The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 24, 1872
    [The German Aid Society]

    The German Aid Society had about exhausted its means and was forced in the last session of its executive to give and in future only in cases of sickness. Yesterday the Society however had the great satisfaction to receive $1000.00. Mr. F. Madlener, 62 W. Lake Street, whose shop is so close to headquarters that he can see daily the misery, and Mrs. Bernauer, the owner of the house of the headquarters of the Society, each gave $500.00 spontaneously.

    The gift of Mrs. Bernauer is all the more impressive as she already had distributed $1200.00 directly to the fire victims.

    The German Aid Society had about exhausted its means and was forced in the last session of its executive to give and in future only in cases of sickness. Yesterday ...

    German
    II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 25, 1872
    [A New Member of Our Editorial Staff]

    Rev. Wilhelm Rapp has given up the editorship of the Baltimore Wecker on January, in order to enter the editorship staff of the Illinois Staats Zeitung. He moves with his family to Chicago and as soon as he is somewhat settled here, he will start in his new activity. We don't need to tell our readers how much we welcome the collaboration of so well-proven and able a man, and how much we missed him in the first three months after the fire.

    To especially introduce Wilhelm Rapp to the German public of Chicago is not necessary, because they still will remember him from earlier days as a tireless fighter for the maintenance of justified peculiarities of the German people in Chicago.

    Rev. Wilhelm Rapp has given up the editorship of the Baltimore Wecker on January, in order to enter the editorship staff of the Illinois Staats Zeitung. He moves with his ...

    German
    II B 2 d 1, IV, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 27, 1872
    "Liberal Knownothings."

    The Cincinnati Volsfreund congratulates the German citizens of Chicago upon the defeat of Mr. Medill's Fire Ordinance and the discomfiture of the nativistic bullies of Tribune, Times and Journal. The paper adds: " The friendly memory of the nativistic infamy will remain, and is going to re-awaken now and then in future, when certain politicians will turn for support to their honored friends of German descent.

    The Volksfreund is right. It is in Chicago political circles no secret, that Horace White and W. F. Storey have merely used the agitation about the Fire Ordinance in order to break the power of the German voters, and so to throw the congressional election to a "liberal" Free Trade candidate White and Storey seek revenge for the defeat they suffered-primarily due to the Illinois Staats Zeitung with the election of Farwell in 1870. For this reason they now wanted to make the Germans the butt of general indignation by depicting them as a gang of rebels and by bringing, if possible,(if they had found in the Grand Jury enough scoundrels of their own stripe) the editor of the Illinois Staats Zeitung on the defendant's bench. Had they been successful they would have re-awakened 2completely the benighted spirit of knownothingism...and would have started a new "citizens" movement...

    Something like that is certain to be tried out, because while the hope of the noble brothers White and Storey who are worthy of each other, has become very feeble, they intend at least to conquer Chicago and Cook County for themselves. Of course, this is possible only, if they succeed in rendering impotent the German vote. The attempt to effect this by preventing the reconstruction of the German district of North Chicago has failed.

    Now another means is to be used; dividing the Germans by creation of a scandal sheet that supposedly is to represent, the decent part of the Germans, but that in fact will represent nobody but a small clique of hungry(and especially thirsty)literary bums, who make of themselves serviceable Moors of the crafty "liberal" Knownothing gang", and who will be dealt with as summarily as other Moors as soon as they have done their duty.

    The Cincinnati Volsfreund congratulates the German citizens of Chicago upon the defeat of Mr. Medill's Fire Ordinance and the discomfiture of the nativistic bullies of Tribune, Times and Journal. The ...

    German
    I F 3, II B 2 d 1, I F 4
  • [Association documents] -- January 28, 1872
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    A communication of U. (nited) H. (ebrew) R. (elief) A. (ssociation) was received and placed on file. It was moved and seconded that the secretary issue an order to U. H. R. A. for each paying member, one dollar.

    A communication of U. (nited) H. (ebrew) R. (elief) A. (ssociation) was received and placed on file. It was moved and seconded that the secretary issue an order to U. ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 29, 1872
    [The Chicago Fire and Prevention of its Recurrence]

    In spite of the truly Liberian cold the mass meeting that the Chicago Workers Association had called for yesterday afternoon was pretty well attended. Mr. Louis Schwuchow, president of the Chicago Workers Association, opened the meeting. Dr. Ernst Schmidt was elected chairman, and Joseph Grunhut of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, secretary.

    Dr. Schmidt said, "As President of this meeting, I will take the floor first and express my convictions without considering whether they correspond to those held by the organizers of this meeting or not. One of the aims of this meeting is that Germans from other parts of the city shall approve what the North Side did in two previous meetings and in their demonstration. We are asked to indorse everything that happened. I, for my part, cannot do so.

    2

    "I believe it would have been better for the good cause if the mass demonstration had not taken place. A procession by night can become dangerous, even if it is started by the best and most dependable elements. One cannot be responsible for all who run along; one cannot get at the rabble that uses the occasion for brawls, riots endexcesses. What young street Arabs do is attributed to decent quiet citizens. The biliousness of the Americans, aroused by their prejudiced newspapers, was ridiculous and absolutely unjustified. Instead of a mass demonstration, competition with thousands of signatures should have been organized. Effective speakers should have given the City Council " a piece of their mind" and explained to them the point of view of the masses.

    "I do not approve of a mass riot as a means to influence the City Council. If every party would do the same, would march with heterogeneous, masses to the City Hall and push its way into the Council Chamber, the situation 3might become very dangerous. Such a procedure is very questionable and should not be taken too lightly. However, it has now happened, and in the future an equally effective way can be used that will be innocuous.

    "I am opposed to the new presented Fire Ordinance that the City Council plans to pass. It has become very one-sided, and therefore quite unsatisfactory. Why should one side of a street have to be built fire-proof, while on the other side and across the alley tinder boxes of any height may be erected? I think to lay the limits along streets is non-sensical. A law suit on the basis of this paragraph a very able attorney told me, would be decided against the city. The "gussets" that according to the present fire ordinance one will permit at several points, I think most dangerous. At the first big fire that the wind kindles and carries further we will have another conflagration in Chicago as we did have it, if built in the same "fire-proof" as before.

    4

    "One might question if the City Council cares at all whether the working people have the means to erect brick buildings or even pay rent for such costly buildings. On valuable plots in the business district low wooden houses won't be built in any case, because it would not pay, and to force owners of cheap plots to build comparatively expensive brick building on them, is very oppressive. A quiet objective deliberation seems now to have become impossible, thanks to the newspaper campaigns and the split in the City Council. All that we can hope to attain now is to narrow as much as possible the fire limits. The North Side has made its will prevail, but the West and South Sides are greatly injured. Whole districts there will remain unbuilt, because the means are lacking for stone buildings, and the construction of wooden houses is to be forbidden.

    5

    "Where is there justice? The inhabitants of the West and south sides in very many cases are in just as difficult a situation as those of the North Side. There plots are to remain empty, new low wooden structures are to be prohibited, but the old rotten barracks may remain till they fall to pieces or burn. The Building Board act arbitrarily, capriciously and confusedly if not actually corruptly. I could have give dozens of examples. A German has little to hope from this Building Board. The fire limits should be decided according to the real value of the real estate, and should be self-regulatory. Hasty ordinances harm the worker, without finally profiting the rich man, if they don't remain dead letters altogether.

    6

    "A written petition to the City Council could still save quite a few districts of the South and West Sides for cheap homesteads for the workers. The tension between Americans and Germans must disappear. On both sides mistakes are being made. The discussion of this question has to be continued.

    "The American press has contemptuously look down upon the German protest, and has decried the mass movement against the original fire ordinance of Medill's as a Communistic riot. They don't know what they are doing. How can one present such a justified demand of the people as a crime?

    "I regret that in the German press, the word Communist has been used as an abusive term. By heaping abuse nothing can be proven; in any case nothing against the principle of that movement.

    7

    "The social development is not at its end. It is an empty illusion to believe that the gross contrasts between rich and poor can exist permanently. The day will come, when the social question will be handled by the masses in a more sensible fashion, and the inequality before law and justice will be done away with; when the name "Communist" will cease to be a term of opprobrium. I always have fought for common law, for equal law, and I am still doing so in my old age."

    The next speech was made by Mr. Wilhelm Rapp, who said, "My friends, I think nobody will expect me to enter upon details of the question you are discussing, as I have been back only two days in my old home-town. Since the great catastrophe it has been tried to take away by decree Chicago's cosmopolitan character. Nativistic tendencies have bared the poison fangs.

    8

    "The German, by nature, is cosmopolitan, very likely to get peaceably along with others, very indulgent of their pretensions.

    "Chicago owes its political and social character to its cosmopolitan working class, that here feels contented. The German worker really represents the true all-American working class. The Germans have defended, as against the greedy land monopoly, the rights of the free working class and have prevented the big money-bags from gobbling up the plots of the laboring people and from bringing the worker into the same dependent position as in the big cities of Europe and, in part, in the East of the United States.

    9

    "In marching ahead in cool determination, you, my friends, are the recognized and honored champions of freedom and of right generally and of the freedom and the right of the worker and the middle classes in particular.

    "To the fire limit question as understood in the East; I saw in Baltimore Germans and Americans, who rejoiced when the news came that the Germans of the North Side had been victorious over the nativists."

    Mr. Vocke's speech we will print tomorrow. A resolutions committee was named, consisting of Dr. Schmidt, Wilhelm Rapp and Wilhelm Vocke. Its propositions were unanimously adopted. Their text:

    10

    "Resolved that we completely approve the measures taken by the Germans of the North Side against the original fire limit ordinance that comprised the whole city and that we endorse in every respect the actions taken by the Mr. A. C. Hesing.

    "Resolved that we demand of the City Council that it does justice to the interests of the small plot owners, both in respect to rebuilding of their habitations and the new construction that has become necessary for the growing laboring population of Chicago in all parts of the city.

    "Resolved, finally, that we will collaborate in pursuit of these principles with all our fellow citizens no matter where they have been born."

    In spite of the truly Liberian cold the mass meeting that the Chicago Workers Association had called for yesterday afternoon was pretty well attended. Mr. Louis Schwuchow, president of the ...

    German
    I F 3, I F 4, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 29, 1872
    ["The Better Classes"]

    An ugly and very un-American phrase has for some time recurred frequently in the Anglo-American papers, the phrase the "better classes."

    What such papers as the Tribune, Times and Evening Journal understand by the "better classes", or the "respectable tax payers" is nothing else but largely the native capitalists ("Geldmenschen"O who have become rich less through productive labor than through "Schacher", and frequently through the most odoriferous speculations... In a court in London a witness once was asked what he meant by the term "gentleman." His answer was:" a man who maintains a carriage and horses." That about corresponds to the sense in which our English papers speak of the "better classes." Only that here something more than coach and horses is needed for respectability. One also needs for it a beautiful house in the Southern part of Michigan or Wabash Avenue, in Calumet, Prairie or Kankakee Avenue; and one needs for it fine clothes, diamonds, and an expensive seat in a fashionable church. He who has all that is a highly respectable "gentleman" even if he has made his money by renting houses for brothels. Because in this respect our" high-minded" Republicans hold it with the Emperor Vespasian who cold-bloodedly said about money tainted with blood and sweat: "Non olet"-Money carries no smell...

    2

    When a small clique of money bags who are just making ready to hoodwink the government and to sell to it a plot for $600,000.00 for which they earlier tried in vain to get $450,000.00- when such a clique decides to forbid to thousands of poor plot-owners to build such houses as they could pay- that is to say to steal from them half of what they have- then papers like the Tribune, and Times assure us that the "better classes" i. e. the people, are agreed, and that all those who object are wretches, brawlers, bums, demagogues and the rabble who must be put down by force of arms or through the law courts. As, in order to equal fully their European prototypes they seek help from the clergy to browbeat the "rabble" that dares to resist the "better classes."

    The use of the word "better classes", in the sense in which it is being used by our American newspapers, is a far more serious insult against the American Republic than the display in a procession of a black-red-golden or a black-red-white (sic!) flag can possibly be. Because this flag indicates only a community of race or language- that nefarious word on the other hand announces the existence of Junkerish appetites of a type much more repulsive than those of the Prussian Junkers because they spring not from an imagined superiority of birth, but from basest money pride.

    An ugly and very un-American phrase has for some time recurred frequently in the Anglo-American papers, the phrase the "better classes." What such papers as the Tribune, Times and Evening ...

    German
    I D 1 a, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 31, 1872
    Johann Georg Gindele

    Quite unexpectedly Chicago lost, yesterday, one of its best and most favored German citizens, namely, Mr. J. G. Gindele. He was born on January 30, 1814, in Ravenburg, Wurttemburg. After a good deal of schooling he went, still an adolescent, to Lindau, near Lake Constance, then to Munich where he worked hard during the Summer, both to support his mother, brothers, and sisters and to save his money in order to attend during the Winter the Polytechnic and other schools. With an iron will he trained himself as an architect and civil engineer. In his twenty-first year he had already made such progress in his profession that he was charged with the construction of a colonnaded hall (the Kurbans) in Kissingen and a bridge at the same place.

    In 1839, he became public building commissioner in Schweinfurth, Bavaria; he remained there eleven years and left lasting memorials to his name- especially a cotton mill, the municipal hospital, and his generally admired water works and water power development on the Main river.

    2

    Because he participated in the movement of 1848-49, so much trouble was made for him that he had to leave Germany. Yet it must be said in honor to his Schweinfurth fellow citizens that they showed long afterwards their close friendship for their Building Commissioner Gindele. In the sixties while he was overcrowded with work as president of the Chicago Board of Public Works, the City of Schweinfurth consulted him officially about various water works, and he elaborated a detailed plan for it.

    In the United States, we find him first in 1850 in Milwaukee. Not finding anything there he went to Port Washington, Wisconsin, sharing with others in a steam mill. In a conflagration he lost everything he possessed.

    In 1852 he was a stone-cutter in Milwaukee, but again had no success. So, finally, after six months he moved to Chicago. Here he became first a common laborer in the Illinois Stone Dressing Company; soon, however, he rose to become superintendent of this firm. And, by and by, he also won an enviable reputation as an architect.

    3

    So it happened that in 1861 he was elected to the Board of Public Works. And as he was reelected after four years, he belonged to it altogether almost eight years (up to his resignation in 1868), and for four or five years he was its president.

    Among the greater buildings in which he participated is the first part of Chicago University in Cottage Grove. This important building was not touched by the Chicago Fire. As president of the Board of Public Works he was one of the supervisors of the construction of the tunnel under Lake Michigan - that by-now world famed water system that provides Chicago with the best drinking water. Entirely according to his plan was built the first tunnel under the Chicago River. It was the tunnel of Washington street that was to form a closer connection between the West and South Sides; and the newer tunnel of La Salle street, to connect the South and North Sides has followed the model.

    4

    In 1869, we find Gindele as one of the Canal Commissioners nominated by the governor, hard at work on planning the correction of the Illinois River in order to clean up the Chicago River, Gindele developed an ingenious plan that since has become a reality.

    In the Fall of 1869 he was elected County Clerk, an office he held up to his death, and ceased his brilliant technical activity. However, he took it up again, in spite of his official duties, after the Great Fire, and took over the leadership of the stone-cutting firm of his four sons. He participated in the reconstruction of the big building of the Chicago Tribune as well as of the McCormick business buildings.

    During the Civil War he shared with passion in the political activities of the Chicago Germans. Later he became on of the founders and early presidents of the singing society, Concordia. He also presided for a while over the Sharpshooters.

    5

    He leaves four sons, a daughter, and a widow. His first wife preceded him in death by four years.

    (Footnote: The Chicago Tribune on the same day has a rather better written and fuller obituary, without, however, mentioning its own, or the Harvester Company's connection with Gindele.)

    Quite unexpectedly Chicago lost, yesterday, one of its best and most favored German citizens, namely, Mr. J. G. Gindele. He was born on January 30, 1814, in Ravenburg, Wurttemburg. After ...

    German
    IV, III B 2, II A 1, II A 2, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 31, 1872
    The Chicago Tribune and the German Workers.

    It is not yet a year since Wilburt F. Storey solemnly called Mr. Horace White of the Tribune a "dirty dog" and a "lying scoundrel." We then thought the expression too strong, but we think so no longer... We will leave quite aside those infamous lies about the events of January 15th, once more are repeated in their entire maliciousness... But that also speeches that most unequivocally condemned noisy demonstrations are represented as invitations for revolutionary excesses, that is to say, are converted into their exact opposite; that surpasses even the measure of bare-faced mendacity that one is justified to expect from the Tribune. The speech of the Chairman of the German workers meeting clearly reproved such disorder as is almost inevitable in the course of such demonstrations as that of January 15th, and expressly warned against the continuance of agitation in this form. The Tribune, however, represents him as a ringleader who had tried to organize a new uprising!

    The same infernal malevolence that actuates the native American murder hoodlums in their atrocious crimes against the Chinese - the same blood thirstiness that moved the reprobate Roumanian rabble to fall over the Jews, the "lying 2scoundrel" of the Chicago Tribune harbors against the Germans... He hopes to get things to the point where (as formerly the cry of "Hepp, hepp" was sufficient in Europe to start a Jew hunt) here in Chicago the shout "Dutch, Dutch" will become the signal for arousing the natives against the Germans.

    Well, can he succeed? Not as long as the Germans form a closely knit front, and don't let themselves be split into mutually antagonistic cliques... The hints made in the Tribune and the Journal that soon a German paper is to be published which will represent the "decent" Germans (i. e., the flunkies of Horace White and W. F. Storey) betrays a plot clearly enough. In what way the Tribune and its ilk reward the services of German Moors who undertake to split the German vote could be revealed by Citizen Jensch and Hermann Lieb. They are, after they have served their purpose - thrown away like squeezed out lemons.

    It is questionable if even ten aldermen could be found who would vote for the fire ordinance as Medill demands it (extension of the limit over the whole city). And if Mr. Medill should commit the boundless stupidity of vetoing the fire ordinance that makes Chicago Avenue and Wells Street as fire limits on the North Side, then the old fire limits will remain.

    It is not yet a year since Wilburt F. Storey solemnly called Mr. Horace White of the Tribune a "dirty dog" and a "lying scoundrel." We then thought the expression ...

    German
    I C, I F 3, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 01, 1872
    The German Library Association.

    At the start of the meeting, the secretary, Mr. Carl Proebstring, being absent, Mr. Richard Michaelis was elected temporary secretary. Then the election of a board was undertaken. Mr. Georg Schneider was elected president with fourteen votes, against nine for Claussemius, three for Rosenthal. For vice president Claussemius received nineteen votes, Rosenthal three, Hesing and Grunhut, one each. Mr. Hermann Eschenburg became treasurer, and Justice of the Peace Max Eberhardt, librarian. Mr. Proebstring and Mr. Julius Rosenthal were elected corresponding secretaries.

    2

    The President, Mr. Georg Schneider, gave a short address about the death of Mr. T. G. Gindele. He said, "The Germans of Cook County and the movement for the creation of a German public library have suffered a grievous loss. He has left our association a part of his valuable collection of books.

    "I knew Mr. Gindele since 1851. He was one of the few, who had the courage to start the anti-Slavery Movement. On January 29, 1854, the first meeting against Slavery took place, here in Chicago. It was a German meeting against the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Mr. Gindele belonged to the resolutions committee. The Germans in Chicago were the originators of the political agitation against Slavery."

    At the start of the meeting, the secretary, Mr. Carl Proebstring, being absent, Mr. Richard Michaelis was elected temporary secretary. Then the election of a board was undertaken. Mr. Georg ...

    German
    II B 2 a, II B 2 d 3, III F, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1872
    [The New Fire Ordinance]

    The Fire Ordinance with its seven sections at last, four months after the Great Fire has been printed...

    The Southside by five wards and a part of the 6th ward is inside the fire limits. This certainly goes much too far, and if section I is adopted as it now stands will probably lead to lawsuits... On the other hand the S. W. corner of the 5th and the N. W. corner of the 16th ward, up to now largely inhabited by Americans, remain outside the fire limits of many of the plot-owners. Some of the Aldermen, especially on the Southside are very dissatisfied and have permitted themselves to be understood that they expect the mayor to veto it. Alderman Holden averred that the Legislature would take the fire limit issue in hand, if the Alderman should pass the Ordinance over the veto of the mayor. This threat was received with ridicule.

    There will be many communications made and petitions presented next Monday night; perhaps there will be amendments and substitutes of which nobody so far has thought. The wards that have not yet made any remonstrances have still time till Monday evening.

    The Fire Ordinance with its seven sections at last, four months after the Great Fire has been printed... The Southside by five wards and a part of the 6th ward ...

    German
    I F 3, I C