The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Ukraina -- May 19, 1917
    To Our Readers

    In turning out this first issue of the Ukraina to the Ukrainian people, we put on our program first, the satisfying of the reading public as much as our strength permits; not contradicting the wishes of our people; not dictating to them our own ideas as if these ideas were the "Holy Faith", without asking their approval in the matter; not imposing ourselves upon any party or any religion. We do not pretend to be the "Ukrainian Moses" to lead you. We intend, not to be your director, but to be with you in work, in rebirth, in morality, in progress, in struggles and in gain.

    Looking over the list of the existing newspapers up to date, we find that they all represent some party or sect, and that they all have monopolized already certain branches of the national life, with their program and aspiration for their ideals; that they have crystalized themselves in the motives of the group work. Thus, to our newspaper, there was nothing left except to work in the field which the progressives, parties, and sectarians had left untilled in the struggle for our ideals. This nationalism, although it comes into the program of them all, yet 2when abused or overdone by them the exploitations year after year, cause the real workers to take care of the same.

    This neglected soil is really our Ukrainian nationalism. This truly is our aim and purpose, the ideal of our newspaper. Our work then, is to improve this neglected soil. That is why we turn to all that love to labor in the national field for the amelioration of conditions. We call on all the Ukrainian patriots to come to us with their spiritual and material means. Primarily, we call on all the people to whom we guarantee clean and healthy nationalistic endeavors, without party or religious "isms", quarrels or family fights. We call our poets and young writers who squander their strength and ability in class and religious conflicts, neglecting their God-given creative talent. We call on our artists, painters, and inventors to try their strength on the pages of the Ukraina before they awaken the whole world with their genius. Let them contribute either by pen or by pictures to the beauty of the Ukrainian rebirth.

    We also ask all the other Ukrainian newspapers to meet in friendly spirit as fair-minded people do, because we do not enter into any competition with them nor do we think of spoiling anybody's business.

    3

    We are not going to attack any party, sect, or individual. Our newspaper is not that of any privileged Ukrainian class in America.

    We are publishing the Ukraina for the Ukrainians, in order to uplift to the heights Ukrainian nationalism and all that is closely connected with it. Our greatest ambition in editing our Ukraina is to acquaint the strong countries such as England, America and France, with Ukrainian questions in order to get their support for these problems in their newspapers and offices. Furthermore, to obtain from the Ukrainians the moral and material help, and in a short time to make Ukraina a daily newspaper.

    In turning out this first issue of the Ukraina to the Ukrainian people, we put on our program first, the satisfying of the reading public as much as our strength ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 2 d 1, III H
  • Russkaya Pochta -- June 16, 1917
    The Resolution of the Russian-Ukrainian Mass-Meeting

    On June 3, 1917 a mass-meeting of the Russian-Ukrainians in Chicago took place and the following resolution was made: Taking into consideration the successfully achieved Russian revolution, we Russian and Ukrainian peasants and workers unanimously resolve: 1) The expression of great thanks to all fighters of Russian liberty and the wish of a successful restoration of peace and order in a free country. 2) The expression of full confidence in the provisionary government, insisting on a victorious outcome of the war in order once and for all, to put an end to militarism. 3) To give to all nationalities inhabiting Russia freedom on the basis of autonomy. 4) The confiscation in favor of the people of all the natural riches and a just distribution of such. 5) The return to the parishioners of all Russian church property appropriated by the bishops. 6) The dismissal of all former tsarist officials, consuls and representatives in America and their replacement by representatives of free Russia. 7) The taking of measures against the Russian clergy, which agitates 2against the new people's government and for the restoration of monarchy in Russia. 8) The confiscation in favor of the people all the property received, as a reward for service to the former tsars. 9) Russia should be a democratic republic. 10) The full prohibition of the sale of liquors. 11) The introduction of obligatory general peoples education. 12) The expression of deep thanks to the American Republic, who has taken under its protection all Russians, who suffered from the former tsaristic regime. The present resolution was worked out after a grand manifestation in honor of liberty and unanimously accepted by the Russian-Ukrainian mass-meeting, and it was resolved to send it immediately to the Russian State Duma. Note: This resolution is an expression of the public opinion of the progressive part of the Russian colony in Chicago, which was hostile to the tsaristic regime. In general one could safely say that almost the whole Russian colony at that time was supporting the provisional government of Kerensky, with the exception of a small number of persons, who belonged to different political movements more to the left, than the government of Kerensky. This resolution reflects the frame of mind of the great majority of Russians in Chicago. N. K.)

    On June 3, 1917 a mass-meeting of the Russian-Ukrainians in Chicago took place and the following resolution was made: Taking into consideration the successfully achieved Russian revolution, we Russian and ...

    Ukrainian
    I E, I A 1 a, I B 1, III H, I G
  • Ukraina -- May 16, 1918
    The Political Aspect of the Ukrainians in America

    The misunderstanding between the benefit associations and the political organizations has no perceptible effect upon the attitude of the Ukrainian immigrants. Why? Because the national spirit is too powerful to be touched by these disagreements. It is noteworthy that the great body of Ukrainians is really in accord with the political organizations, as well as, with the benefit associations. This is true because of the strong bond of national unity. Little misunderstandings, unnoticeable friction, in the realm of politics is not only not harmful, but is on the contrary, unavoidable, very beneficial, and necessary to the life of the organizations. The one main ideal is never lost sight of, viz: Freedom for their own nation. These misunderstandings are due to the fact that some do not have sufficient knowledge and understanding of national questions. The shortcoming of this paper Workman could suitably be its chaos.

    In our opinion this newspaper has neither moral nor social influence upon 2national affairs. The Canadian Ranok is a Presbyterian newspaper. We must admit that in the United States of America we have the Ukrainian-American Workman, a social-religious newspaper, whose "knowledge" and revealed truth are supposed to be grounded on revelation, miracles, and, as the National Freedom sarcastically states, on fortune telling.

    The political policy of all our benevolent society organs, is one: against Germany, against Austria, and sympathy with the Allies and the Ukrainian nation. We do not intend to repeat the strong arguments of our worthy newspapers which have so thoroughly discussed this question. We believe there is not a single Ukrainian in the United States or Canada who would have a different attitude; that is, who would not take sides with the Allies, and the Ukrainians, against Germany and Austria.

    It is a fact that there was no special agitation among the Ukrainians for any one political set-up. Again, the orientations as before so now, is not 3an artificial outcome of a certain political or benefit association. Slight differences in our orientation have occurred as if by means of some unseen force during the last four years. These truths can not be denied by anyone. These are facts and need no further proofs. Yet it would be interesting to explain them.

    First: Why are benefit associations which are somewhat hostile as far as business is concerned, yet, are all bound in a wise, one-front, all-national understanding?

    Secondly: Why do our political national organizations, such as the Federation of the Ukrainians in the United States, and The Ukrainian Council, in Philadelphia, which are mutually great enemies, so opposed to each other just like fire and water, why do they have, we ask, this one and the same beautiful aim, the establishment of national unity among Ukrainians? From our investigation we cast out the socialistic federation party in the United 4States and which we do not acknowledge as an organization at all, and which is, according to our views, a foolishly childish burlesque of socialism.

    The answer to the first as well as to the second question is one. It is the national spirit which, by the law of nature, must evolve. Once its evolution is begun no counter force, no enemy can suppress it.

    Nations are made up of individuals, and they have the same right to freedom as each individual has; therefore, a nation must have a full right to independent freedom and must not be impeded in its evolution.

    But can our nation live in freedom under the control of German iron-clad militarism, when in our own home not we, but a foreign element, shall be the boss? The answer is self-evident. This was the cause to wake up our energetic nation politically with the slogan: "Away with the militarism of the Central Powers ! Away with the control of our nation ! Let freedom of the free nations live!"

    5

    The spirit of this slogan swayed all our newspapers abroad. This attitude of the Ukrainians in the United States is not the result of any agitation, but is just merely the natural outcome of a healthy national spirit.

    The Ukrainian colony in the city of Chicago displayed its energetic national spirit in the preparation of the Ukrainian manifestation, held on May 11, 1918. In the executive committee all the Ukrainian local societies were represented, with the exception of the small group of the socialist party.

    The manifestation of thousands of Ukrainians proved to be a grand success.

    The misunderstanding between the benefit associations and the political organizations has no perceptible effect upon the attitude of the Ukrainian immigrants. Why? Because the national spirit is too powerful to ...

    Ukrainian
    I G, III H, III B 2, I E
  • Ukraina -- June 06, 1918
    Impressions from the Ukrainian Manifestation in Chicago

    Preparation. Meeting place. Order. Parade, Public Meeting place. American Press.

    After a long and exciting discussion, finally a day was appointed for the Ukrainian manifestation. Two long, depressing, unbearable days, preceded the 30th day of May. On the outside was a continuous heavy rain. The horizon was covered with leaden clouds. A heavy oppressive fog began to spread from the lake on all sides. If only for a moment the blue sky would brighten, but no, everything remained as if it were concreted.

    Nature appeared obstinate and as if bent on aggravating the hope for a successful Ukrainian manifestation. Everyone was prepared for a bitter disappointment.

    The 30th of May also came cloudy, all swaddled with clouds. About ten o'clock that morning, the clouds became thin and the fog began to 2disappear. The sun began to shine in the sky.

    From all sides of the city and suburbs the societies accompanied by music, American and Ukrainian banners, began to move into the appointed places.

    Even though there were two meeting places, both were intended for the same cause.

    At one o'clock the signal was given at Oakley Boulevard to march on. The national march was played and all the lodges moved by fours along Chicago Avenue.

    At Hoyne Avenue the independent societies, already waiting in disciplined order, began to fall into one strong, unbroken phalanx. They began to flow into one big family just as the waters of the Dnieper-Slavuta flow 3quietly into the great depths of the Ukrainian Black Sea. A yielding peace and dignity began to show themselves on the cheeks of the people marching and in the eyes of the multitudes an unextinguished fire appeared in a stubborn determination, as if they were answering to their brothers, over the sea, asking for help in the midst of the fire and blood.

    The parade alone was a huge one. One had to wait for half an hour until the thirty societies that numbered nearly five thousand people passed.

    In the front rode men on two horses, and after them followed men bearing thirty or more flags, the flags being mostly American. Only four Ukrainian azure and gold flags were in the parade, belonging to a society which had the true national tendency. We felt the lack of our national colors.

    After the flags, our women followed proudly in Ukrainian costumes. This 4is our glory, our hope, boosting our national costumes everywhere.

    After the women came a decorated wagon, carrying a troop of girls in Red Cross uniforms, and among them the "Svoboda," (Liberty) and "Ukrainia" with chains on their hands, an allegoric picture of our fatherland that in a hard and bloody way gained its liberty and lost it abruptly.

    After this wagon there came in different formations, lodges of male societies, clubs and the sitch. After them came five allegorical emblems representing the United States, France, England, Italy and Belgium. These assured the world that the only rescue for Ukrainia is in being united with the Allies.

    After them followed long ranks of our men, both old and young, preceded by orchestras that played the national marches and hymns almost without stopping. Every society carried a banner with an inscription invoking 5the Allies and Germans to "Let live the true democracy!" Let live the liberty!" "Down with the Kaiser and his regime!" and many such others.

    The thorough, dignified, saintly feeling, the sound of the national melodies and hymns; the display of American and Ukrainian colors under the blissful sun, all this added power and charm to the national manifestation.

    Thousands of people looked on from the buildings, through windows and from balconies.

    The parade came to Pulaski Park. The big hall was filled with three thousand people. Half remained in the park courtyard.

    Public Meeting. In the hall everyone was very calm. The band played the American national anthem. Dr. Vladimir Siemenovich greets the assembled with the words, "Glory! Glory! Glory!" He speaks with youthful 6zest about the significance of this moment and protests against the breach of Germany's agreement with Ukrainia at Brest-Litovsk. In sharp words he begs the gathering to protest against the violence of Germany toward Ukrainia.

    The second speaker on the platform was Father Nicholas Hutynsky. He spoke with great enthusiasm, pointing to the gains of the French and American revolution, pointing out that our future lies in the lot of truly democratic states of the world and in the loyalty of the Ukrainians to the United States.

    The third speaker was Dr. Stephen Hryniewiecky, whom the public greeted with great applause.

    He spoke in a dignified manner and with well chosen words, joining his address in thought to those of the previous speakers, assuring us that 7notwithstanding all the adverse powers, our nation remains still in its harmonious strength, in its national consciousness and solidarity.

    Every speech was alternated with singing by the choruses of M. Sysenko, Boyan and Bandurysk. They impressed the listeners with beautiful native and foreign songs. All the choruses sang wonderfully, feeling the importance of the time and place. Above all the Boyan chorus was at its zenith under the capable direction of Madam Hryniewiecky, with its strength, fairness and symphony.

    Then followed speakers from other Slavic nationalities according to the program. Mr. I. Smolinsky greeted the Ukrainian assembly from the Poles. He wished freedom to the Ukrainians, Poles and all the Slavic peoples.

    The greatest enthusiasm was shown when the American congressman, Mr. McCormick, appeared. With a strong voice he won the souls of the listeners very effectively. He spoke on the meaning of today's war, 8pointing out the facts about the Allies, saying that in the United States is found the only bulwark of real democracy, and the mainstay of the Allies' strength. This in the end will put down the brutal German militarism. He bade the Ukrainians join the Allies.

    After him followed Mr. Stepina, who spoke for the Czechs, pointing out that Austria and Germany are the greatest enemies of all the Slavs.

    Dr. A. Biankini, for the Croatians, wished for the Ukrainians their freedom, stating that the future hope of the Slavs lies in the federation of all the Slavs.

    Mr. J. Palandech spoke for the Serbs. He said that the Serbs and the Montenegrins sacrificed their lives in the World War for their liberty and that of all the Slavs.

    Mr. I. Zuzek spoke for the Slovenes and assured the Ukrainians of the 9sympathy and the attachment of the Slovenian people to the Ukrainians.

    Father H. Pakalnis, on the part of the Lithuanians, shortly related the history of the union of Ukrainia with Lithuania, and talked on the Polish nobility as the mutual enemy of both Lithuania and Ukrainia.

    Among other Ukrainian speakers that deserve credit are Mr. P. Ikach, who spoke for the Ukrainian Federation of the Socialist Party in America. He protested against Germany's abolishing the Ukrainian Central Rada (council) and against the self-styled hetman Skoropadsky.

    Then followed Father H.Homitsky who fervently pointed out the progress of the struggle for the national liberty of the Ukrainians in Austria 10and begged them to join all the other Slavic nations against Germany and Austria.

    Every speaker was greeted with great applause, and everyone went home filled with enthusiasm.

    After the meeting followed a reception in the Hotel La Salle, in which practically all the speakers took part.

    On the following morning news of the Ukrainian manifestation appeared in almost all the local American newspapers.

    The fullest account appeared in the Daily News, the Tribune, and the Morning Herald.

    Yet these news articles were all very short in spite of the fact that there were two American correspondents at the gathering who were given 11ample and exhaustive information. The article printed in the above mentioned newspapers were beneficial mostly to the Slavonic League, whose existence we do not even know, let alone how this league favors the Ukrainian cause. In them, likewise, were registered personal ambitions of some of our leaders, who are infected with the mania for greatness, and who want to obtain the biggest credit and glory for themselves. They would surely take all the credit to themselves if they could, for planning this manifestation, especially those that probably did not use any effort at all. It would be well if the leaders who are better informed about this Slavonic League would convey to us what positions they hold in the above mentioned League.

    In the end we can proudly state that the Ukrainian colony in Chicago acquired great moral benefit from this manifestation.

    The people saw for themselves how strength is created when they unite 12solidly in the national cause.

    We expected, however, that the arrangers of the manifestation would know how to interest American political circles in the Ukrainian cause on a broader scale. In this direction the manifestation brought little or absolutely no gain! For this great failure on the part of those who arranged the Ukrainian manifestation there awaits a reckoning before our people, who underwent so much trouble and who made such heavy expenditures.

    Preparation. Meeting place. Order. Parade, Public Meeting place. American Press. After a long and exciting discussion, finally a day was appointed for the Ukrainian manifestation. Two long, depressing, unbearable days, ...

    Ukrainian
    I G, III B 2, III H, I C, IV
  • Sichovi Visty -- July 13, 1918
    The Only Orientation (Excerpt)

    Here in the United States of America, the Siege Organization calls upon each and everyone of you: Give up dirty politics; wipe out even the last speck of dust that is left from the old way of traveling through roadless jungles; cast out profitless fables, and roll up your sleeves and start out some real work, some profitable activity. Our field in that direction is covered with weeds, and it will take some time to get rid of them, especially if we continue to follow the same roads.

    Regardless of where you are, join the Athletic Siege Organization; it is our strength, our future, and the training center of the true sons of Ukrainia. How to take it up, how to make it fit our circumstances, our present writing will teach you. It will be particularly dedicated toward this end. Let there be not a single Ukrainian who will not read this newspaper.

    2

    After all, the object of this paper is clear. In it you will not find any politics, abuse or cheating, but a sincere word of truth, a word of true counsel at this momentous time. Neither the Siege Organization nor its periodical has any aim of rivalry, disruption, or conniving for reorganization. Their aim is to care for that, which has been up to the present time not taken care of sincerely, and which is so necessary for a harmonious development of our culture. Therefore, we are trying to safeguard ourselves ahead of time from all sorts of attacks, - and it is quite hard to avoid them altogether, - on the part of eventual enemies. Whoever is an enemy of this periodical, he is also an enemy of our culture, of our progress; he is a traitor to our cause. Spread these writings everywhere, wherever the Ukrainian spirit is present: among the young and old; men and women. Join the Ukrainian Siege branches all over the United States.

    Remember that in a sound body a sound mind.

    M. D.

    Here in the United States of America, the Siege Organization calls upon each and everyone of you: Give up dirty politics; wipe out even the last speck of dust that ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, II B 2 d 1, II D 1, III H
  • Sichovi Visty -- September 16, 1918
    Protocol of the Ukrainian Convention of the Siege Organization Officers in the United States

    [Note: This applies to Chicago, the Siege center since 1920]

    The convention of the Siege organization officers took place on Sunday, August 25, 1918, at 1 P.M., at the Ukrainian National Hall, 217-219 East 6th Street, New York, N. Y.

    Peter Zadoretsky opened the meeting with a short speech. John Boyko, from Bridgeport, was elected Siege organization officer in the United States; Korese, chairman of the meeting; and Alexander Hyssa, his secretary.

    W. Serbay, an officer of the organization, made a motion which was seconded, and the meeting decided that it be called an annual meeting. Carried.

    2

    Then they took count of those present. Besides the officers, there were many guests, especially Siege members of New York. Reading of the minutes was followed by ardent discussion. Finally, they came to the conclusion that the officers of the Siege Organization did everything possible for the good of the organization in the United States, for which they were complimented.

    They also discussed the results of the Siege festival which took place on July 14, 1918. After a lively discussion, the matter was settled and it was proved that the Siege Organization did not have anything to do with the affair which took place between M. Sitchynsky and I. Dobryansky, and that the Siege Organization, and particularly the New York Branch which took charge of that festival, did not know anything about Mr. Hundiak's distributing rudely satirical handbills against Mr. Sitchynsky, or that the latter wanted to speak at the Siege festival. Consequently, all the 3gossip written in the National Will are without foundation.

    Then followed the business of the Siege News, and after a long discussion it was resolved, (1) that the Siege organ, the Siege News, continue, as at present, to be published once a month; (2) that the Siege newspaper shall not infringe upon any Ukrainian political party nor any of the benevolent societies; (3) that the Siege newspaper must take an impartial stand; (4) that the Siege newspaper's purpose is to propagate spiritual and physical culture among the Ukrainian people in America; (5) that the Siege newspaper has no right to insert and publish any propaganda whereby the Ukrainian people as a whole may be misled.

    Simultaneously it was resolved that the Siege News shall publish free of charge any advertisement of the branches of the Siege organization.

    4

    Further, it was resolved that it is the duty of every branch of the Ukrainian Siege Organization to contribute ten dollars to the press fund; and further, that it is the duty of every Siege member of both sexes to read the Siege News and to get new subscribers. As a result, they elected an editorial committee, as follows: M. Diachyshyn, Editor; V. Vintoniak, treasurer; A. Hyssa, secretary.

    Taking advantage of this opportunity, they resolved that the General Siege Convention should take place on Labor Day, 1919, in the City of New York.

    Basil Serbay was elected head organizer of the Siege branches in the United States of America.

    The meeting having finished its outlined program, John Boyko called upon those present to contribute freely to the press fund, to which they answered with generous contributions.

    5

    The meeting ended with the Siege hymn "Yonder on the mountain, the Siege is marching."

    Alexander Hyssa, secretary

    [Note: This applies to Chicago, the Siege center since 1920] The convention of the Siege organization officers took place on Sunday, August 25, 1918, at 1 P.M., at the Ukrainian ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, II B 2 d 1, III B 4, III H
  • Ukraina -- January 16, 1919
    On Entering and Leaving the United States

    In certain circles there are conflicting thoughts that the immigrant's sojourn depends on his signing or failure to sign his intention to return to this country.

    In order to correct this disputed question, the State Department says that all the rights and privileges of foreigners for coming in and going out remain as formerly. On no occasion are the foreigners allowed either to come into or leave the United States unless they abide by these rules. It appears that these rules will be enforced until the proclamation of world peace, if no longer.

    No one has any right to make any plans for crossing the ocean or accepting money as a down payment for ocean tickets with any promise, clear or self-understood, nor to grant the right to leave the United States. Only the government officials, authorized by the State Department, have the right to grant such permission, and even they cannot assure 2anyone beforehand that permission will be granted. Those wanting to depart should make application in the proper department, the one nearest to his city and not at the port from which he intends to leave. The applicant should not leave his city until he receives the department's permission to leave the United States.

    In certain circles there are conflicting thoughts that the immigrant's sojourn depends on his signing or failure to sign his intention to return to this country. In order to correct ...

    Ukrainian
    III G, III H
  • Ukraina -- February 22, 1919
    Education

    Practical studies in mathematics, geometry and physics for the Ukrainian workingman will begin in a few days under the tutorship of a capable Ukrainian teacher.

    The classes will be held in the evenings. Those wishing to know more should realize that at times like these education is needed by every cultured worker who wants to better his personal position in his calling. Please take advantage of this fine opportunity!

    Remember that the liberated independent Ukrainia will need good intelligent men and expert mechanics that can stand the competition with the qualified workingmen of this country.

    For all information you should turn to the newspaper Ukraina, 2152 W. Chicago Avenue; in the evenings, from 5 to 7, beginning with Saturday, 2February 22. (Note: This school was organized by Ukraina).

    Enrollment will be accepted from the 22nd to the 25th of February.

    Practical studies in mathematics, geometry and physics for the Ukrainian workingman will begin in a few days under the tutorship of a capable Ukrainian teacher. The classes will be held ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 2 f, I A 1 a, III H
  • Ukraina -- March 15, 1919
    The Ukrainian Women in Public and Family Life

    When we think upon important obligations that women have to fulfill and the influence that they have on the national life, we shall then see what a wife means to a husband, a mother to children, a housewife to a household.

    Can a husband expect enjoyment in life when in marriage - in this purest union of mutual associations - he sees only the misfortunes? What will happen to children who are the future generations of all nations, when the mother neglects them from the very beginning of their existence?

    Housewives destroy homes or build them. On them depends the question of the family's prosperity and health, or its misfortune and dissolution. A sensible woman builds the home while a foolish woman wrecks it with her own hands, says the national proverb.

    2

    Where a home has a decent, understanding housewife, the home is the abode of peace, of concord, and of love. When a woman abandons the great purpose with which she is charged by the very nature of her position; where she merely exists in the family, neglecting to develop her spiritual qualities, and living a worthless, useless life - in such a home the beauty of life is lost, and in its stead comes discord, hatred and misfortunes.

    Our women should take this under consideration. They should understand their obligations, and thus find the source of evil hiding in their families.

    What are we women to do here in America? Our life seethes with confusion. We settle in the slums and do not show ourselves in public life among the people. With this inactivity no cause, neither our own personal affairs, nor our national life, is of any interest to us.

    3

    We think that we are created only to look well while young, to dress well, to work hard for others. Sometimes we go to dances and eventually we get married. Then we grow old and die, leaving behind us no fond remembrances. This is the life of a servant, a slave, a purposeless creature, and unworthy serf. We must remember we are rational beings.

    It must not continue like this. We, the Ukrainian women, must learn to think independently, to gaze at the world with our own eyes, and interest ourselves with things of public and national importance. When we put this question to ourselves: "What are nations?" After a thorough consideration, we come to the conclusion that they are a union of families, which have a great deal in common. It is evident at once that every mother of a family has the greatest obligation to carry out. Obligations imposed upon women should not confine themselves only to one's own family by blood, but should spread themselves to 4the families of one's native people. The existence of a nation requires work in community life with all its sons. Without work the nation fails.

    Yet all do not work with us. That is why the cause of women has laid the burden of this message upon us, of asking all the members of Ukrainian families, including women, to work for the national cause.

    Nature provided us with the heart and the courage to stand. With these qualities every husband is able to stand. When we, the women, devote ourselves. to the national cause we shall bring to the work all those men that still sleep shamelessly.

    The Ukrainian nation is carrying on an obstinate fight now for its existence. Beyond the ocean, in our native land, they all work harmoniously together for the independence of their fatherland. They call upon us to be ready to help them. As with other nations, so it 5is with us. Women should be the very fire, the zeal, the warmth that adds willingness to the fighters in a war for a better lot.

    We are lucky that we have lived to see the long looked-for moment of the liberation of the Ukrainian nation and its soil. We are lucky and glad. But let us remember that our nation is ruined by war, that it needs creative strength for its existence which will make it stead-fast in attaining its aspirations. We shall stand for our native country in its great adventure. We shall return to the old country more enlightened than we left it. With due knowledge we will be in power to rear the future generations in a better way for our country. We will give to the fatherland strong and healthy sons both in spirit and in body, sons who will be able to defend our native country from its wicked enemies. There is no luck, there is no better lot in the world than that afforded by an education.

    Look for them, my sisters. You will find them in knowledge.

    When we think upon important obligations that women have to fulfill and the influence that they have on the national life, we shall then see what a wife means to ...

    Ukrainian
    I K, I B 3 a, III H
  • Sichovi Visty -- April 01, 1919
    A New Siege Branch in Chicago

    In the last issue we informed you of the new Chicago Siege branch and of the new local subscribers of the Sichovi Visty. The first Chicago branch of the Siege Organization was organized as branch No. 15, and in addition to that there is another branch organized in the locality of Burnside, Chicago, branch No. 17, whose officers are as follows:

    Michael Kotzolowsky, Jr., district commander; John Kotzolowsky, centurion; Peter Sokol, secretary; Joseph Horowsky, treasurer.

    First lieutenants: Basil Dudyk, and Nicholas Ivanio.

    Second lieutenants: Marko Kapusta, and Joseph Katzolowsky.

    Flag bearers: Joseph Kopchak, for the American flag; Peter Doloshitsky, for the Ukrainian flag.

    2

    Bugler: Andrew Hankiwsky; economist: Andrew Basnyk.

    The district commander of the Siege writes to the head commander as follows:

    "I have good news for you. Our Siege members are beginning to learn to play various instruments, and at the same time they are preparing themselves for the drama 'The Stolen Luck."

    "When the next issue of the Sichovi Visty comes out, please send me seventy-five copies of it."

    In the last issue we informed you of the new Chicago Siege branch and of the new local subscribers of the Sichovi Visty. The first Chicago branch of the Siege ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, II D 1, III H