The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 05, 1893
    Altgeld Improving.

    Governor Altgeld's condition is improving and if he suffers no relapse, he will be able to start his journey to Springfield on Saturday. For the present, however, the doctor's orders are that he refrain from meeting visitors and that he ramain at home in seclusion, home in this instance being the Palmer House. In consideration of these circumstances, the Iroquois Club cancelled its festival which was announced for this evening; it was to be an honorary reception for Altgeld.

    His inauguration proclamation is nearly finished. It will give a detailed account of the fundamentals which Altgeld intends to apply when he is at the helm of the state, particularly matters appertaining to schools, prisons, how to improve roads, what methods to pursue in order to make the State Commissioners really useful to the population at large, whereby their specific usefulness to politicians, will be abridged.

    Governor Altgeld's condition is improving and if he suffers no relapse, he will be able to start his journey to Springfield on Saturday. For the present, however, the doctor's orders ...

    German
    IV, I F 5, I F 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 06, 1893
    An Appropriate Project Congress of Polish Teachers in America (Editorial)

    A very propitious and appropriate project has arisen among the teachers of Polish parochial schools in Chicago. It is a plan to call a Congress of all Polish teachers in America for this year. The object of the Congress, which could best meet in Chicago during this year's vacation period, is to create an understanding between our teachers as to forms and methods of teaching in Polish schools. During the Congress, lectures would be read on pedagogic questions, and experimental lessons performed, which would not be without substantial profit to the members of the Congress in general.

    One result could be the forming of an Association of Polish teachers. It is superfluous to demonstrate here the need for either the Congress or such an association. In the old country, more especially in the provinces of Galicia and Poznan, associations of this sort exist and bring about great gains in public education.

    2

    Congresses called together frequently in various places, are ever more useful; often they constitute a practical school for many teachers, simplify the exchange of views on pedagogic problems, and make for a uniform method of teaching.

    Similar congresses would be of still greater value here in America where we have only a few teachers who have studied pedagogic method, or who have the necessary professional experience. The project is therefore a pertinent one.

    As usual, financial difficulties may stand in the way of its fulfillment. We believe, however, that with honest effort, these barriers will not prove insurmountable. The exposition in Chicago will help to attract some of the teachers during the vacation months, especially those who possess the means and those who live in the vicinity of Chicago.

    3

    To the best of our knowledge, Mr. Sczesny Zahajkiewicz, one of the originators of the plan, intends to raise at least a small fund for this purpose; we have no doubt that his efforts will receive the sincere support of those to whom Polish education lies near to the heart.

    We wish the initiators of this project every success in its accomplishment, and we promise to return to this important matter not once, but many times.

    A very propitious and appropriate project has arisen among the teachers of Polish parochial schools in Chicago. It is a plan to call a Congress of all Polish teachers in ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, III B 4, IV, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1893
    German Democrats Condemn Unconscientious Office Holders.

    The published names of the recently appointed officials, whose jobs have been doled out by the newly elected office holders, brought about a protest meeting at Jung's Hall, at the behest of the German Democrats. The meeting was called by the executives of the German Democratic Central Association, and a large number of German Club delegates as well as German Democrats in general.

    We append the resolutions, which a committee, consisting of H. Lieb, M. Stern, Wm. Reisenegger, F. Demmler, K. Bechstein and M. N. Simon, has drafted in conformity with the wishes of the assembly.

    "The German-American Democrats of Chicago protest against the shameful disregard for the German speaking citizens by those, who were elected with the united help of the German element, and also against the leaders in the last campaign, who promised to consider the German contingent, but broke their pledges in favor of a greedy, office seeking horde. The German-American Club considers the deliberate procedure by which its recommendations were nullified and shelved, to be an absolute disregard of the German people which comprises exactly one third of the voting strength of Cook County, but it also sees therein a definite proof, that 2a more drastic organization and greater aggressiveness by the voters becomes imperative, since their representatives are chosen by non-Germans who have no sympathy or consideration whatsoever for us, and this realization prompts us to admonish all German voters- 'Do your work early in order to attain the achievements to which our Germanity is entitled: equal duties and equal rights:

    "The German-American Democratic Association, also herewith expresses its gratitude to those, whose mental and financial contributions help to improve the political conditions for the German-Americans and who energetically defend these rights.

    "If anyone deserves considerations, then it should be given to the German organizations, who had the hardest and most thankless job in the campaign. They ought to decide who the German representatives shall be in the various administrations and they should not be at the mercy of some Irish alderman who dictates which particular German is eligible. And, is it a disgrace to acquire any public position, important or unimportant?.... General Lieb, (probably spelt Lieb, Transl.) made a very poignant speech about the 'Gang'. 'What we must do in the future', he exclaimed, amidst vociferous approval, 'is to be 3prudent and circumspect at the very beginning. If one of those mayoral or aldermanic candidates comes around, whining for our votes, let us ask him, who is behind you? Who nominated you? If it's the gang - then, rauss mit ihm:' (Throw him out.)"....

    The published names of the recently appointed officials, whose jobs have been doled out by the newly elected office holders, brought about a protest meeting at Jung's Hall, at the ...

    German
    I F 2, I F 3, I F 4, I C, IV
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1893
    Theatrical Society Meeting

    The Theatrical Society will hold its meeting on the 7th of January, Saturday evening at 8 P. M. at the Lietuva editor's office, 567 W. 18th St.

    All friends are cordially invited to come on this meeting as we have many important matters to decide.

    Secretary

    The Theatrical Society will hold its meeting on the 7th of January, Saturday evening at 8 P. M. at the Lietuva editor's office, 567 W. 18th St. All friends are ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 c 1
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1893
    What Detrikent the Cards Bring

    Dear readers, by seeing what spiritual and material detriment the cards bring to our brothers, I decided to write a few words that you may understand about the hellish effect the cards have.

    You will find many homes where they are playing cards, you will find many Lithuanians who lose money by playing cards.

    Let us look into the life of a card-player. We will see what bad effect the cards bring to them.

    They do not sleep in all night, very often they must drink whiskey by force. Lack of sleep endangers man's health, makes him lazy not only in his work but in serving God also.

    Let us look at the gamblers: all of them with their open mouths are waiting to gulp those few cents that are on the table. You can see the grudge-like stamp on their long faces, the greed to get somebody's money. In their greediness for strange money, they forget the nine and also the seven sins.

    When he wins money he is as proud as though he had saved his soul. Then such a gambler with that money is ready to commit any sin.

    This is not all, when the gambler loses his money, then the trouble starts. Very often they fight, suffer severe injuries, then lose their health, in

    Dear readers, by seeing what spiritual and material detriment the cards bring to our brothers, I decided to write a few words that you may understand about the hellish effect ...

    Lithuanian
    I B 1
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1893
    Attention Countrymen! (Calling to Organize a Political Club)

    We ought to get acquainted with political benefits in this country. Brothers, we are calling a meeting on Sunday, January 2nd, 2 P. M. at Z. Rykowas Hall, 4458 S. Wood St., in order to organize a Lithuanian Political Club. At this meeting there will be Lithuanian speakers.

    Committee.

    We ought to get acquainted with political benefits in this country. Brothers, we are calling a meeting on Sunday, January 2nd, 2 P. M. at Z. Rykowas Hall, 4458 S. ...

    Lithuanian
    I F 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 07, 1893
    On the Matter of National Mourning for the Year 1893 (Editorial)

    The question of national mourning, which was so hotly debated last year, has become a matter of fresh interest in Poland and even here in America. It gathered new impetus with the coming of the year 1893, the centenary anniversary of the second Polish partition. Already at the end of last November, the youth from various educational centers of Lwow decided upon a whole year's national mourning, calling for a general cessation of entertainment activities and increased effort in public enlightenment. This initiative, though it came from a source scarcely competent to decide the behavior of a whole adult society, found certain echoes in Galicia. At the same time, a sweeping appeal was addressed to European emigrants to observe mourning by prohibiting entertainment activity, and redoubling efforts for individual and collective advancement. It called also for general organization and for the establishment of a National Fund. Just as last year, opposition to this project arose. In Lwow, the influential association of handicraftsmen, 2"Gwiazda" [Star], declared itself definitely against a whole year's mourning, as did the Businessmen's Association of Lwow. Many newspapers in Poland recognize and support this opposition to the proposed mourning period. It is superfluous to repeat here all the arguments in favor of mourning, and against it. A year ago, this newspaper treated the subject more fully. A year ago too, this newspaper declared itself in favor of mourning--only if all of the Poles agreed to put it into effect. A partisan "mourning", favored by the more fervent elements would only substantiate the fears of those who believe that practical harm will result.

    In Polish-American circles, it is impossible to consider such an observance, in the face of the various party differences and internal dissensions which attack us so pitilessly. In any case, since we cannot observe it any other way, let us demonstrate our mourning by redoubling our national and social work. Let us work for education and for society--and first of all, for the unification of our Polish groups, torn apart today by scandalous quarrels and irrational hatred.

    3

    This will be the best observance of the year 1893!

    The question of national mourning, which was so hotly debated last year, has become a matter of fresh interest in Poland and even here in America. It gathered new impetus ...

    Polish
    V A 1, III H, I C
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1893
    Political Meeting

    The Lithuanian Political Club will hold its meeting on Sunday, January 8, at 3 P. M. at Szimkewiczius Hall, 811 S. Halsted St.

    We are cordially inviting all brothers Lithuanians to come to this meeting because we have a very important matter to decide.

    Secretary

    The Lithuanian Political Club will hold its meeting on Sunday, January 8, at 3 P. M. at Szimkewiczius Hall, 811 S. Halsted St. We are cordially inviting all brothers Lithuanians ...

    Lithuanian
    I F 2
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1893
    Remark

    Countrymen! For better understanding of our national and spiritual enlightenment, I found out that Lithuanians are eager to know about the American Indians and their destroyers in this free land, I decided to write a short story about the American Indians.

    Many a time I asked our brothers, why they are not reading newspapers. Every one answered, there is nothing in the paper about history. Up to this time our newspapers,except Lietuva, did not give to its readers what they demand. In order to give more light to our readers. I decided to translate American history.

    If the readers will like my translated story, I will be satisfied. By reading history the readers will get used to reading the paper, will obtain enlightenment and knowledge, then they will quit card playing and drinking.

    N. F. Martisgauckas

    Countrymen! For better understanding of our national and spiritual enlightenment, I found out that Lithuanians are eager to know about the American Indians and their destroyers in this free land, ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, I C, I A 3, III A, I J
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1893
    Dear Readers: (Editor's Appeal)

    Our newspaper is small, but contains in it lot of truth and justice. We are not praising ourselves, our readers themselves are the judges of the newspaper, what benefit they are getting from it.

    Our purpose is to spread light among our illiterate brothers. We cannot find anything better for our brothers than spreading education among them. Therefore brothers, while you are reading our newspaper, ask your brothers to subscribe to our paper. We believe that you will join us to help our brothers to get education. Old, young, educated and freethinkers will find that education is the source of knowledge.

    Our newspaper is as necessary as the sun's beams to crops. We can compare our newspaper with the rising sun, which gives light and energy to life; in the same way our newspaper is awakening our illiterate brothers from the sleep of darkness.

    Our newspaper is small, but contains in it lot of truth and justice. We are not praising ourselves, our readers themselves are the judges of the newspaper, what benefit they ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, I A 3