The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 03, 1909
    Real-Estate Transactions

    The following Norsemen bought or sold real estate:

    Ingri M. Peterson to Frederick Schroeder: Diversey Court, north of Wrightwood Avenue, Lake View. Price, $11,000.

    Charles B. Westberg to Perlie M. Campbell: Ridge Avenue, south of Wayne Avenue, Lake View. Price $6,500.

    B. Tibbets to Annie Finstad: Fullerton Avenue, east of Central Park Avenue, Jefferson. Price, $850.

    Washington Park Club to Samuel D. Benson: St. Lawrence Avenue, south of Sixty-first Street, Hyde Park. Price, $1,275.

    F. M. Hevle to M. M. Grossman: Kedzie Avenue, north of Thirteenth Street, West Town. Price, $1,100.

    2

    Phillipp Niebel to Christian Anderson: California Avenue, north of Augusta Street, Price, $1,250.

    Christian Anderson to Phillipp Niebel: Monticello Avenue, south of Thomas Street. Price, $5,350.

    The following Norsemen bought or sold real estate: Ingri M. Peterson to Frederick Schroeder: Diversey Court, north of Wrightwood Avenue, Lake View. Price, $11,000. Charles B. Westberg to Perlie M. ...

    Norwegian
    II F
  • Skandinaven -- January 04, 1909
    Bjorgvin Presents Play

    The Bjorgvin Dramatic Club presented a play last Saturday in Bjorgvin Hall. The play was the humoristic piece by C. P. Riis, "Til" (Mountain Life). The play has been presented several times before, yet so many people sought admission to the presentation that many had to be turned away.

    The Bjorgvin Dramatic Club has undergone certain changes in that new actors have joined the Club. Whether these changes will improve the Club cannot be said with any assurance yet. It was noticeable at the performance on Saturday that the actors were nervous and uncertain, though there were some notable exceptions....

    Mr. Christ Olsen is the director and has succeeded in gathering together quite a group of actors. The Bjorgvin Dramatic Club is able to do better work in 2the humoristic line than the Danish troupers who have offered their wares of late. It is to be hoped that the Club will get up enough energy to present something new soon.

    The Bjorgvin Dramatic Club presented a play last Saturday in Bjorgvin Hall. The play was the humoristic piece by C. P. Riis, "Til" (Mountain Life). The play has been presented ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 c 1
  • Skandinaven -- January 04, 1909
    [Norwegian National Association] A Year of Accomplishments

    The Norwegian National Association began its annual meeting in Sleipner Hall last night. Various reports were presented and accepted; some current business was disposed of, and officers were elected for the coming year.

    With every passing year the Norwegian National Association becomes more worthy of its name. Interest in the affairs of the Association is not restricted to the delegates, but has taken hold of the 3,500 members represented by the Association. Especially is this interest strong before each annual meeting. And this of course, is natural. One might say that during the years two parties have and been formed within the Association. It is difficult to determine the 2dividing issues, but nevertheless the parties are there.... The chief interest naturally centered about the election of president.... The opposition party had but slight chance, and its chances were all the more restricted because the votes were split between various candidates. The result was that Attorney John J. Sonsteby, a member of Chicago Board of Education, was elected by a large majority. The result of the election aside from the presidential office was as follows: first vice-president, Mr. O. C. Wold; second vice-president, Mrs. Marie Nielsen; third vice-president, Dr. S. Hannestad; recording secretary, Mr. H. Jentoft; corresponding secretary, Mr. J. Malmstrom; treasurer, Mr. Carl J. Backer. After the election of officers the meeting was continued till the coming Monday. The retiring president, Mr. Birger Osland, thanked the delegates for pleasant co-operation during the past year. He also read the report of the board of directors which this time was placed before the delegates in printed form. The report shows what the Association has done under the able and energetic leadership of Mr. Osland. The following is a summary of the report:

    3

    During the past year nine meetings were held--six regular meetings and three special. The board of directors held eighteen meetings; the Seventeenth of May committee, fifteen.

    At the beginning of the year the Norwegian explorer, Roald Amundsen, visited Chicago on his lecture tour through America, and one of the vice-presidents of the Association, Mr. Lasse Grundeland, gave a brief speech of introduction at Mr. Amundsen's....lecture in Wicker Park Hall.

    On February 17 the Association's annual banquet for delegates and invited guests was held. The banquet, which was most successful, was arranged by a committee consisting of Messrs. S. Huseby; L. Halse; A. Amundsen. The speakers on this occasion were Consul F. M. Gade, Dr. Anders Doe, Judge Oscar M. Torrison, Mr. A. Abrahamsen, Mr. M. Clausen, and Editor A. B. Lange. The 4ladies' quartet, Echo, sang and a ladies' orchestra played during the festival.

    On inquiry from the Nordmands Forbundet (Norsemen's Association) in Christiania, Norway, as to whether the Norwegian National Association would join the Norsemen's Association, the secretary was instructed at the meeting on March 2 that the Norwegian National Association is restricted by its constitution from making decision in a matter of this kind since the individual societies within the Association have retained the right to decide for themselves.

    In April, the Norwegian Singing Association, together with the Norwegian National Association, gave a concert at Orchestra Hall for the benefit of the building fund of the Norwegian Orphanage, after a fire had destroyed the Orphanage buildings on Irving Park Boulevard. The committee on arrangements consisted of an equal number of members from the two Associations, the presidents of which.... functioned as active chairmen of the committee, with Mr. John Anderson, publisher 5of the Skandinaven, acting as honorary chairman. The accounts show that the concert gave a net income of $954.15, with some small amounts yet to be added.

    At the festival in Humboldt Park after the children's Seventeenth of May procession, Reverend G. A. Gullixon spoke in Norwegian and Miss Jane Addams, founder of Hull House, spoke in English....

    The speakers of the day at Brand's Park were Mr. William Jennings Bryan and Judge O. K. Torrison... After the speeches in the Park, the ladies served refreshments. The festival was attended by more than twelve thousand people and was a success in every respect.

    6

    On July 22, the Norwegian National Association sent a protest to the Board of Education against the announced result of the census just taken by the Board in Chicago. This census gave the number of Norwegians in the city as 42,816, while the census taken by the Government in 1900 showed 59,898 Norwegians in Chicago. The Association pointed out that the number at this time, in all probability, is greater than in 1900. The justification of the protest was acknowledged by the Board and copies thereof were ordered sent to all the members of the Board.

    At the meeting in September, a committee was appointed to make arrangements for a lecture in English for children, to be given on the day of the Seventeenth of May celebration at Wicker Park Hall, as a wind-up to the children's procession in the forenoon. The Association believes that such a lecture will aid considerably in awakening and maintaining the children's interest in the land of their fathers, and that such a lecture is most desirable since the instructions in history in the public schools neither is nor can become as comprehensive as the 7Norwegian-Americans wish....

    At the same meeting a proposal to hold a festival in the fall was voted down. The reason was that the Association did not wish to deviate from its practice of arranging festivities only for the Seventeenth of May festival unless special occasions were to demand united action by the societies, or unless the condition of the treasury were to make such united action necessary. For similar reasons, and also in order to prevent unnecessary competition with the individual societies, the board of directors has found it unwise to support motions advocating the acquisition of real estate and the erection of a hall to be used by the Association.

    In November the board of directors made an unexpected visit to the Norwegian Orphanage on Irving Park Boulevard. At the following meeting of delegates, the board reported on the excellent state of order, cleanliness, and care prevailing at the Orphanage, and it was resolved that the delegates should visit 8the bazaar of the Orphanage as a group on some definite evening.

    The North-West Improvement Association became involved in political party strife, and it was therefore resolved to withdraw the National Association's representatives from the Improvement Association because the laws of the Norwegian National Association forbid participation under such circumstances.

    By request the National Association has sent representatives to the Women's Trade Union League of Illinois, Immigration Department, and the League for the Protection of Immigrants. The superintendent of the employment office was sent to the former organization, and Mr. John J. Sonsteby was sent to the latter as a temporary representative (until the act can be endorsed by the Association). Mr. Sonsteby was elected to the board of directors of the League for the Protection of Immigrants.

    At the beginning of the year the board of directors adopted a seal and an 9emblem for the Association. This action was later ratified by the vote of the delegates of the Association.

    On Sunday, December 27, a committee consisting of Mrs. Marie Malmstrom, Mrs. Nicoline Oyen, and Mrs. G. Wallentin distributed Christmas presents to the children of the Norwegian Orphanage. The Association had voted fifty dollars for this purpose.

    As will be shown by the books, the Association has, during the year, rendered support to various benevolent organizations in Chicago. It has also pledged the amount of one hundred dollars toward the erection of a monument in Norway for the late Premier Johan Sverdrup.

    The report from the employment office shows that the work of the office has prospered during the past year. Because of changes in the form of monthly reports, the statistics of the attached report refer only to the period from 10April 1 to November 30, at which date the year of operation for the employment office ends.

    The Norwegian National Association began its annual meeting in Sleipner Hall last night. Various reports were presented and accepted; some current business was disposed of, and officers were elected for ...

    Norwegian
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, III B 3 a, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, II D 10, II D 4, II D 3, III A, III G, III H, II C, IV

    Card Images

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  • Skandinaven -- January 04, 1909
    The Norwegian Turner Society Celebrates What Japan Can Teach Us

    The Norwegian Turner Society held a pleasant social on Sunday evening in the Society's gymnasium at the Park Casino. The large hall had been given a festive air by the decorations executed by Sverre Dietrich and Chester Thorson. Norwegian and American flags and colors met the eye wherever one turned and on the long northern wall appeared the letters D. N. T. in red, blue, and white.

    At 10:30 P. M. the march to table began, Mr. and Mrs. S. Huseby heading the procession. Mr. G. Martin functioned as toastmaster and....performed his task well. The food was excellent; Mr. Lippmann, the host of the Park Casino did himself proud in the meal he served.

    The first speaker of the evening was the president of the Norwegian National Association, Mr. Birger Osland, who in appropriate words spoke in honor of 2Norway. The speech was vigorously applauded.

    Attorney Olaf Ray called attention to the importance of the turner movement in a speech entitled "We Norwegians". He claimed that the turner movement is not being shown sufficient interest in our country, and that Norwegians of means do not contribute as much as they ought to the Norwegian Turner Society in Chicago. We are ready, he said, to aid the children by building orphanages; we help the old people by building homes for the aged. All of this is very good, Mr. Ray said, but it merely means that we co-operate in so far as the outer points of life are concerned; on the other hand, we pay but scant attention to the organizations which teach us to live.

    To emphasize his assertion, the speaker referred to conditions in Japan.... The Dutch ambassador to Tokio was to be transferred to the United States and before moving he went to make his farewell visit to the famous General Nogi. He found the General's wife at home, and she told the Ambassador that her husband was at work....He was teaching gymnastics in the public school. The Ambassador later found the General busily instructing a class of boys under 3fourteen years of age in gymnastics.

    If athletics were lent as great interest in America, Mr. Ray said, the results would soon be apparent. America would have strong, healthy young people.

    Mr. Ray's interesting speech was listened to with rapt attention and was rewarded with strong applause.

    Attorney John J. Sonsteby gave an appealing speech in honor of America; Mr. C. Holt spoke in honor of the Turner Society; Attorney G. A. Ellingsen spoke with great enthusiasm in honor of the ladies with special reference to the ladies' turner class....

    The social concluded with dancing. Mr. Lawson's orchestra furnished the music.

    The Norwegian Turner Society held a pleasant social on Sunday evening in the Society's gymnasium at the Park Casino. The large hall had been given a festive air by the ...

    Norwegian
    II B 3, IV
  • Abendpost -- January 05, 1909
    Germanistic Society Jena & Sedan

    In the Fullerton Hall of the Art Institute the Germanistic Society of Chicago opened last night its second series of lectures. Dr. Alexander Franz of the Commercial School of Frankfort A. M. gave a lecture about Jena and Sedan. Speaker declared that those days which expressed the deepest disgrace and the highest glory for Prussia on the one side and for the Napoleonists on the side, had been caused by conditions, which in 1806 were in Prussia nearly the same as 1870 in France. The Prussian Army in 1806 rested on their laurels from the time of the great King. The knowledge of the art of war was missing. No reserve system for officers and men was kept, the officers were old and unfit for service. The recruiting system was still in force and 2/3 of the army were Poles, who did not understand German. Napoleon had the best men acquired by conscription. They were well paid. The chance to be advanced to a field marshal and the enthusiasm for the Emperor made every soldier do his best.

    In the year 1870 the picture reversed to the favor of Germany. Napoleon 2had no equal army to the German conscription. The French Chassepot rifle however, was superior but the equipment of the Prussian troups was superior. The French were too sure of their victory and Napoleon confined himself to the defense. The French army of Mar Mahon at Sedan was encircled by the 3rd and 4th army, lead by the crown princes of Saxony and Prussia.

    In the Fullerton Hall of the Art Institute the Germanistic Society of Chicago opened last night its second series of lectures. Dr. Alexander Franz of the Commercial School of Frankfort ...

    German
    II B 2 g, III B 2, III H
  • Skandinaven -- January 05, 1909
    Real-Estate Transactions

    The following Norsemen bought or sold real estate last week:

    Louis M. Nelson to Frank G. Boomer: Morse Avenue, west of Perry Street, Rogers Park. Price, $2,400.

    L.C. Vanuxen to James C. Hansen: Southport Avenue, south of Balmoral Avenue, Lake View. Price, $1,360.

    C.A. Sawyer to Andrew B. Anderson: 118th Street, Hyde Park. Price, $500.

    B.M. Marshall to J.L. Howland: Midway Park, west of Franklin Avenue, West Town. Price, $7,500.

    G.M. Douglas to Carl Pedersen: Warsaw Avenue, West of Elston Avenue, West Town. Price, $2,576.

    2

    S.M. Gunderson to Christian Kloepfer: Lot 38, Block 3, Gudsenson & G. Addition, Oak Park. Price, $4,100.

    The following Norsemen bought or sold real estate last week: Louis M. Nelson to Frank G. Boomer: Morse Avenue, west of Perry Street, Rogers Park. Price, $2,400. L.C. Vanuxen to ...

    Norwegian
    II F
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- January 05, 1909
    Annual Statement (Editorial)

    It is an old custom in the newspaper world at the beginning of a new year to entertain readers with a survey of the publication's past accomplishments and program for the future, and we do not deny that on such occasions there is a temptation to exaggerate the former and become overambitious in regard to the latter.

    As far as Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter is concerned, a review of the past year is encouraging and should assure continued improvement, progress, and victories, without undue bragging and lofty promises. During the past year we have further secured our prominent position among the country's many Swedish-American newspapers, due to the fact that we are fully aware of and do our best to live up to our great responsibilities as an impartial organ for our Swedish-American public. In spite of the poor times, our mailing list has increased, and we have won many new subscribers not only in American but also in the old fatherland, as 2well as in other foreign countries. New features and improvement of the old ones have been introduced; more timely illustrations and pictures than ever before have been printed, and in almost every department new ideas have been tried out. In this connection we particularly want to point to the series of colored illustrations accompanying the column under the title "From the World of Phantasy to Reality," which was initiated a few weeks ago.

    Editorially as well as in our general reading material, we follow a truly liberal policy with due respect for the opinions of others and a desire to be humane and do justice to everybody, without permitting our outlook to be misdirected by reactionary or egotistical considerations. In this respect our past record may be taken as a true indication of future action.

    There is not much to be added concerning our program for the year which has just begun. We shall, of course, always continue to improve our plant and product whenever and wherever possible, within such limits as our financial situation permits.

    3

    Also this year the interests of our readers shall come first, editorially as well as in the choice of general articles and news items, and all sound and sincere efforts toward human betterment may count on our support.

    We shall in the future, as we have done in the past, champion the cause of the real producers, the farmers, and industrial as well as other workers, and support them in their struggle against exploitation by the powerful corporations. The most important items on our program are: Freedom, Justice, and Tolerance. Reaction, in whatever form it may appear, we shall always oppose.

    The past year has been a rather difficult one for all newspapers, and not least for the Swedish-American publications. Expenditures have increased in spite of generally falling commodity prices, and for this reason many American dailies and periodicals have been forced to raise their subscription rates, but we shall continue to give full value for one dollar per year. This low price was set in accordance with the low production costs which prevailed a few years ago. But at the present time the price of paper, wages in the printing trade, and almost 4everything else connected with the publishing of a newspaper are higher, and it is due to the increase in sales that we are able to maintain this low price. But we are barely making ends meet, and we hope our subscribers will cooperate with us by paying their bills promptly.

    We have this year presented every subscriber with a calendar and an alamanac, more attractive and with more interesting contents than ever before.

    We want all our friends to know that we sincerely appreciate the encouraging support which they have given us in the past, and hope that they also will stand by us in the future.

    Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter pledges itself to do everything within its power to justify their confidence.

    It is an old custom in the newspaper world at the beginning of a new year to entertain readers with a survey of the publication's past accomplishments and program for ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 d 1, I D 1 a
  • Loxias -- January 06, 1909
    Various News

    With great joy all friends will hear that the progressive Greek brothers, Theodore and Basilis Chamales, owners of the Savoy, have bought another restaurant for $15,000.00 at 286 S. State Street near the Greek-American restaurant of Mr. Koutsoumbos.

    Loxias wishes them long life and huge profits.

    Our well-known friends, A. Stathas and J. Kosmopoulos, have opened billiard rooms at 78 North Clark Street. They have one of the biggest establishments on the North Side.

    With great joy all friends will hear that the progressive Greek brothers, Theodore and Basilis Chamales, owners of the Savoy, have bought another restaurant for $15,000.00 at 286 S. State ...

    Greek
    II A 2
  • Loxias -- January 06, 1909
    Curious Things

    The Greek Star has just done a wonderful and philanthropic deed. In order to help the poor Italians suffering from the earthquake, the Star promised free subscriptions to those bringing in donations to help the sufferers.

    Kind-hearted Greeks went from store to store, collecting what they could. After the money was handed to the Star, the publisher presented it to a prominent American organization interested in the Italian situation.

    "Here is $200," he said, "a donation from the Greek Star."

    2

    This is a false statement we would like to correct. This money is a donation from the Greek people of Chicago, not from the Greek Star. The Greek Star was very wrong in doing what it did. Instead of giving the money to an American organization, it should have sent it directly to the Italian Consulate from the Greek people of Chicago. Why? Because we Greeks have much in common with Italians and owe them many courtesies. When the money comes from us, Italy will thank us for it and a mutual feeling of friendliness will prevail.

    The Greek Star lost considerably in not seeing this because it probably would have gotten a letter of thanks from the Italian Government, if it had not been so hasty. Now the American organization will take all the credit.

    The Greek Star has just done a wonderful and philanthropic deed. In order to help the poor Italians suffering from the earthquake, the Star promised free subscriptions to those bringing ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, II D 10
  • Loxias -- January 06, 1909
    Mckinley, Roosevelt, and Taft

    The Republicans of the United States claim for themselves credit for the virtuous and honest administrations, while their opponents do not offer such confidence as to industry, work, and prosperity of the citizens in general during their administrations.

    Our paper, mindful of the principles of McKinley and particularly those of Republicanism, has with all its ability, from August 12 to November 2, never ceased, in every weekly issue to support the Republican Party efficiently and disinterestedly. Other Greek papers of our city, supposed to be Republican, expected (after such obligations and public appointments of its publishers) to receive money in advance, not to fight for principles, but to write about the party. That is a shame. As characters, those writers, and we say this in a public way, cannot be called true Republicans, but are bought bluffers, who, giving no support 2to the progressive party of the country, are looking out just for the interest of their own pockets.

    Loxias stands with pride today, because it voiced principles, for the sake of principles and not for the sake of money.

    The Republicans of the United States claim for themselves credit for the virtuous and honest administrations, while their opponents do not offer such confidence as to industry, work, and prosperity ...

    Greek
    I F 3, II B 2 d 1