The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 09, 1896
    What Our Citizens Think of the Attacks by Dziennik Polski on St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish (Correspondence)

    Dear Editor: It is impossible to listen any longer to the babblings and mad attacks on the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish which appear daily in the Polish News, presumably Polish but actually published by Jews and unbelievers.

    These troublesome gentlemen must have their noses rubbed once....and well. I am asking you, therefore, to please publish my letter in your paper.

    The question I am asking everyone is: What business have such dregs of humanity with parochial reports? What good have they ever done for the parish? Did any one of them ever contribute one penny to the St. Stanislaus Kostka Church?

    Most likely they did not! And if this is a fact, then my dear sirs, do not 2stick your noses where you have not contributed a penny or you may get them rubbed the wrong way.

    I am a simple person, but I can see what your aim is: you want to confuse the people of good will and muddle up the water in order to catch the fat fish. But you will not succeed. We will do without you and your wisecracks. You claim that you are Poles, yet you wish to destroy the Polish churches, exterminate the Polish priests, and step on that which is dearest and most holy to us. You are wolves in sheep's clothing. Your claws are all too evident. In every sentence you say, in spite of your assertion that you are acting in good faith, your hate and hostility to everything that is Polish and Catholic is so plain that you cannot fool even the feeble-minded.

    You are worse than the Jews. At least we know they are enemies of Christ, but you seemingly pray at the foot of a statue while the devil is hidden under your skin....

    Your mouth is full of honeyed words, but in these words there is poison. You 3want to lead our people to anarchy and infernal insanity while taking advantage of them. We got along without you before....we will do without you now.

    Every day you repeat: "Teach Polish to the children," but this is your most monstrous lie. Of what use is the Polish tongue to them while you are trying to destroy everything that is Polish and Catholic? Why, it would be much simpler for you to advise teaching them the Russian tongue--you would then be believed!

    It would be better if you, yourselves, would study Polish for even the children laugh at your miserable writings, not to mention the older folks.

    But it is time I closed this letter.

    In the name of common sense and justice I appeal to all my Polish countrymen and to all people of good will not to read a paper so vile as Dziennik Polski (Polish News). After all, of what good is it to anybody? A person gets 4smeared by it.....Perhaps it will convince a person who is inexperienced and confuse him so that he will not be able to tell the difference between good and bad--and then they will laugh at him as at the very devil himself, Oh, yes! I sincerely urge my fellow brethren: guard yourselves from this evil, and you can be sure of yourselves.....There is a Polish saying that "One on guard is guarded by God himself."

    These are my sincere wishes to my fellow Catholics and Poles.

    Your brother,

    Albert Melin

    658 Dickson Street.

    Dear Editor: It is impossible to listen any longer to the babblings and mad attacks on the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish which appear daily in the Polish News, presumably Polish ...

    Polish
    I C, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 09, 1896
    The Polish Roman Catholic Union in Good Condition

    The financial condition of the Polish Roman Catholic Union is eminently satisfactory in spite of the lies and calumnies cast upon it by anarchistic pamphlets and the Senator's organ in Wisconsin.

    The report for the fourth month after the convention, published in the last issue of Wiara I Ojczyzna (Faith and Fatherland), is sufficient proof.

    This report is as follows: In the fourth month, that is, from December 1, 1895, to January 1, 1896:

    Income $7,580.36
    Expense 7,212.05
    Balance from December 368.31
    Balance from first quarter $1.698.50
    Net balance, as of Jan. 1, 1896 $2,066.81
    2

    This is convincing proof that all talks to the effect that the Polish Roman Catholic Union is failing are deliberate and shameless falsehoods. Cash on hand is growing greater, and when the debts are paid this balance will be doubled.

    Jealous complaints, lies, and accusations cannot stop this.

    The financial condition of the Polish Roman Catholic Union is eminently satisfactory in spite of the lies and calumnies cast upon it by anarchistic pamphlets and the Senator's organ in ...

    Polish
    III C, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 09, 1896
    Dr. Stupnicki Is Leaving for Washington

    The colonization project for Poles on the Pacific Coast has created quite a lot of interest here in Chicago.

    A group of Polish citizens under the directorship of Dr. Stupnicki have become interested in it.

    Dr. Stupnicki, accompanied by another person, will travel to the states of Washington and Oregon, to investigate conditions for settlers. The doctor will spend several weeks there and on his return will share his findings with those interested in this project.

    Dr. Stupnicki has also promised to send our paper a report.

    The colonization project for Poles on the Pacific Coast has created quite a lot of interest here in Chicago. A group of Polish citizens under the directorship of Dr. Stupnicki ...

    Polish
    I L
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1896
    Contribution for the Kosciusko Monument

    The sum of four dollars and fifty cents was brought to our editorial offices today for the Kosciusko Monument in Chicago. The person who brought this contribution has asked us to mention that "Kuba the shepherd and other shepherds are honoring in this manner the hero in peasant dress."

    The sum of four dollars and fifty cents was brought to our editorial offices today for the Kosciusko Monument in Chicago. The person who brought this contribution has asked us ...

    Polish
    II C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1896
    Nowe Zycie Begs for Help

    We have been reliably informed that Nowe Zycie (New Life), the local "A. P. A.-istic" and anarchistic paper, has sent a communication to various groups of the Polish Alliance asking them for financial assistance....due to hard times and imminent failure. This is a fact. One of these begging letters has been shown to us. No comments necessary! [Translator's note: A. P. A. stands for American Protective Association, an anti-Catholic organization.]

    We have been reliably informed that Nowe Zycie (New Life), the local "A. P. A.-istic" and anarchistic paper, has sent a communication to various groups of the Polish Alliance asking ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 2 d 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1896
    Polish Theatrical Club in Avondale (Correspondence)

    A meeting of the newly organized Polish Theatrical Club of Avondale was held on Tuesday evening, January 7, in the St. Hyacinth Parish school hall.

    There were twenty-six members present, both men and women.

    The pastor, Reverend J. Gieburowski, called the meeting to order and explained the object and aims the club should aspire to. These are education, mental development, and moral uplift. "The members of the club," he said, "should endeavor to study Polish literature and Polish history, preserve their Polish tongue, and entertain themselves and others with theatrical performances." He strongly urged us to keep on working and educating ourselves. The reverend pastor's speech was warmly and enthusiastically applauded.

    2

    The election of the following administration followed: Joseph Grabowiecki, president; Menceslaus Lisiecki, vice-president; S. Zahajkiewicz, director; Paul Myks, recording secretary; Mrs. Mary Ann Lisiecki, financial secretary; Ludwig Tyrakowski, treasurer; Anthony Szatkowski, costumer; Mrs. Catherine Klafta, manager of the wardrobe; Bernard Bialkowski, librarian; August Kochanski, marshal; Reverend J. Gieburowski, chaplain.

    The next entertainment of the club will be held on Tuesday, January 14, at seven thirty o'clock in the evening, at Mr. Grabowiecki's hall. Any person wishing to join the club is invited to this meeting.

    Paul Myks, recording secretary,

    1802 Homan Avenue.

    A meeting of the newly organized Polish Theatrical Club of Avondale was held on Tuesday evening, January 7, in the St. Hyacinth Parish school hall. There were twenty-six members present, ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, I A 3, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1896
    The Political Campaign Is Approaching (Editorial)

    The spring elections are coming closer. The political campaign, especially in our own Sixteenth Ward, shows definite signs of awakening, and our own countrymen are decidedly interested in it. And they have reason to be!

    Lately, due especially to the split among our Polish citizens and numerous switchings to other parties, the old political influence of Chicago Poles, based chiefly on their adherence to the Democratic party, has been waning rapidly. A number of Polish candidates were defeated in the elections, and even in the Sixteenth Ward, that undefeated stronghold of Polish political strength, the last elections gave us a German alderman.

    We are considered a zero now in political circles. The Republican mayor of 2Chicago taunts us. Hundreds of Poles, formerly employed by the city, are now blowing on their fingers.

    We must exert all our strength to change this situation. The time to do so is in the present year.

    This is a political year. The spring elections to the city council have, it is true, only a local significance, but this local political situation is of great importance to us. Let us gain a permanent stronghold in our ward first, and whatever we may gain in the general political situation will be fine for us here. We must, therefore, regain some of the advantages we have lost. And that isn't all. The fall elections are of much greater importance to us. These are the presidential and state elections. Here much greater issues will be at stake, and the campaign may become very hot.

    The bitter fight between the two major political parties which will decide the 3future elections emphasizes the importance of the moment and permits us to wield our political strength to the greatest extent.

    This strength is today quite problematical. We are broken up into fractional parts. We advance in one hundred different directions. We quarrel among ourselves and as Poles in the same political party to which we presumably belong. Individual selfishness and momentary gain, control practically all of us. Our adherence to either political party is uncertain. We are unable to decide what we are and in which direction will we proceed at a certain time.

    Briefly, we lack organization, and this dooms us.

    At one time we had Democratic, Republican and other leagues, but today it is all gone with the wind--forgotten. These leagues, it is true, acted quite sloppily; they accomplished very little; still they were representative. They were the symbols of certain political aspirations. They were proof of our own 4existence in the political world.

    We do not recommend that it is necessary to return to this form of political organization. But we do insist emphatically that some sort of all-embracing political organization is most necessary.

    We refer not only to the local ward organizations, but also to a widespread organization in the party and, finally--if it is at all feasible--an organization of Poles from all political parties, to promote the welfare of our own nationality.

    Without an organization we are lost. United we will be able to regain at least a part of what we lost and perhaps gain some new political positions. This is certain.

    We must remember this today, because there is no time to organize when the war 5is on. The organization work must be undertaken immediately; the ranks must be filled out and the privates must be armed before the battle.

    This is too important a matter to end it with this one article. We will revert to it many times and will discuss the terms and conditions under which such desirable organization of various Polish political entities in Chicago and Cook County could be created.

    The spring elections are coming closer. The political campaign, especially in our own Sixteenth Ward, shows definite signs of awakening, and our own countrymen are decidedly interested in it. And ...

    Polish
    I F 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1896
    [Poles Send Books to Pennsylvania]

    Gazeta Katolicka (Catholic Gazette) announces that the Polish League is sending a one-hundred-volume shipment of books to Pennsylvania. This is the eighth shipment already.

    Gazeta Katolicka (Catholic Gazette) announces that the Polish League is sending a one-hundred-volume shipment of books to Pennsylvania. This is the eighth shipment already.

    Polish
    II B 2 a
  • Revyen -- January 11, 1896
    [Benefit Concert Given]

    p. 2. - The concert given by "Harmonien" for the benefit of the Danish Orphanage Home on Perry Ave. showed a profit of about $500. Revyen of Feb. 29th, 1896, gives the exact sum as $593.82 which has been handed over to the orphanage home.

    p. 2. - The concert given by "Harmonien" for the benefit of the Danish Orphanage Home on Perry Ave. showed a profit of about $500. Revyen of Feb. 29th, 1896, ...

    Danish
    II D 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 11, 1896
    [Pacific Coast States Attracts Poles]

    A Polish Colonization Society has been organized in Bridgeport (Chicago district). It will send three delegates to investigate conditions for colonization in the states of Washington and Oregon.

    A Polish Colonization Society has been organized in Bridgeport (Chicago district). It will send three delegates to investigate conditions for colonization in the states of Washington and Oregon.

    Polish
    I L