The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • The Chicago Times -- December 10, 1872
    [Welsh Language to be Discussed]

    The ladies of the Welsh Congregational Church give an oyster supper this evening in the rooms usually occupied by the Cambrian Literary Society. On this account the regular weekly public meeting of the Society has been postponed until Tuesday evening, the 17th, on which occasion the question, “Is the maintenance of the Welsh language a hindrance to the social advancement of the Welsh people?” will be discussed. The exercises will be varied with music and speeches on various subjects.

    The ladies of the Welsh Congregational Church give an oyster supper this evening in the rooms usually occupied by the Cambrian Literary Society. On this account the regular weekly public ...

    Welsh
    III C, II B 1 d, II B 1 a, II B 2 g
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 29, 1892
    St. David’s Natal Day Celebrated

    p. 3 – The natal day of St. David, the patron saint of Wales, and the first Archbishop of Caerlleon, was religiously celebrated yesterday afternoon at the Cathedral of SS. Peter and Paul. The services were conducted by the Rev. J. Gwynne Jones, Pastor of the Church of the Good Shepherd, and the Cathedral was filled to overflowing with Welsh-speaking people from all sections of the city.

    In the opening service the responses, prayers and lessons were read in pure Keltic by the Rev. Jones, the congregation uniting in singing the popular Welsh hymn, “Bydd Myrdd o Ryffeddodan”.

    A liberal offering was made, which will be used in erecting a memorial in the new church to be built by the congregation of the Church of the Goo Shepherd to commemorate the life work of Dr. Goronwy Owen, a Welsh pastor and professor in William and Mary College, who lived during the eighteenth century.

    p. 3 – The natal day of St. David, the patron saint of Wales, and the first Archbishop of Caerlleon, was religiously celebrated yesterday afternoon at the Cathedral of SS. ...

    Welsh
    III C, IV, II B 1 a, II C
  • Chicago Record -- February 12, 1894
    Modern Church Open Without Creed or Pastor

    p. 5 – The modern church was launched yesterday afternoon at Bricklayers’ Hall. The meeting was announced for three o’clock but a number of persons, including the Rev. Jenkin Lloyd Jones, who was to deliver the address, arrived fifteen to twenty minutes before that time. They found the doors locked and Janitor Collier announced that no one had made arrangements for the hall, and that some on would have to be responsible for the rent before he would open the doors. The Rev. Mr. Jones, in the absence of the committee, volunteered, ad this difficulty was overcome. It was explained that the engaging of the hall had been left to a committee of two and that both gentlemen had been called out of the city.

    While the hall was filling up, L. T. O’Brien went over to the Moody Institute and secured the services of a double male quartet to lead the singing. These gentlemen supposed they were going to attend a revival meeting, and were considerably put out when they learned the character of the work; however, they remained during the service and led the singing.

    2

    There was some disappointment because a larger turnout of the working people was expected. In explanation of the absence of the laborites, Mr. O’Brien said that a number of meetings were being held about the city that had been previously advertised, and which could not be postponed. He said that in the future arrangements would be made so that these meetings should not conflict with those of the Church.

    The Rev. Mr. Jones read Christ’s sermon on the mount and a portion of the 26th Chapter of Matthew, giving the closing scenes in the life of the Savior.

    Plan Of The New Church

    After prayer and a song, Mr. O’Brien addressed the audience. He said it was the intention in founding the modern church to erect a building which would contain in its basement bath-rooms, a gymnasium and a bowling alley. The main floor would be fitted up as a reading a writing room, the tables would be provided for games, etc. On the upper floor would be the auditorium. There would be no pastor, and no collection, and the seats would be free. Meetings would be held each Sunday, and the workers would be give the opportunity of listening to men of all thought. For the present the meetings would be held in Brick 3Layer’s Hall and would alternate with the Trade and Labor assembly, which meets the first and third Sundays of each month. Two weeks hence there will be a discussion between the Rev. Mr. Burch, secretary of the Ministers’ Association, and William C. Pomeroy. It has not yet been decided whether the discussion shall take place in Brick Layers’ Hall or Centenary Church.

    Mr. O’Brien then introduced the Rev. Mr. Jones as the speaker of the day, who took his text from the fortieth verse of the twenty-sixth chapter of Matthew: “What would ye not watch with me one hour?” He said these words were the cry of a soul for sympathy, the groan of the heart for companionship. This cry of the great Teacher in the garden was the wail of the centuries, and was the most fundamental thought of man, the highest privilege of religion to gratify. If he should be the subject of this afternoon’s thought into one word it would be sympathy.

    Great And Prophetic Interest

    The movement to establish a modern church carried with it great and prophetic interest. It indicated that the God of the Old and New Testament still lived. The church should be established on the root of sympathy. In it all prejudices 4should be buried. The road to sympathy was the near dear, holy road of service. The modern church should be the church of the good Samaritan – the good Samaritan brought down to the nineteenth century. The church that did not do anything in this world was not a modern church – not even an antiquity. It was a nuisance and a stumbling block, and should be put out of the way. It brought religion into disrepute.

    The speaker said the possibilities of the new church were almost beyong the power of description. It would make the millionaire and the beggar equal, who have an equal need of God. To fail in such an undertaking, he said, was a greater glory than to succeed with a less worthy object. In conclusion, he said: “Build on honesty, build on helpfulness, and then you build on the everlasting foundation which prophets and saints have laid in all ages.”

    p. 5 – The modern church was launched yesterday afternoon at Bricklayers’ Hall. The meeting was announced for three o’clock but a number of persons, including the Rev. Jenkin Lloyd ...

    Welsh
    III C, I B 4, IV
  • Yr Ymdrechdydd -- August 16, 1894
    Religious Music and Its Influence

    Religious music is found in many forms. For instance, the great oratorio writers, Handel, Hayden, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Parry and others, interest the upper class of people, that have had a degree of musical education that is above the average. I believe the best music for the consecrated Christian is the gospel tune that has life and is more simple, and which carries with it the message of the cross.

    Music and life are very closely related. Music has an influence that cannot be expressed in words. Spiritual music and worship go together. Music that has been composed and arranged by some consecrated person is wonderfully effective and gives the sweetest experience. My idea in writing this, is to encourage our young people to give more attention to religious music, because it will be most important in dispelling the darkness when it comes.

    The protestant church has been falling down on this very important feature, but with indications here and there we see that it has not entirely disappeared from Israel. For this reason, the redeemed of the Lord will come from far 2with Zion’s Hymns. When our churches and church organizations will appreciate Zion’s music, they will see the beautiful Zion is not so now, but once in a while a flash of the beautiful, even in this day, is heard and felt through the influence of music that has been composed and sung by consecrated people, and its influence stretches farther than we can imagine. These are the reasons for what I have said.

    In Sasiwn, Caernarvon, 1884, I will never forget the Rev. Owen Thomas encouraging congregational singing, and he inferred that some day it may take the place of preaching, - they had sung these words.

    The Hill of Calvary will never leave my memory, and the above story is only one of the many to prove the influence of consecrated music on the nations of the world. The worshipful congregational singing is so important that I would like to write more about it, hoping to influence our American young people.

    Religious music is found in many forms. For instance, the great oratorio writers, Handel, Hayden, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Parry and others, interest the upper class of people, that have had a ...

    Welsh
    II B 1 a, III C
  • Chicago Record-Herald -- May 29, 1913
    [Welsh Parishes in Chicago]

    In Chicago there are 4,686 Welshmen with only 1,818 born abroad.

    Three Welsh parishes:

    Hebron Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Church (largest)

    2900 West Adams Street (one English service per month)

    Welsh Presbyterian Church (South Side Church)

    Princeton Avenue and West 44th Street

    Humboldt Park Union Church

    Spaulding Street near North Avenue (non-denominatonal)

    St. David’s day, March 1st is a Welsh festival.

    In Chicago there are 4,686 Welshmen with only 1,818 born abroad. Three Welsh parishes: Hebron Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Church (largest) 2900 West Adams Street (one English service per month) Welsh ...

    Welsh
    III C, III B 3 b, III G
  • [Interview] -- December 02, 1936
    Interview with Mr. John T. Jones: Biography of Mr. John T. Jones

    Was born on a farm, March 26, 1861, Tanygraigwen, Mynytho, Caernarvonshire, Wales. Came to America in 1889 and settled in Chicago. Was field man for J. W. Snyder and Company in the same capacity from 1899 to 1913, and was with the James Shedd and Company in the same capacity from 1913 to 1922. From that time on until 1930 had his own building contractor business. In 1890 he was made Deacon at the Sardis Welsh Congregational Church. Since 1901 he has had the responsibility of supplying the pulpit of the Humboldt Park Welsh Church. His hobby is prose, poetry and music and he had three very good musical selections published to his credit. He has been a continuous contributor to the Drych and Druid for many years. By so doing, he kept the outside world in touch with his people in Chicago.

    He served two terms as president of Madoc Lodge, American True Order of Ivorites. Has served as Treasurer for the Cambrian Benevolent Society. Is a Mason. Married Lizzie Jones of Bethesda, South Wales, in 1891. She passed on to her reward in April, 1913. Four children were born to them. Retired. Home: 1418 North Central Park Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

    Was born on a farm, March 26, 1861, Tanygraigwen, Mynytho, Caernarvonshire, Wales. Came to America in 1889 and settled in Chicago. Was field man for J. W. Snyder and Company ...

    Welsh
    IV, III C, II A 2, II B 1 a
  • Who’s Who in America -- [Unknown date]
    Jenkin Lloyd Jones

    Independent minister. Lecturer. Editor. Born in Cardiganshire County, South Wales, November 4. 1843. Parents moved to Wisconsin when he was an infant. He worked on their farm until 1862. Was private in the 6th Wisconsin Battery, and was three years in the Civil War. Was a graduate of Meadville, Pennsylvania Theological Seminary in 1870. Was pastor of All Souls Church, Janesville, Wisconsin. Was secretary of the Unitarian Conference for nine years. Organized, and was first secretary of, the Unitarian S. S. Society in 1878, and with others established Unity, a weekly paper, a new organ of the Congress of Religions, and has been its editor since 1879.

    Organized, and since 1882 has been pastor of, All Souls Church, Chicago. Secretary of the World’s Parliament of Religions in Illinois. Was its general secretary, and was president of Illinois Sate Conference of Charities. Lecturer in English extension department, University of Chicago. President of Tower Hill Summer School of Literature and Religion. Founder and first president of the Chicago 2Browning Society. Author of The Faith That Makes the Faithful; With William C. Gannett, 1886; Practical Piety, 1890; Word of the Spirit, 1897; Bits of Wayside Gospel, 1899; A Search for an Infidel; Bits of Wayside Gospel, 2nd Series 1901; Nuggets from a Welsh Mine, 1902. Address: 3939 Langley Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

    Independent minister. Lecturer. Editor. Born in Cardiganshire County, South Wales, November 4. 1843. Parents moved to Wisconsin when he was an infant. He worked on their farm until 1862. Was ...

    Welsh
    IV, III C, II B 1 d, II B 2 d 3
  • [Interview] -- [Unknown date]
    Interview with George Williams: Welsh Churches

    There are three Welsh churches in Chicago. Hebron Welsh Presbyterian is the oldest, founded at least thirty-five years ago. The other two are the Humboldt Park and South Side Church.

    These congregations were originally Methodist but some ten years ago voted to become Presbyterian as the American Methodists were not Calvinistic.

    The services in these churches are held in Welsh, with an English service generally once a month.

    There are three Welsh churches in Chicago. Hebron Welsh Presbyterian is the oldest, founded at least thirty-five years ago. The other two are the Humboldt Park and South Side Church. ...

    Welsh
    III C
  • A Brief History of Hebron Presbyterian Church -- [Unknown date]
    [Record of Hebron Presbyterian Church]

    Welsh services were held in Chicago as early as 1844 mainly in private homes.

    In the spring of 1850 a room was rented for services at corner of Randolph and Canal Streets. In 1851 a church was built.

    P. 4 – From ’55 to ’60 the church was kept up mainly by young women in service. After 1864 it could again afford a pastor.

    P. 5 – “The Wisconsin Synod held at Hebron, Wisconsin, October 19-21, 1900, passed a resolution inviting the church to send its pastor to all its churches to plead for financial help”. In 1902 the new church was completed. At the same time Sardis Congregational Church dissolved and join Hebron as did many members of Bethany Welsh M. E. Church.

    P. 6 – In 1909 the mortgage to the church was burned at a public meeting while the Cymric Club finished ice cream and cake.

    2

    P. 12 – A large dish was placed on the pulpit and three widows of former deacons burned three cancelled notes before the congregation.

    Welsh services were held in Chicago as early as 1844 mainly in private homes. In the spring of 1850 a room was rented for services at corner of Randolph and ...

    Welsh
    III C
  • [Interview] -- [Unknown date]
    Interview with George Williams

    Of all the Welsh societies in the city the Cambrian is the oldest. It has a membership of some 2,500, but many of them are inactive.

    Of all the Welsh societies in the city the Cambrian is the oldest. It has a membership of some 2,500, but many of them are inactive.

    Welsh
    II D 1, III C