabor Slovanske Lipy), a unit formed by the merger of the Sokol Slovanska Lipa and the Sokol ...

    Bohemian
    II B 3, II D 10, III H, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 04, 1915
    Announcement

    Every association in the United States is urgently requested to quote and adopt the following resolutions:

    The - - - - - - - - - -

    of - - - - - - - - - - -

    with a membership of - - - - citizens of Chicago, on the - - day of - - 1914, adopted the following resolutions:

    Whereas, ten nations of the old world are now waging the greatest war of mankind and are not only exhausting their own resources but are also drawing immense supplies and munitions of war from the United States of America, and

    Whereas, the armament amd supplies that are being furnished by the United States tend to increase the military conflagration of Europe, multiply the loss of life, already appalling, and cause the destruction of property that is bringing nations to desolation, and assist in the prolongation and continuance of this most dreadful of all wars, and

    Whereas, we, as a people, from our hearts lift our voices in prayer for peace 2while, as a Nation, we are aiding in war, and augmenting the struggle by emptying our private arsenals and war supplies onto the battlefields of Europe, and

    Whereas, our Government has proclaimed strict neutrality and thereby given assurance to American citizens of all races and to the belligerent powers themselves, that we shall give aid and support to none, and by our acts, as a Nation break no bonds of friendship with the countries with whom we are at peace, and create no discord among our citizens hereby discriminating against their fatherland, yet when we offer military supplies and equipments to any nations that choose to buy, it is with the full knowledge that for one hundred years England by her supremacy on the sea, is the master of all contraband goods transported by water, and that she and her friends alone can benefit by our unholy commerce, and we are pursuing that course which diverts so far from strict neutrality that we injure our ancient friends, excepting the employment of armed force alone, and

    Whereas, this country has recognized the right of our government to with hold war supplies from contending armies when she laid an embargo upon munitions of war when the feeble armies of Mexico were arrayed against each other, nevertheless, she now offers her limitless supplies to the mightiest armies that were 3ever assembled in battle array; and

    Whereas, the United States is disloyal to itself when it promotes a foreign war by furnishing the sinews of war, while the nation is prostrate commercially and waiting for the dawn of peace to return to her former prosperity and achievement.

    Therefore be it resolved, that we, the above named society, hereby declare that it is the imperative duty of the Congress of the United States to pass the necessary law forthwith that will enable the President of the United States to lay an embargo upon all contraband of war, saving and excepting foodstuffs alone, and thereby withdraw from the contending powers all aid and assistance of this Republic.

    Be it further resolved, that we are in strict sympathy with the Christian endeavor of this nation to appeal to the God of nations that peace may come and reject as hypocrisy and national sacrilege the commercial spirit of the country that is answering our supplications for peace by sending the instruments of destruction and death to the serried armies arrayed in struggle through the empires of Europe.

    And be it further resolved, that we, as joint races, who have sought the shelter 4of the American flag and have contributed our full share to American peace, American Christianity and American civilization, that we call upon all Americans to join with us in enforcing thatstrict American neutrality that will give aid and comfort to none of the contending powers and that will withhold American resources from promoting destruction and slaughter among the friendly nations of Europe.

    We, the President and Secretary of the above named society attest the above by our signatures.

    Every society is requested after adopting the resolutions to copy some three times and have them certified by the President and Secretary, where upon the Illinois Staats Zeitung will mail one of each to the representative of the district in which the society is located.

    By request copies of these resolutions will be delivered free of charge.

    Every association in the United States is urgently requested to quote and adopt the following resolutions: The - - - - - - - - - - of - - ...

    German
    I G, III H
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- January 04, 1915
    Anti-Immigration Bill Passes in Senate

    The thing which we have foreseen has now actually happened. The Dillingham-Burnett anti-immigration bill has been passed in the United States Senate. This bill, if enforced, would prohibit entrance to illiterate immigrants, that is to those unable to read and write. The vote on this measure was held on January 2, 1915, with the result that fifty Senators voted for the proposed law and only seven against it. This bill also excludes negroes from Africa; on the other hand, it permits Belgian illiterates to settle here, under this condition that they shall settle on farms and work on them.

    President Wilson made it known decisively that he will veto the bill if the illiteracy clause is not removed from it. The President, however, will gain nothing in the Senate, because the bill would pass there over his vote. It is doubtful whether the House of Representatives will be able to obtain a two-thirds vote against the Executive's vote. True, the anti-immigration bill 2did pass previously by a majority of votes in the House of Representatives, but there might be insufficient strength to override the President's veto.

    The thing which we have foreseen has now actually happened. The Dillingham-Burnett anti-immigration bill has been passed in the United States Senate. This bill, if enforced, would prohibit entrance to ...

    Polish
    III G