The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 26, 1871
    [The Affair of January 15]

    The Grand Jury which yesterday ended its activity has not made itself the tool of the malicious venom of the wretched slanderers of Tribune, Times and Evening Journal as these had confidently expected. But neither has it had the courage to boldly state of what no doubt all its members must be convinced. It has heard numerous witnesses about the "uprising" of January 15, and cannot have gained any other conviction that the three papers are guilty-if not before the law, at least before the moral consciousness of every honorable man- of a common crime;- of the crime of having invented, with a turpitude and shamelessness unexampled even in America, an uprising that severely affected the credit of the city.

    Under these circumstances the Grand Jury would have done its duty only if it has pilloried before public opinion the perpetrators of the infamous calumniations, that described Chicago as the place of a "Prussian an uprising" and of "Communistic violence..."

    The Grand Jury which yesterday ended its activity has not made itself the tool of the malicious venom of the wretched slanderers of Tribune, Times and Evening Journal as these ...

    German
    I C, I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 26, 1871
    [The Grand Jury and the Uprising]

    The Grand Jury which yesterday ended its activity has not made itself the tool of the malicious venom of the wretched slanderers of the Tribune, Times and Evening Journal, as these had confidently expected. But neither has it had the courage to boldly state of what no doubt all its members must be convinced. It has heard numerous witnesses about the "uprising" of January 15, and cannot have gained any other conviction that the three papers are guilty, if not before the law, at least before the moral consciousness of every honorable man, of a common crime: of the crime of having invented, with a turpitude and shamelessness unexampled even in America, an uprising that severly affected the credit of the city.

    Under these circumstances the Grand Jury would have done its duty only if it had pilloried before public opinion the perpetrators of the infamous calumiations, that described Chicago as the place of a "Prussian uprising" and of "Communistic violence...."

    The Grand Jury which yesterday ended its activity has not made itself the tool of the malicious venom of the wretched slanderers of the Tribune, Times and Evening Journal, as ...

    German
    I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 27, 1871
    Report on "Der Sociale Arbeiter-Verein Der Westseite"

    This Social Workers Club was founded 1864 with 337 shares at $10.00 each. Possesses their own hall that is much used for dances and shows and a cash surplus of $8,338.00.

    This Social Workers Club was founded 1864 with 337 shares at $10.00 each. Possesses their own hall that is much used for dances and shows and a cash surplus of ...

    German
    III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 27, 1871
    "Neutrality and Cunning" Editorial:

    President reported to have prohibited further sales of arms. One editor sharply attacks Secretary of War Belknap who was asked by the German Envoy, Herr Von Gerolt(at the time when the government decided to sell its superfluous store of arms) to wait till the Prussian government could make a bid for the total amount. Belknap answered that the U. S. government would not sell to any foreign government, but only to citizens of the U. S. without caring what these people would further do with the arms. The editor says that legally Belknap has, of course, been correct, but that the Prussia government, of course, would also have used U. S. citizens as middle-men, and that Mr. Belknap's decision, due to the exact moment at which it came, showed his intention to help France.

    Shame upon such infamous artifices! The next result of it will be that the U. S. loses all ground under her feet in the Alabama case.

    With such a beam in her eye, how can she express judgment over the splinter in England? The German citizens of the U. S. demand no partisanship, no, not even "sympathy", but just an honest and sincere neutrality.

    President reported to have prohibited further sales of arms. One editor sharply attacks Secretary of War Belknap who was asked by the German Envoy, Herr Von Gerolt(at the time when ...

    German
    III B 1, III H, III A, I G, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1871
    [The Abolition of the Income Tax]

    Editorial about the abolition of the income tax. Editor applauds U. S. Senate for having voted 26.25 for the abolition. Reasons: Rich people able to evade it (Officials and employees have to pay it). Only 275,000 people paid the tax in 1870. Obviously, very many people with incomes over $1000 evaded it.

    Income tax has a depressing and demolishing influence, penalizes the spirit of enterprise and industrial success. Its abolition will be of advantage not only for those who had to pay it, but has the whole of the population.

    Editorial about the abolition of the income tax. Editor applauds U. S. Senate for having voted 26.25 for the abolition. Reasons: Rich people able to evade it (Officials and employees ...

    German
    I H, I D 1 a, I D 1 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1871
    [ the Arms Trade with France]

    Editorial page contains reprint of a long speech made in Cincinnati against the arms trade with France, and an address sent by the Germans of Washington, D. C. to the Congress. (The excuse that these arms have been sold to a so-called Republic is all the more untenable as we ourselves have not hesitated to make war against Mexico, even though it was a republic long ago.

    And this has not even prevented us from conquering and annexing a part of that Republic that was more than 50 times as large as Alsace and Lorraine.

    Editorial page contains reprint of a long speech made in Cincinnati against the arms trade with France, and an address sent by the Germans of Washington, D. C. to the ...

    German
    III B 1, I J, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 30, 1871
    [Paris Has Fallen]

    Report on the reception of the news of the fall of Paris and the armistice. Spontaneous victory demonstration at a concert in the Turnhalle. Enthusiasm of which the word enthusiasm is only a weak description.

    Question if bets regarding the fall of Paris should be settled immediately, as if it was permissible to wait for more definite news.

    Report on the reception of the news of the fall of Paris and the armistice. Spontaneous victory demonstration at a concert in the Turnhalle. Enthusiasm of which the word enthusiasm ...

    German
    I G, III B 2, II B 1 a, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 30, 1871
    [Eligibility of Naturalized Foreigners for the Office of President of the U. S.]

    Editorial on a bill introduced by Senator Cates to charge the Constitution so that foreigners will be able to be candidates for the presidency. The Illinois Staats Zeitung supports this motion in the name of political equality "among other things the adoption of the Cates amendment would remedy the disagreeable situation of German parents of precocious children. The children would no longer be able to boast that they can become more than the parents, namely President of the United States."

    Editorial on a bill introduced by Senator Cates to charge the Constitution so that foreigners will be able to be candidates for the presidency. The Illinois Staats Zeitung supports this ...

    German
    III B 1, II B 2 d 1, III A, I C
  • Chicago Times -- January 31, 1871
    To the Editor of the Times

    In view of the conduct of the German population, pending the war between Prussia and France, is the allegiance of the German element worthy of reliance, could it be depended on in case the Emperor of Germany declared war against these states tomorrow? To a close observer of passing events in Europe for the past four months, the emphatic answer would be, "It could not". Again the actions of the Germans, whether on this day in Commemorating the capitulation of Paris with their flags displayed, their martial music and lager beer, would necessarily induce one to ask,"Is Chicago a part of Germany or the United States? To this add the recent protest at Washington signed by 20,000 "Citizens" against the sale of arms to France. Their public demonstrations in several cities of the Union in tones of defiance to our government, and it needs no prophetic vision to see that we have an element in our midst unworthy of reliance in the hour of danger. Sir, with the exception of the Times, the press of this city has maintained a silence unworthy of that great instructor, the lofty mission of the free press in the United States. Shall we get up an address signed by millions of citizens praying 2for the disfranchisement of the dangerous element, or ostracise them to a more congenial latitude, where they may spend the balance of their lives in that slavery they so anxiously quitted?

    Citizen.

    In view of the conduct of the German population, pending the war between Prussia and France, is the allegiance of the German element worthy of reliance, could it be depended ...

    German
    I C, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 31, 1871
    [The Hispano-Americans and the Anglo-Americans]

    Editorial praises highly a proclamation of a San Domingo patriot against annexation by the U. S. (The reprinted proclamation showers abuse on President Grant.) "The Yankee" appears, and justly so, to the neighboring Spanish-American nations as a brutal, arrogant and greedy conqueror. Justly, we say, because Texas and California furnish proof of the inability of the Anglo-Americans to respect the equal right of the Hispano-American individuality. The Americans have treated the Mexican greasers who stayed in those states with contempt and as foreigners with-out rights (in the land of their birth!)

    What advantage have they enjoyed of this "wonderful material progress?" The annexation of San Domingo would advance the U. S. a long way on the road of brutal conquest and dishonest dealing- that road on which it is true, Holland and England traveled to short-lived might and prosperity, but that made their sudden fall from the height appear only all the more humiliating.

    Editorial praises highly a proclamation of a San Domingo patriot against annexation by the U. S. (The reprinted proclamation showers abuse on President Grant.) "The Yankee" appears, and justly so, ...

    German
    I J