The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Scandia -- January 11, 1902
    The Tabitha Hospital

    The Norwegian Lutheran Tabitha Society was organized in 1885 by eight women. It was resolved for the time being to meet every Tuesday. The Society was to sew clothing for the needy and charge dues of five cents per month. One third of the dues were set aside for the building of a home to care for poor and needy people who were sick. Mrs. Caroline Clement was elected president, Miss Maria Noroos, secretary, and Mrs. Louise Johnson, treasurer. The other organizers were Mrs. Maria Ursin, Mrs. Anna Johnson, Mrs. Kaia Thime, and Miss Christina Brown.

    The Society grew, and in 1888 the program was changed to include the building of a hospital and a Deaconess home, but in 1889 a majority decided to work only for the building of a hospital. It was also decided that the board would consist of eighteen men. Women were, therefore, taboo on the board. This caused a split, and many of the older members quit the Society and 2organized the "Original Tabitha Society". In February, 1891, the "Original" called the Sisters Amalia, Martha, and Maria from the Deaconess Home in Minneapolis, and then bought a frame building at 190 [old number] Humboldt Street. On December 1, 1891 the Deaconess Home and Hospital was opened in this building. Sister Amalia was head Deaconess. In August, 1892, Sister Maria died, but the other two carried on. In August, 1893, the Home and Hospital burned to the ground. Before the fire that destroyed all the property of the Society, negotiations had been started to amalgamate the two Tabitha Societies, and on June 7, 1892, this was done at Our Savior's church.

    On June 3, 1892, the cornerstone of the new hospital was laid. On October 24, the new hospital was dedicated. The Society elected the following board in April, 1894: Oscar M. Torrison, A. P. Johnson, Captain John Anderson, P. O. Skarden, John Kalheim, and Dr. [Niles T.] Quales. Later there was another split, one group wanting trained nurses in the Hospital, another group insisting that practical nurses were good enough. On December 326, Miss Martha Ellingsen was appointed superintendent of nurses and Sisters Amalia and Martha refused to work under her.

    At the convention in 1895, the question of "Deaconess" or "Norwegian Hospital" was to be decided. This caused a lengthy discussion and nearly brought about another split.

    The Norwegian Lutheran Tabitha Society was organized in 1885 by eight women. It was resolved for the time being to meet every Tuesday. The Society was to sew clothing for ...

    Norwegian
    II D 3, III C, IV
  • DennĂ­ Hlasatel -- January 11, 1902
    [The Proposed Immigration Law.]

    We Bohemians are the best voters, at least in the eyes of the elected politicians. When we elect someone to an office, we do not trouble ourselves as to whether he supports our interests as workingmen, retailers, or immigrants, and it does not strike us at all that we should give our elected representative any instruction as to how we wish him to act in this or that matter. There is pending in Congress legislation pertaining to immigration, which is of the utmost importance to our national existence. It is generally expected that a very detrimental immigration law will be passed. All foreign born nationals are agitating against it, making every effort to stop this threat to their national existence. Only we Bohemians with true Turkish resignation in the matter stand idly by and wait to see what our Congressmen will think up for us.

    We Bohemians are the best voters, at least in the eyes of the elected politicians. When we elect someone to an office, we do not trouble ourselves as to whether ...

    Bohemian
    III G, I C, III A, III B 1
  • Scandia -- January 11, 1902
    The Tabitha Hospital Society

    Fifty members of the Tabitha Hospital Society called a special meeting to elect a nominations committee in accordance with the bylaws of the Society. The meeting was held last Sunday at Scandia Hall; three hundred people were present. The pastors of the Synod churches had warned their congregations against attending this meeting, but many church people showed up just the same. Attorney Stoltenberg was elected chairman for the evening, and H. Rommen was elected recorder.

    Dr. Carl Sandberg showed, with colored diagrams, how the last convention was illegal because the constitution called for a representation of all the branches of the Society, and this had not been the case. The Erie Branch, the smallest, had the greatest representation, and the Norge Branch, the largest, had no representation, and this year's nominationscommittee had tried the same stunt. The president of the Society, Dr. Oscar Torrison, rose to declare the present meeting illegal because neither president nor secretary could call a special 2meeting; this could only be done by the entire executive board. Attorney John Waage replied by saying that "the entire fault was with the board; they had broken the constitution of the Society and had laid themselves open to arrest, and the membership could force the board to abide by the Society's laws, by taking out a writ of mandamus." Dr. [Anders] Doe had nothing to do with the calling of the special meeting. A nominations committee was elected. It is composed of Captain John Anderson, Attorney Waage, and Dr. Sandberg.

    Fifty members of the Tabitha Hospital Society called a special meeting to elect a nominations committee in accordance with the bylaws of the Society. The meeting was held last Sunday ...

    Norwegian
    II D 3, IV
  • Skandinaven -- January 12, 1902
    The Public School Crisis (Editorial in English)

    The crisis that threatens to cripple the public school system of Chicago is a present-day illustration of the saying of the Good Book that the sins of the parents are visited upon their children. The children of Chicago must now suffer because their parents, the voters of Chicago, have permitted themselves to be hoodwinked in the discharge of their duties as citizens. During the last years the efficiency of the schools has been seriously impaired by doubtful experiments and extravagance. The limit of profligacy has been reached at last, and we are face to face with the necessity of closing some of the schools or paying the teachers starvation wages as the only alternatives of a condition of hopeless bankruptcy.

    As usual, when he is confronted with the inevitable consequences of his misrule, Mayor Harrison shrugs his shoulders and complains of lack of funds. According to the Mayor and his school board the present crisis is due to insufficient revenues. It is only too true that the revenues have been inadequate in the 2hands of the Mayor's school board; but it is not true that they would have been inadequate under a careful and capable financial management of the schools. The expenditures have increased nearly seventy per cent since Carter H. Harrison took the reins of the government, and the school board is now facing the largest deficit in the history of the city.

    The annual appropiations for school purposes for the last six years figure as follows:

    1896 $5,879,300.
    1897 6,530,600.
    1898 6,118,413.
    1899 6,898,661.
    1900 10,206,668.
    1901 9,886,000.

    Here is an increase of some seventy per cent. The increase in the number of pupils from 1896 to 1901 was only twelve per cent, while the number of teachers 3increased eighteen per cent. The cost of instruction per capita was $26.45 in the school year of 1896-97, but $31.41 in the school year of 1900-01. Mr. Harrison's school board has added $4,007,300 to the annual expenditures that were sufficient during Swift's administration. The instruction of a child has cost $4.96 per annum more under Harrison than under Swift. If the instructions were so much better than before there would be some compensating advantages; but the general impression is that it is poorer.

    Mayor Harrison was scarcely seated in the saddle before he and his henchmen reached out for the possession of the schools. The old members of the board were gradually replaced by trusty Harrison followers; A. G. Lane, under whose able, non-partisan administration the schools had attained a standing that was the pride of the city, was given his walking papers, and the era of spoliation was inaugurated. In the language of a member of the school committee of the City Council: "The members of the school board have filled up the teachers' pay rolls until they threaten to force the closing of the schools. Members have been getting places for their friends and relatives. Now the pay rolls are 4swamping them. They are willing to have the whole force suffer rather than have their friends taken off the pay rolls."

    There is no mystery whatever about it: the school fund has been looted in common with every other fund within the reach of the Burke-Harrison machine. The result is only what we predicted by a minority of the voters and ought to have been foreseen by all. The people are now reaping the legitimate reward of their short-sightedness, prejudices, and folly. But the pity of it all is that the innocent children must needs be the chief sufferers.

    The crisis that threatens to cripple the public school system of Chicago is a present-day illustration of the saying of the Good Book that the sins of the parents are ...

    Norwegian
    I A 1 a, I F 6
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 15, 1902
    The Swedish National Society Elects New Officers

    The Swedish National Society held its annual meeting last week and elected the following officers: Chairman: S. A. Nelson; 1st vice-Chairman: Charles Bengtson; 2nd vice-chairman: Mrs. Gronlund; recording secretary: Oscar Olander; corresponding secretary: Mrs. Othelia Myhrman; treasurer: K. E. Ostergren; sergeant-at-arms: Louis Magnuson, Otto Anderson was elected director. There was a balance in the treasury of $1,469.91.

    The Swedish National Society held its annual meeting last week and elected the following officers: Chairman: S. A. Nelson; 1st vice-Chairman: Charles Bengtson; 2nd vice-chairman: Mrs. Gronlund; recording secretary: Oscar ...

    Swedish
    II D 1
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 15, 1902
    Swedish Women Plan Benefit Feast

    The Swedish-American Women's Club held its annual meeting last Friday and elected officers for the year 1902. The club is planning a feast to be held at Phoenix hall, February 14 for the benefit of the poor.

    The Swedish-American Women's Club held its annual meeting last Friday and elected officers for the year 1902. The club is planning a feast to be held at Phoenix hall, February ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, I K
  • Abendpost -- January 15, 1902
    Morris Rosenbaum Dead

    Morris Rosenbaum, president of Rosenbaum Brothers, who are located at the Board of Trade Building, died this morning of heart failure. The deceased was during the last twenty seven years a respected member of the Board of Trade.

    Mr. Rosenbaum, was born on January 30, 1837, in Schwabach, Bavaria and received a good school education in Germany. In his thirteenth year, he came with his parents to Dubuque, Iowa. Here the young Rosenbaum, soon obtained a position in a grocery store.

    In 1874, he came to Chicago where he devoted himself to the grain trade.

    Morris Rosenbaum, president of Rosenbaum Brothers, who are located at the Board of Trade Building, died this morning of heart failure. The deceased was during the last twenty seven years ...

    Jewish
    II A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 15, 1902
    [A Swedish Feast]

    Svithiod Lodge of I. O. S. Held a family feast and ball last Sunday night at the North Side Turner Hall. The end of Christmas celebrations, according to Swedish traditions, end January 13, hence the reason for this family Christmas festival. The dance music was furnished by the Svithiod music corps. Young and old ones seemed to enjoy themselves during the whole evening.

    Svithiod Lodge of I. O. S. Held a family feast and ball last Sunday night at the North Side Turner Hall. The end of Christmas celebrations, according to Swedish traditions, ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, III B 3 b
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 15, 1902
    Charles H. Hoglund Passes Obituary

    Justice of Peace, Charles H. Hoglund, well-known among both Swedes and Americans, in the city and in this State, died last Friday. He was born in Sweden in 1861, and came to Chicago with his family when he was ten years old. He received his diploma as a lawyer at the Union College of Law in 1887. Mr. Hoglund became a Justice of Peace at North town in 1891. He was one of the founders of The Swedish-American Republican League of Illinois.

    Justice of Peace, Charles H. Hoglund, well-known among both Swedes and Americans, in the city and in this State, died last Friday. He was born in Sweden in 1861, and ...

    Swedish
    I F 5, IV
  • Narod Polski -- January 15, 1902
    [Theatrical News]

    Polish student's annual play by the Polish Literary Club of St. Stanislaus School took place last Wednesday Jan. 18th. The Polish students of that institution conducted a very difficult play entitled Hermenogild or (two crowns). The role of the feeble king was played by the student, M. Wenta. He played his part wonderfully.

    Mr. Domachowski played Hermenogild's part to the taste and satisfaction of the most particular observer. As to the pose, action, enthusiasm, noble charcterization, confidence in his part and strong attachment to the Catholic faith for which he suffered exile and imprisonment, Mr. Domachowski played his part completely. His acting brought tears to the eyes of the audience. His brother Mr. Rekared Domachowski took part of loving brother realistically. So was played part of Goswin's son and decent teacher of Hermenogild Bozand played by Mr. Przybyt and R. Olszewski. Mr. A. Kubiak played the part of intriguer (plotter) in a masterly manner. Fr. Czerwinsky in a role of Arigmund presented an excellent type of a rowdy. K. Swoboda and M. Szlachetka executed their parts as king's messengers (envoys) and intriguers very well. The light effects combined with appropriate scenery reveals the artistic - abilities of the stage manager. The play was a great success. The hall was filled to its capacity.

    Polish student's annual play by the Polish Literary Club of St. Stanislaus School took place last Wednesday Jan. 18th. The Polish students of that institution conducted a very difficult play ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1