The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1894
    Polish Welfare Work

    The Welfare Committee of the Polish National Alliance Societies has collected $270.01, and distributed $148.83 among the Polish needy families. At present there is $121.18 in the treasury.

    The Welfare Committee of the Polish National Alliance Societies has collected $270.01, and distributed $148.83 among the Polish needy families. At present there is $121.18 in the treasury.

    Polish
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1894
    Recent Publications of the Polish Publishing Company

    Realizing the great difficulty and cost of importing school books from Europe, and realizing also the need for books that deal with American and Polish affairs, that is, books that offer instruction in reading and writing, books that cover important facts of Polish and American history, etc., the Polish Publishing Company has published a wide variety of the most essential books for Polish parochial schools in America.

    The list is as follows [All published in Polish]:

    School Books

    Primer, printed on good quality paper and illustrated with beautiful pictures, 79 pages. Cost per copy: 20 cents.

    First Reader, a 96 page book, illustrated and printed on good paper. Cost per copy: 25 cents.

    2

    Second Reader, 176 pages, with illustrations. Cost per copy: 30 cents.

    Third Reader, richly illustrated, 308 pages. Cost per copy: 40 cents.

    Fourth Reader, 400 pages, with illustrations. Cost per copy: 50 cents.

    Arithmetic, Part I, contains fractions, examples and tables, 106 pages. Cost per copy: 30 cents.

    Arithmetic, Part II, contains fractions, division, etc., 106 pages. Cost per copy: 30 cents.

    Bible History, by Benzinger, 349 pages with illustrations, contains a rescription of His Eminence Pope Leo XIII, and the approbation and recommendation of the Most Reverend Archbishops of Germany, Switzerland and America. Cost per copy: 50 cents.

    Bible History, by Herder, a condensed form, with 46 illustrations and 87 pages.

    3
    Cost per copy: 25 cents.
    Advanced Catechism of the Roman Catholic Church for Polish parochial schools. Cost per copy: 25 cents.
    Polish History Sketches, by B. Klarkowski[local author] 40 cents.
    Elementary Catechism of the Roman Catholic Church for Polish parochial schools 15 cents.

    Novels and Plays

    Dziecie Starego Miasta (Child of the Old City), by J. L. Kraszewski 25 cents.
    Mieszczanska Duma (A Girl's Dream), a short story 5 cents.
    Krzyz Mogilny (The Cross on the Mound), 1863-1864 15 cents.
    Szary Proch (Gray Powder), by M. Rodziewicz 20 cents.
    Klopoty Chinczyka (The Troubles of a Chinaman), by Jules Verne 20 cents.
    4
    Szkaplerz Matki (Mother's Scapular), by I. Machnikowski 15 cents.
    Ze Swiata (From the World), novelettes, 20 cents.
    Krol Nocy (King of Night), by A. de Lamothe, two volumes 40 cents.
    Kosynierzy (Soldiers with Scythes), by A. de Lamothe, a story of the Polish Insurrection of 1863 based on true facts, with illustrations, two volumes $1.25
    Two volumes in brochure form 80 cents.
    Polish Geography Manual, fifty illustrations and eight maps 35 cents.
    Ramotki (Literary Squibs), by A. Wilkonski 10 cents.
    Dziecie Maryi (Mary's Child), a novel, 25 cents.
    Na Lono Matki (On Mother's Lap), a novel, 10 cents.
    5
    Cudowne Groszki (Magic Pennies), and Syn Dziadowski (Beggar's Son), by S. Zahajkiewicz 10 cents.
    Ksiaze Czarnoksieznikow (The Prince of Magicians), by S. Zahajkiewicz 10 cents.
    Dzieci Izraela (Children of Israel), a biblical drama, by S. Zahajkiewicz 15 cents.
    Bog Nie Opusci (God Will Not Forsake), a story by L. Anczyc 10 cents.
    Czeczotka (Linnet), a story of the days of old, by Peter J. Bykowski 15 cents.
    Kwiat Paproci (The Fern) a three act play, by S. Zahajkiewicz 15 cents.

    Po Roku 1830 (After 1830), from B. Boleslawity's

    6
    Z. Tulaczow (The Refugees), by J. I. Kraszewski 25 cents.
    Syn Kmieci (Peasant Son), a historical narrative of the times of John Sobieski, by Theresa Jadwiga 15 cents.

    Special Books

    Catholic Calendar, for Polish Catholics in America, for 1894 25 cents.
    Regulamin Mustry (Drill Regulations), for all Military Societies, 117 pages 50 cents.
    The Constitution of May 3, 1791 5 cents.
    Powinszowanie I Deklamacye (Congratulation and Declamation), by S. Zahajkiewicz 10 cents.

    Moje Lyczenie Woda (My Healing With Water), by Reverend Sebastian Kneipp

    7
    $1.00
    Tak Zyc Potrzeba (How to Live), by Reverend Sebastian Kneipp. $1.00
    Protekcya a Wolny Handel (Protection and Free Trade), by H. George 10 cents.
    Historya Polska (Polish History) 30 cents.
    Deklamator Polski (Polish Elocution) 30 cents.
    Krolowie Polscy (Polish Kings), biographical sketches, illustrated 30 cents.
    Tuzin Komedyi (A Dozen Comedies), for young people $1.00

    If books are purchased in large numbers a substantial discount is given.

    Realizing the great difficulty and cost of importing school books from Europe, and realizing also the need for books that deal with American and Polish affairs, that is, books that ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3, III C, III H, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1894
    Polish Mass Meeting and the Polish League in America (Editorial)

    We have very important and gratifying information for our readers.

    The proposed Polish mass meeting to establish a Polish League in America--an idea which has been the object of much publicity by the Polish press-has ceased to be just a project and has become a reality. A group of well-meaning people took this matter into their hands, after some consultation made a definite step in this direction yesterday.

    An invitation was written and signed calling all American Poles to a mass meeting to be held in Chicago on May 3, 1894. At this meeting the year 1894 will be dedicated to Kosciusko and a large Polish organization, called Liga Polska W Ameryce (Polish League in America), will be organized. The 2organization will be patterned after the one organized by prominent Polish patriots and clergymen in the province of Posen in 1848.

    The Polish League in America will be very large in scope and will represent all the Poles in America. Not being a fraternal organization, but one to serve our motherland exclusively, the League will not have sick, death, or any other direct material benefits. Its aims being idealistic, it will work for the benefit of the community in patriotic, religious, educational, economic, and other fields. The League, which will not interfere in the affairs of other organizations, unless it is to wish them success in their good work, appeals to all parishes, societies, and organizations for their co-operation.

    The League plans to collect a general contribution of, say, one cent a month from every Pole. The funds thus collected will be used for the realization of its aims, one of which is education.

    3

    The authority of the League will be vested in the Executive Committee and its branches.

    The people who planned this League are affiliated with many Polish organizations and represent many factions. They are headed by Mr. Erasmus Jerzmanowski (from New York City but now residing in Chicago), one of the leading representatives of the Poles and a very generous man.

    So much for the present about the new plan, the significance of which is understood by every one.

    The appeal in question, as well as a pamphlet, will be distributed among the Poles as soon as the work of printing it is finished. These two documents contain all the details of the new plan, a plan which may determine our future fate. We recommend them to our readers. In the meantime, we are glad that the first step has already been taken towards the realization of 4this matter, which is so important to all Poles in America.

    We have very important and gratifying information for our readers. The proposed Polish mass meeting to establish a Polish League in America--an idea which has been the object of much ...

    Polish
    III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1894
    A Timely Donation Made by Visitor for Polish Hospital

    Erasmus Jerzmanowski, who recently paid the Chicago Poles a short visit, has shown the measure of his kindness by giving Reverend A. Nowicki one hundred dollars for the Polish Hospital, which is operated by the Nazareth Sisters. This kindly deed again shows the attitude Mr. Jerzmanowski takes toward our noble causes.

    Erasmus Jerzmanowski, who recently paid the Chicago Poles a short visit, has shown the measure of his kindness by giving Reverend A. Nowicki one hundred dollars for the Polish Hospital, ...

    Polish
    II D 3, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1894
    Benefit Concert for Polish Destitute Families to Be Given January 14

    A benefit concert, play and dance, sponsored by the Welfare Committee of the Polish National Alliance Societies, is to be given Sunday, January 14, at Schoenhofen's Hall. A variety program of entertainment has been completed. A musical play "Drama of One Night," assisted by the Chopin and Wanda Choral societies, will be one of the features of the evening. Solos will be given by G. Wojnicki and the Misses Bienkowka. Instrumental numbers will be played by Mrs. S. Lubienska, Mr. Lande and Dr. M. Janczewski. A monologue, "The Reviewing Stand," will be offered by Mr. Tobinski. Music will be supplied by Hensl's orchestra. Tickets are thirty-five and fifty cents. The public is urged to support this noble cause.

    A benefit concert, play and dance, sponsored by the Welfare Committee of the Polish National Alliance Societies, is to be given Sunday, January 14, at Schoenhofen's Hall. A variety program ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a, II D 10
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1894
    Polish Activities

    Mr. Erasmus Jerzmanowski, who spent a few days with his friends in Chicago, made his stay here doubly interesting by making another donation for a benevolent purpose. The visitor made a contribution of one hundred dollars to the fund for the proposed Polish hospital, leaving this amount with Reverend A. Nowicki when he left.

    The Polish hospital will be established by the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, and this donation is the best proof that Mr. Jerzmanowski has a true conception of good citizenship. All honor to the noble donor!

    Mr. Erasmus Jerzmanowski, who spent a few days with his friends in Chicago, made his stay here doubly interesting by making another donation for a benevolent purpose. The visitor made ...

    Polish
    II D 3, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 10, 1894
    Polish Activities

    The Welfare Committee of the Polish National Alliance has collected to date $270.01. Of this amount it has spent $148.83 for the relief of the poor. There is still $121.18 in the treasury of the committee.

    The Welfare Committee of the Polish National Alliance has collected to date $270.01. Of this amount it has spent $148.83 for the relief of the poor. There is still $121.18 ...

    Polish
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- January 13, 1894
    (No headline)

    The final report of the executors of the will of Joseph Rosenberg was approved this week. Mr. Rosenberg died in July, 1892, and left an estate of $500,000, of which $80,000 was given to charity. To the Michael Reese Hospital, he left $25,000, and a further sum of $10,000 for a bust of the late Michael Reese.

    The final report of the executors of the will of Joseph Rosenberg was approved this week. Mr. Rosenberg died in July, 1892, and left an estate of $500,000, of which ...

    Jewish
    IV, II D 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 13, 1894
    The Polish-American Press Discusses the Polish Mass Meeting and the Polish League (Editorial)

    Our public is very much interested in the project to hold a Polish mass meeting with a view to establishing a Polish League in America. The Polish press has already voiced its opinion on this matter and, as soon as the project is officially announced, it will devote more time and space to it.

    Since our people at large are quite interested in this project, we will try to get for them the opinions expressed on this matter by our various factions, regardless of whether these opinions are favorable or not. We like to know what the Polish public thinks about this question.

    We are quoting now the opinions expressed so far by several Polish newspapers.

    2

    The opinion of other journals will be published also in our columns as soon as they make them public.

    Gosc (Guest), from Manitowoc, Wisconsin, writes as follows: "If it is customary for us American Poles to observe every national holiday, if we can afford to present a Polish Day at the Chicago Fair, if we can take active part in the Lwow Fair, then would it not be proper to think about honoring the memory of our hero at the one-hundredth anniversary of the year of his patriotic deeds for our motherland? But the question is, "How?"

    "We agree with Dziennik Chicagoski that this anniversary should be honored with deeds rather than with demonstrations. We also agree that to hold a general Polish mass meeting and to create a large patriotic organization, which would unite all large and influential political parties, would be the most proper way of honoring the memory of Kosciusko. We should give this matter careful attention."

    3

    Gosc, after commenting on its friendly attitude toward the proposed organization and mentioning the fights that go on among the factions, continues: "If we desire to honor the memory of Kosciusko properly, let us hold a general mass meeting and create something that may unite and lead us toward the same goal."

    Gosc advises the merging of four organizations into one; this, in our opinion, is impossible. We are positive that the editors of Gosc will abandon this plan as soon as they acquaint themselves with the program of the League.

    As to the necessity of unity and co-operation, Gosc writes: "Polish Day [at the Chicago Fair] has demonstrated that we can co-operate and work in harmony if we desire to do so. The celebration of Polish Day was in the nature of a demonstration; but this time we desire to accomplish a deed, to take a step which could bring us closer to our motherland. Why can't we sacrifice our egoism? Why do we divide ourselves into four parts? We should unite and work 4together for the resurrection of Poland."

    We agree with the opinion expressed by these words. Indeed, they express an aim, the realization of which the League could help accomplish.

    Polak w Ameryce (Pole in America) expresses itself on this question as follows: "Polish newspapers in Chicago have undertaken to arrange a general Polish mass meeting. This is a splendid idea, but at present it would be too expensive and impractical. It should be postponed to some other, more prosperous time."

    Moreover, Polak w Ameryce recommends Buffalo, and not Chicago, as the proper place for holding this mass meeting, basing its preference on the belief that the Chicago Poles want to monopolize the leadership.

    Sztandar (Standard), a new publication issued at Saint Adalbert's parish, has 5published a three-column article on the Polish mass meeting and the League. In this article we read the following paragraph: "In our opinion, a general Polish mass meeting is very important, beneficial, and necessary. A successful mass meeting may awaken in us a desire for action and deeds; consequently, it will stand above parties and factions. Polish organizations may preserve their own individuality, their own viewpoints--which, of course, are almost alike--and yet, in spite of all this, it should be possible for them to find some modus vivendi whereby they all could work side by side, helping one another. And what is more important, delegates of other nationalities, such as Lithuanians or Ruthenians, should attend this mass meeting. All our organizations have only one aim, that is, the liberation of Poland. Lithuanians and Ruthenians have a similar aim. We are not so much concerned about the aim as we are about the means; if all of us modify our views a little for the benefit of others, then the means will undoubtedly be found. All we need is more good will and less egoism, for the latter, in some measure, was responsible for the downfall of Poland.

    6

    "Our enemies have always said that the personal ambitions of our ancestors destroyed Poland. Let us give them an opportunity in a very near future to see that the same Poland has been resurrected by her later generations. However, we cannot undertake any action in this direction until we understand ourselves."

    Furthermore, Sztandar is not in favor of any delay on account of the European situation and engages, in a controversy with Polak w Ameryce as to the place where the mass meeting should be held. Sztandar favors Chicago and supports the cause.

    The anarchistic journal Nowezycie (New Life) also mentions the mass meeting and the League. Its remarks, of course, are uncomplimentary. Like Polak w Ameryce, it desires to have the mass meeting in Buffalo, "where the influence of the Chicago leaders would be limited". And even this opinion is surprising, 7coming as it does from a publication the purpose of which is not to build but to destroy.

    Our public is very much interested in the project to hold a Polish mass meeting with a view to establishing a Polish League in America. The Polish press has already ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II B 2 d 1, III B 3 a, III B 2, III H, I E, III H
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 13, 1894
    Polish Activities Fair for the Benefit of the Polish Hospital Opens Tonight

    A church fair for the benefit of the Polish Hospital will open tonight at the school hall on Bradley Street, under the auspices of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. Single admission tickets will cost ten cents and combination tickets seventy-five cents. There are indications that the fair will be a success in every respect. A great variety of valuable articles and all kinds of goods have been collected and purchased. Polish societies are kindly disposed toward this undertaking, and most probably will lend a helping hand. The public will also support the fair because its purpose is noble.

    The following church societies have promised to take active part in the fair: St. John the Baptist's and St. Stephen's societies will participate on January 20; Holy Trinity Society, on January 21.

    The fair will be arranged and managed by a committee consisting of Reverend Vincent Barzynski, Mr. Francis Wleklinski, A. J. Kowalski, W. Jedrzejak, 2T. Krolik, John Kortas, John Lamczyk, Stanislaus Hoffman, and Doctor Lande.

    [Translator's note: The remainder of the article lists the names of members of various minor committees.]

    A church fair for the benefit of the Polish Hospital will open tonight at the school hall on Bradley Street, under the auspices of the Sisters of the Holy Family ...

    Polish
    II D 3, III C, IV