The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 04, 1896
    [New Polish Store]

    Mr. A. X. Centella, Mr. A. Wachowski, and Mr. John Szostakowski opened a wholesale grocery business on January 2, 1896, at the corner of Washington and Union Streets.

    They ask their countrymen to support this new enterprise, and assure them that they will find it more to their advantage to trade in their store than in stores of people of other nationalities.

    Mr. A. X. Centella, Mr. A. Wachowski, and Mr. John Szostakowski opened a wholesale grocery business on January 2, 1896, at the corner of Washington and Union Streets. They ask ...

    Polish
    II A 2, III A
  • Svornost -- January 04, 1896
    [Alois Novak Enters New Field]

    Mr. Alois Novak, noted violin virtuoso, who has gained approval of the local public during his concerts, before the Chicago audience, has ventured into a new field of activity by teaching violin.

    Mr. Novak is a graduate of the Conservatory of Music at Prague. We are sure that he will give excellent artistic direction to his pupils.

    Mr. Novak's address is 157 Banker Street, or 724 West 18th Street.

    Mr. Alois Novak, noted violin virtuoso, who has gained approval of the local public during his concerts, before the Chicago audience, has ventured into a new field of activity by ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 06, 1896
    Parochial Report of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Church for 1895

    We announced in the first part of last year that a book was to be published containing a complete financial statement of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish from its very beginning.

    This book has been distributed among the members of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish and has been accepted without a single complaint.

    And now, in order to continue this practice, the parish will publish a financial report every year.

    The first one, from January 1, 1895, to January 1, 1896, was distributed on New Year's Day.

    From the copy sent to us, we note that during the past year the parish's income amounted to $46,034.76, which sum includes the following: pew rent, $15,967.35; 2church collections, $10,107.79; parochial collections, $8,646.25; school dues, $8,370.63.

    Expenses during the year amounted to $44,008.52. Included in this sum are the salaries of priests and church helpers, as well as daily expenditures, $8,189.75; upkeep of the buildings, $7,530.35; upkeep of other church properties, $2,012.20; upkeep of school, $13,147.31; interest on loans, $10,470.94; diocesan expenses, $1,355.00; etc., etc. The not income, therefore, was $2,026.24.

    This balance will be used to pay part of the debts of the parish, which amounted to $172,489.45, as of January 1, 1896.

    After considering that the value of all church property (enormous buildings occupying practically a whole block) amounts to at least $600,000 (probably much more than that), we must agree that the financial condition of the parish, considering the terribly hard times we are going through, is comparatively quite prosperous.

    3

    This financial report of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish is signed by Reverend Eugene Siedlaczek, who is acting pastor, and by the parish committee, composed of A. W. Rudnicki, Albert Jendrzejek, John Kortas, Frank Maca, John Lamczyk, John Kolodziejski, Frank Okon, John Maca, John Arkuszewski, and Paul Ratkowski.

    As it is evident, this report--itemized, published, sent to every member of the parish, verified by a committee of experienced and honest people--is the best and most decisive answer to the scurrilous and libelous lies of enemies of our religion and our parish, enemies who want to destroy everything and create disturbances.

    It would seem now that they would be silenced. Not so. Nothing in the world will stop them from lying, attacking, and libeling. As proof of this, we point to the gangster-like tactics of D. P. (Translator's note: A rival Polish paper), who has begun a campaign against the report. Its clowning articles are a long river of mud. We don't know which to admire most--their foolishness or their brazenness.

    4

    If we mention this paper here it is just to show everybody what is the object of this A. P. A. [American Protective Association] and gangster-like paper and others like it.

    Their object is clear and simple: to distort the truth; to confuse logic and even figures; to paint black what is white; to muddle the waters, and, in this way, by their gibberish talk and underhand method, to lead the people falsely to the Independents' swindle, so that they may lose here and in eternity.

    Their object is perfidious, and the work of these sons of evil and the devil is shameful!

    We announced in the first part of last year that a book was to be published containing a complete financial statement of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish from its very ...

    Polish
    III C, I C, IV
  • Abendpost -- January 06, 1896
    Lessing Evening.

    With a memorial celebration for the pioneer Art-Critic and dramatic poet, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, the Art and Literature Club brought yesterday, the first series of its poet's and composers' evenings to a conclusion...Yesterday evening offered to the 200 guests all types of true artistic enjoyment, but on the other side many bitter disappointments. Lessing's literary value received full credit in a masterly lecture of Dr. Emil Hirsch, while the recitals of the Messrs. Schutt and Merker hardly could satisfy expectations.

    A master performance was the oration of Dr. Hirsch who understood it in a most effective way to picture the life and work of the great Dramaturque and to captivate the listeners to the last. The lecturer pointed out that Lessing must be regarded as the pioneer poet to whom the German people is indebted for the preservation and refinement of its language. In his work "Nathan" the poet preached the gospel of love of mankind for all times and for all the people and pointed tolerance out as the greatest of all virtues of humanity. At the end the orator invited the Germans of Chicago to erect 2to their great intellectual hero aneverlasting monument in form of a German library for the Chicago University, a legacy, that shall carry Lessing's name and spread his glory also on American soil.

    It is unnecessary to add that these words were greeted by enthusiastic applause. Also the recitals of the pianist Miss Regina Zeisler and of the violin virtuoso Mr. Luigi von Kunits deserve to receive honorable mention.

    With a memorial celebration for the pioneer Art-Critic and dramatic poet, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, the Art and Literature Club brought yesterday, the first series of its poet's and composers' evenings ...

    German
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g, III B 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 07, 1896
    Financial Report of St. Josephat Parish

    We have received a copy of a printed financial report of the St. Josephat Bishop and Martyr Parish in Chicago (Lake View) for the year 1895, from January 1, 1895 to January 1, 1896.

    This annual report was distributed among the members of the parish on New Year's Day.

    The regular income of the parish last year amounted to $6,039.72 (included in this amount are pew rent, $4,006.05; Sunday and holiday collections, $970.58; etc.). Extraordinary income amounted to $12,742.14 (including deposits of $4,995; home and monthly collections, $4,874.40; school dues, $2,009.01, etc.). Total income was $18,781.86.

    Regular expenses amounted to $2,481.18 (included in this sum are $1,555.32 for the priests; $600 for the organist; $255.86 for minor church expenses; 2etc.). Extraordinary expenses were $11,986.60 (including repaid deposits of $8,305; $1,625 for the Sisters; coal and wood, $436.10; etc.). Total expenditures amounted to $14,467.68.

    The balance in the treasury amounts to $4,314.08.

    Including the deposits newly received and deducting those repaid from the total indebtedness, it appears that the St. Josephat Parish has a debt of only $2,335.92, which in reality can be considered as a private loan and not a bank loan.

    This financial report was signed by Reverend Francis Lange, pastor, who, at the conclusion of the report, writes the following very timely note:

    "Various inimical articles published in Dziennik Polski (Polish News) and Kropidlo (Sprinkler), attacking our parish, are nothing more than figments of the paganistic imagination of those fallen away from our faith.

    3

    "Publishing lies against our pastor and this peaceful parish has only one object in view: to create disturbances and hatred of the people toward the priest and, finally, to increase the number of faithless, among whom the writers of these articles belong.

    "They are the real brothers of Antichrist, who presumably is to appear riding on a red-hot stove at the end of the world; they are already showing their hatred toward Jesus in their poisonous articles."

    To these words of the pastor of St. Josephat Parish nothing need be added. They describe excellently those uncalled-for guardians of Polish parishes.

    We have received a copy of a printed financial report of the St. Josephat Bishop and Martyr Parish in Chicago (Lake View) for the year 1895, from January 1, 1895 ...

    Polish
    III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 07, 1896
    From St. Hedwig's Parish (Letter)

    On Sunday, January 5, through the efforts of Reverend John Piechowski, a new Polish young men's society was organized in the St. Hedwig Parish, to be known as the "Cadets", under the protection of St. Hedwig. All together about eighteen young men have signed applications for membership. The officers are Joseph Czychanski, president; John B. Wachowski, recording secretary; Joseph Naskrent, financial secretary; and John Pallash, treasurer.

    The officers in command of the Cadets are John Pallash, captain, and John B. Wachowski, lieutenant.

    Please address all correspondence to John B. Wachowski, recording secretary, 1062 North Hoyne Avenue.

    On Sunday, January 5, through the efforts of Reverend John Piechowski, a new Polish young men's society was organized in the St. Hedwig Parish, to be known as the "Cadets", ...

    Polish
    III E, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 08, 1896
    From Mr. Zukotynski's Studio

    Mr. Thaddeus Zukotynski, the well-known artist-painter, is devoting all his energies in preparing sketches for a great picture of St. Stanislaus Kostka. This picture will complete the series of wonderful, artistic paintings by our artist for the St. Stanislaus Kostka Church. Mr. Zukotynski will commence work in the church in a few days. This picture will be finished before Easter.

    Mr. Thaddeus Zukotynski, the well-known artist-painter, is devoting all his energies in preparing sketches for a great picture of St. Stanislaus Kostka. This picture will complete the series of wonderful, ...

    Polish
    II A 3 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 08, 1896
    Thank You

    We wish to express our sincere thanks to Reverend Casimir Sztuczko, pastor of Holy Trinity Parish, and the members of his parish for their generous donation of $21.28. This money was collected for our Polish Hospital at a school children's New Year celebration.

    We also wish to thank Mr. and Mrs. Stanislaus and Valerie Slominski for their kind donation of twenty dollars for our Polish Hospital.

    We shall remember our generous benefactors in our daily prayers and will implore God to reward them a hundredfold.

    Sisters of Nazareth.

    We wish to express our sincere thanks to Reverend Casimir Sztuczko, pastor of Holy Trinity Parish, and the members of his parish for their generous donation of $21.28. This money ...

    Polish
    II D 3, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 08, 1896
    The Project to Colonize Poles in the State of Washington Is Progressing (Editorial)

    From the Buffalo Przeglad Tygodniowy (Weekly Review) we have gained a quite interesting bit of information regarding the plan of a group of Poles to settle in the State of Washington, on the Pacific Coast.

    This matter, which originated in Buffalo, has excited a lot of our citizens in Chicago.

    "On New Year's Day," writes the Przeglad, "a meeting was held in Kosciusko hall, at which this matter was thoroughly discussed.

    "According to the lengthy reports of the delegates, it seems that this state offers conditions that will assure the Polish settlers independence within a 2short time. It was therefore decided to prepare the way for colonization at once. The first party of settlers will leave Buffalo this month.

    "Mr. Jurek, 283 Detroit Street, is in charge of this party. Further information can be obtained at the office of Przeglad Tygodniowy.

    "The publisher of Przeglad, Mr. Wrzesinski, has departed for the state of Washing ton, where he will join the delegaies and travel over the entire state; as a trained agriculturist he will be able to choose the most appropriate place for our future Polish settlers."

    It is evident that the project is progressing. It is now necessary that it be placed on a firm and sound basis, both in the legal and business sense.

    We wish there was more frankness regarding this matter.

    To date all we know of it is from random articles in the Przeglad. We do not know:

    3

    In what legal form was the project organized? who is the head of the entire undertaking? What are the conditions?

    Such secrecy can only throw a certain shadow on the undertaking.

    We consider the question of settling Poles in a properly chosen state as very important. The state of Washington, as our own investigations have proven, is one of the best places for this purpose.

    We therefore look on this project to direct Polish settlers there with a great deal of sympathy and curiosity.

    But we also wish that it be placed on such a basis as to assure a permanent and successful future. We have seen many similar projects, partly senseless and soon discarded, conceived for the purpose of taking advantage of our people. Only truth and constructive criticism can convince us that this particular project has a sound and healthy foundation.

    From the Buffalo Przeglad Tygodniowy (Weekly Review) we have gained a quite interesting bit of information regarding the plan of a group of Poles to settle in the State of ...

    Polish
    I L, I C
  • Svornost -- January 08, 1896
    [Directory of Freethinking Publications to Be Prepared]

    The Liberal Svojan Community in Chicago is editing a list of free-thinking publications of all nations to enlighten the American-Bohemians in the problems of supporting all free-thinking societies.

    This new publication is called "Svojan" and is published four times a year. Single copies are sold at twenty-five cents. Subscriptions should be made to the authorized agent of the Liberal Community, Mr. Al. Vanoricka, 150 West 12th Street.

    The Liberal Svojan Community in Chicago is editing a list of free-thinking publications of all nations to enlighten the American-Bohemians in the problems of supporting all free-thinking societies. This new ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 2, III C