The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 26, 1887
    New Cable System

    A new power cable has been invented by a well-known Dane, R. Rasmussen. It has been tried out by the Cable Car Company and found to be a great improvement over the old underground cable.

    This new cable is housed in a "box" on the surface between the rails, thus facilitating the repairing of the cable in case of a break.

    Several other improvements over the old system are to be found, among them being better control of speed, easier stopping, less wear and tear, and higher degree of safety.

    No doubt this new cable will soon be in use throughout Chicago.

    A new power cable has been invented by a well-known Dane, R. Rasmussen. It has been tried out by the Cable Car Company and found to be a great improvement ...

    Danish
    II A 2, IV
  • Zgoda -- January 26, 1887
    Slander

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land.

    Not long ago something was said in regard to the above mentioned which caused hard feelings and misunderstanding among Polish people; we feel that it should be overlooked.

    American citizens attending the Polish National Alliance convention began collecting donations to support and maintain the academy and convent of the Ursulan Sisters. Donations were given good-heartedly.

    During a church mission in a small town near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a Polish Catholic priest, Father Koluszewski of Cleveland, ascended the pulpit and denounced sternly the donations given to support the "n Home."

    2

    "Who gave them permission," said the Reverend Father to the congregation, "to take care of the collections for the Ursulans? Do not believe them; they are liars, these Ursulans; they are a suspicious group of ladies. In the old country the devil sent women to do his bidding where he himself had failed."

    I will not say anything that you can hold against me but I will add this - that the reason for the sudden anger of Reverend Father Koluszewski against the Ursulans is that the Polish National Alliance of America is taking care of the donations for the Ursulans and is being fully supported by its 3,000 members and by different societies and Catholic institutions.

    Reverend Father Koluszewski is himself working against the Polish National Alliance; he cannot understand how an organization as big as the P. N. A. can undertake so great a responsibility and still have so many Roman Catholic priests striving for an opportunity to join it.

    Reverend Koluszewski's speech from the pulpit only caused the people to 3leave in great anger; it caused ill feeling among the P. N. A. members because they were willing to contribute to the support of poor Ursulan Sisters' Convent.

    Another priest said: "As a priest, I am humiliated at the sudden outburst of Reverend Father Koluszerski; as a Pole, I cannot find words to apoligize for his behavior. I know that from our native country the poorest class of people crossed the ocean in search of a country where they could be taken care of in their old age, as for example, the Home of the Ursulan Sisters. This institution is also striving to save our children from the shame put upon their souls because of the lack of education. They are working to teach our Polish children the success and pleasures of life received from having a good education and from the teachings of the Catholic religion.

    It also shows in old records that the head of this institution, Superior Sister Morawska, donated her farm and all her money in her home town of Poland for the building of this home, Ursulan Sisters. This shows that any propaganda or slander said against these "Sisters" is only used as an obstruction against the Polish people in their effort to advance and their 4undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Almighty God will punish the trouble-maker who spoke so rudely about the Ursulan Sisters and their undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Dr. Rev. Father Kanonik.

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land. Not long ago something was ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c, III B 4, I K, III B 2, II D 5, I A 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1887
    Not One German Among Them

    During the last 8 months, we German-Americans had to hear repeatedly, that hardly without exception the sentenced Anarchists were all Germans. To be correct, only 5 of the sentenced men were born in Germany, 2 are natives of America and 1 is an English subject. But of what nationality were the feminine admirers of the sentenced anarchists, to whose trials they have run day after day? To what nationality did these women belong, who before and after the sentence was passed, visited the condemned men all too often, turning their heads with flattery? Among these women never a German was seen, unless it was a close relative of the accused men and then her behavior was always dignified. These women who found pleasure in visiting the jail and its occupants, are members of the so-called better class of English-Americans. Spies of course was the involuntary center of their interest. The fact that 6 of the condemned men are married was a little barrier, and they were left alone by the half crazy women folk.

    Lingg, the youthful dynamite bomb manufacturer is a single man and in addition 2a much handsomer man than Spies. He is also considered a much more interesting man, for he resisted his arrest most vigorously. But Lingg's expression is sulky, his manners reserved and he showed himself not at all in favor of feminine visitors. As a matter of fact, it is not at all necessary for a sentenced man to be handsome, in order to become a darling of "ladies" of that caliber. This shows the case of murderer Mulkowsky clearly. That he did not become engaged to marry one of the fair sex was probably due to the fact, that his lawyer was not a match-maker. Not one woman present at court preceedings or a visitor to the jail, was German, for the German women still believe in decency. In German families the daughter does not rule her parents; the father is not the "old man" or the mother the "old woman" relinguishing the rule of the house in favor of the daughter. They have and continue to be the bosses in their own home. This is of course, the result of sane rearing of German girls, who don't allow themselves to become sickly sentimental or oppose custom and decency.

    During the last 8 months, we German-Americans had to hear repeatedly, that hardly without exception the sentenced Anarchists were all Germans. To be correct, only 5 of the sentenced men ...

    German
    I E, I B 3 b, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 29, 1887
    Election Rights for Women

    The Federal Senate has voted against the bill, which was to entitle every women reaching the age of maturity to cast her vote. Among the minority (23 men) in favor of the bill was the new Senator of Illinois, Mr. Chas B. Farwell... Women anxious to participate in political activities may be numerous, but they were doubtlessly gifted with a good mouthpiece, which explains of course, why "Statesmen" like these are in favor of women in politics. These Statesmen have to resort even to such tactics, in order to strengthen their position. According to Cady-Stanton, Susan Anthony and others, the principal reason for introducing women into politics is, that women would have an ennobling and moralizing influence upon politics. This is one of the silly phrases for which people,who preferably let others think for them, would fall, without questioning the other side of it.

    It is quite surprising that an English-American paper(The Local Daily News) has the courage to point out the reverse when it says: "The women who have a beneficent influence on social life, are not the same women who demand the 2right to vote... Very much is said about the charitable and noble influence of good women, while it is entirely overlooked what the influence of the low and indecent woman can be. What would be the result, if women of Chicago would obtain the vote? Would the virtuous and noble, highly educated women, or the morally low, heartless, and uncultured woman make use of this privilege?

    We hear so much about liquor taverns at times of elections; but the influence of occupants of houses of ill-fame is still worse. The franchise would never be exercised by the decent women, who never yearned for it, but by 7000-8000 indecent, immoral and uneducated women. What if these women, like those 8000 mentioned in Chicago, 10,000 in Philadelphia and 16,000 in New York, altogether about 120,000 throughout the United States would take part in elections? Of their influence would have to be reckoned with in nominating candidates? The election turmoil which is now carried from tavern to tavern would then be carried from one house of ill-fame to the other. The election day would furnish us with scenes of indecency never seen before. The decent and modest woman would not 3venture to rub elbows with this element and therefore would abstain from voting...the shame and disgrace brought on the country by the women suffrage, would be fatal to the country."

    It rarely happens, that an English-American newspaper goes as far as taking a stand against the "ladies" and telling them frankly the truth. We fully agree with the attitude of the news, for every word this article contains, breathes pure truth... No matter what changes the 20th century may bring, general suffrage for women at least will not become constitutional during the 19th century.

    The Federal Senate has voted against the bill, which was to entitle every women reaching the age of maturity to cast her vote. Among the minority (23 men) in favor ...

    German
    I K, I B 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 02, 1887
    Mrs. Nina Spies

    Nina Van Zandt, the mad bride of an anarchist was successful at last to become last Sunday evening the lawful wife of August Spies by proxy. The "dignified" ceremony was performed by the anarchistic sympathizer Judge Engelhardt, at which Henry W. Spies acted as proxy for August Spies, his brother.

    The proceedings of this pretty "business," which were so successfully kept a secret, were the following: When Sheriff Matson opposed and rendered such ceremony impossible at the county jail, Nina remembered the words uttered by Mr. Matson, stressing emphatically that only the wife or blood relatives are permitted to visit the condemned men, and knowing also that a marriage by proxy is legal and fully recognized, she won Judge Engelhardt of Jefferson, the friend of anarchists, to solemnize her marriage to August Spies, through his representative.

    2

    Saturday last, August Spies authorized his brother, Henry W. , to represent him at the ceremony, which took place at Judge Engelhardt's home in the presence of the bride's parents, the mother of August Spies, and his sister, Gretchen and brother, Ferdinand. All those present at the wedding promised to keep the ceremony secret. Although there is much rejoicing in the families of Spies and Van Zandt and, of course, of the newly weds, about the trick they played on the sheriff, many of the friends and sympathizers of the anarchists are provoked that their "comrade", August Spies, consented to an extraordinary marriage of this type.

    Leonard Sweet, the attorney recently acquired for the anarchists, is said to have expressed himself, that the union of Spies and Miss Van Zandt was not legal. If this wedding story is true, it proves anew that August Spies, who so frequently denounced a wedding ceremony as something ridiculous, in the anarchistic organ, has lost all sense of shame and honor, else he could not have suffered, that a man-crazy, but otherwise respectable, girl would throw her fate together with his.

    Nina Van Zandt, the mad bride of an anarchist was successful at last to become last Sunday evening the lawful wife of August Spies by proxy. The "dignified" ceremony was ...

    German
    I E, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 04, 1887
    In a New Part.

    If there are people still who believe in Nina Van Zandt's sanity, they will change their minds when the report reaches them that she is the author and publisher of a book glorifying her "worthy husband" August Spies. To convince the readers that they do not miss much if they don't purchase the first product of this writer, we are giving here the contents of the book.

    First, of course, the title of the book which is: A. Spies' Autobiography; his speech in the court room; notes, letters etc. The book cover bears, of course, the name of Nina Van Zandt, the publisher. Not to forget, a new book must have a "preface" also. Nina explains in this preface her reason for publishing the biography and defense speech of A. Spies; also letters written by Spies while in jail and sent to her.

    2

    The intention is to acquaint her American fellow-citizens with the life, character, and efforts of the one who has been and still is misjudged and who is the victim of a conspiracy of social hawks. Contrary to press reports, she found the accused anarchists to be intelligent men and, being convinced that the police and detective force are trying their best to have the accused condemned, she determined to stand up for the persecuted men.

    Upon her and other friends advice, August Spies expanded his autobiography and consented to its publication..........Quite indignantly, she criticises the conduct of newspaper representatives who called her marriage "scandalous", being an American girl and of respectable "extraction". She says: "Had I married an old decrepit invalid with a large fortune, these "ethical" gentlemen who chose to attack me thus, would have had only high praise for me and many of my Christian sisters and brothers

    If there are people still who believe in Nina Van Zandt's sanity, they will change their minds when the report reaches them that she is the author and publisher of ...

    German
    I E, IV
  • Skandinaven -- February 05, 1887
    Miss Van Zandt and Mr. Spies

    Miss Van Zandt and August Spies were married by proxy a few days ago.

    We are absolutely against anything of this kind. If people are allowed to marry by proxy, we will find that the number of bigamists will increase.

    Why were Miss Van Zandt and Mr. Spies permitted to marry at all? The churches and ministers should object to this.

    Miss Van Zandt and August Spies were married by proxy a few days ago. We are absolutely against anything of this kind. If people are allowed to marry by proxy, ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- February 05, 1887
    The Knights of Labor [Forge Ahead]

    The Knights of Labor warned Mayor Harrison that if he did not pass [sic] ordinances in favor of labor he would be defeated in the next election.

    The Knights are becoming more and more militant. They seem to grow stronger and stronger. They have now more than five thousand assemblies throughout the country, and are organizing additional assemblies right along. There is no doubt but they will be a factor in the next national election, especially if they indorse the new National Labor party.

    The Knights of Labor warned Mayor Harrison that if he did not pass [sic] ordinances in favor of labor he would be defeated in the next election. The Knights are ...

    Norwegian
    I D 2 a 3, I F 2, I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 07, 1887
    F. W. Kurtz

    The deceased was a distinguished member of the Masons, a comrade of the veterans of the United States Grant Post and an active member of several German societies. He was born in the Grand-duchy of Hessen, May 16, 1841, and came to America in 1852, settling in Connecticut where he attended the public schools.

    At the outbreak of war he joined the 14th Connecticut Infantry Regiment, which was then assigned to the Potomac army. He took an active part throughout the campaign, fighting in several battles. After his release from the army in 1865, he came West, and married Mary P. Taylor of Hartford, Wisconsin, choosing Chicago as his future home, where he founded an iron foundry.

    The deceased was a distinguished member of the Masons, a comrade of the veterans of the United States Grant Post and an active member of several German societies. He was ...

    German
    IV, III D, II A 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- February 16, 1887
    An Enthusiastic Meeting at the Vorwarts Turner Hall.

    The Turner Hall was crowded to its capacity last night, the audience evidently much interested in the announced order of the day: "Fusion or independent labor policy?"

    Mr. Altpeter was unanimously elected president of the meeting and was received when he stepped on to the platform with loud applause. Mr. Georg Rohrbach was elected secretary.

    The first of the evening's speakers was Mr. Jacob Winnen who gave a short sketch of the development of the new Labor Party. The speaker pointed out, that through technical development the working man loses ground, and as self preservation is the first law of nature, he tries to protect himself against complete enslavement and poverty. The happenings of May 4th, 1886 gave us an idea what organized labor has to expect if it would protest against the permanent oppression, and the cheating through the capitalistic oppressors. It was an eye opener for our citizens and working men toward a subsequent breaking away and severing the ties with the old parties and rely more in its own strength. Mr. Winnen encouraged the pursuance 2of the course taken and expressed hopes that the result of the coming elections will overshadow last fall's elections.

    Secretary Rohrbach then read the following resolution: "In consideration, that the U. L. P. has announced in its first public platform that labor can not expect fair play, either from the Republican nor from the Democratic party and furthermore, that corruption dominates both parties which are entirely under the control of organized capital,and considering that the U. L. P. announced also that capitalistic societies no longer employ ordinary ways to further their interests but take refuge in secret political machinery and thus showed labor that unity means strength, and considering that the U. L. P. declared the necessity of labor organizations to follow the example set by capitalists and become politically independent, and this can be only achieved by means of unity. Only then could labor hope for a just share of the profits which is the fruit of its work, and which was denied him by the Republicans as well as by the Democrats; and considering that the U. L. P. severed herewith the ties with all of the existing political parties declared itself absolutely independent with only one aim, to further such principles of righteousness which the party will conscientiously introduce. And considering that 25,000 citizens voiced their desire for an independent political party, it was decided at this great meeting of Chicago's independent citizens, that the new organization 3continues its activities for the benefit of the working men.

    It has also been decided that the organization will work toward one goal, the election of renowned labor representatives, who will win the nomination from representatives of the U. L. P. Our work will not be finished before righteous ness will be restored to human society."

    This resolution was passed unanimously.

    The Turner Hall was crowded to its capacity last night, the audience evidently much interested in the announced order of the day: "Fusion or independent labor policy?" Mr. Altpeter was ...

    German
    I E