The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Sichovi Visty -- July 13, 1918
    (No headline)

    Ukrainian youth! Undoubtedly the Siege News appears at the proper time. At this opportune time it brings to you a highly ideal slogan: "In the healthy body, a healthy mind."

    It is at the right time that this sacred work is being started; the work which tends to organize our youth into the Siege Organization, with the object of helping a balanced development of the physical and spiritual forces of the commonalty. In other words, to help to unfold the all around proper balanced development of the youth in America. This kind of upbringing is positively necessary. Even although this work is somewhat belated, nevertheless it is better late than never.

    May we say one thing on our behalf, that the founders of the Siege News do not have any intention of satisfying their private ambition. The Siege News is a crystallization of wishes which are founded on idealism and love of the nation, especially the youth. The Siege News 2goes to you, the progeny of our famous forefathers, to help to bring out and show forth the life-giving light, to uplift the average person both physically and spiritually, to lay a foundation on which we can build a plan for a fulfillment of our national duty here.

    When we observe the development of cultured nations, we notice that they, in bringing up the new generation, took into consideration a balanced development both intellectually and physically. The results of this upbringing were such that sickly-looking individuals were almost entirely eliminated; there was no prematurely old youth, no pessimists, no individuals careless toward the affairs of their own nation. The importance of such upbringing was properly understood in the old country during the last years before the World War. Every 3one there looked intelligently upon the development of our Ukrainian "eagle" and "Siege" ranks, for they knew the consequential meaning of it all. The brutal ruinous war did not spare our "eagles" and "Sieges." Yet, one day the war will be over and they will arise again to life.

    In America, for several years there was felt an ardent necessity of the Siege Organization. Here our youth is exposed to a thousand and one dangers. Now, when we look upon the life with our own eyes, the American youth, not only in the educational institutions but also in clubs, cares for a physical development: our own youth, however, is getting dissipated before, our very eyes. Our youth here is on the road to ruin.

    We cannot say that our Ukrainian youth does not like athletic associations. We can gather many facts which prove that many a Ukrainian young man belongs to foreign organizations. This is a great loss to 4our own nation. We must not permit our energetic youth to lose itself in the foreign scattered fields.

    Some years ago many branches of our Siege Organization were opened. This is a comeback to the better. This is a nice beginning. Let us not fold our arms; let us not abandon our well-begun work. "Well begun is half done" only then, when the other half is not slept through.

    On our part we have done, are doing, and will do everything to make the Siege Organization grow for the good and glory of this country and Ukrainia.

    In order to animate thoroughly the Ukrainian Siege movement in America, we undertake to publish The Siege News. Let us not put any political program ahead of another. Our object is: to train the youth of Ukrainian descent of both sexes, and the training of the youth will be of such 5a nature that both physical and intellectual faculties simultaneously will be taken care of by a development of the physical energy through athletics, and the young mind through reading the proper literature, lectures, etc. The character of such training is of a patriotic nature. When our youth is well educated and enlightened, then it will follow such political roads which will add the most for the good of the whole nation.

    "In the sound body, a sound mind!" When our physical strength develops by joint physical drills, then our minds will crave also for work and knowledge. Then we shall help the youth to get rid of thousands imperfections which fall into their eyes. Then we shall guard the youth from thousands of dangers, against languish and demoralization, of which Ukrainia will be proud.

    We send out to you this first issue of the Siege News. Let this our 6periodical be the center of the life of our youth. Let it keep us united in one large family; let is lead us always onward to progress, to everything uplifting and sublime. Let it long live and serve for the glory and good of the whole nation.

    With sending to you this first issue of the Siege News, we appeal to you: Join one and all the Siege Organization! Open up Siege branches everywhere. Unite, work, and educate yourselves! On this depends our future.

    Accept the Siege News with such love as we are sending it out into the world.

    We are aware of having done our part! Now it is up to you, Ukrainian youth, to do yours!

    Ukrainian youth! Undoubtedly the Siege News appears at the proper time. At this opportune time it brings to you a highly ideal slogan: "In the healthy body, a healthy mind." ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, III E, II B 3, II B 2 d 1, I M, III A
  • Sichovi Visty -- August 15, 1918
    Why Was the Ukrainian Siege Organization Established in America By J. Sharowsky, Siege Secretary

    Some individuals think that the Siege was established by a group seeking honors and titles as Siege officers. As a result of this it is no wonder that although it is almost two years since the Siege was established, only a comparatively small number realize its real purpose.

    When we look more closely into the life of the immigrant, we notice that all nationality groups have their organizations in order to get together now and then. The so-called athletic organizations draw our attention particularly. There is hardly a foreign national group in this country that won't recognize the value of physical drills and athletics. For instance, let us take the Czechs. They take particular care in training their youth. Therefore, it is no wonder that when one visits a Czech Eagle lodge one cannot help but noticing how the old mothers bring their 2children to the drills.

    Why? Because they know that physical drills build a healthy body, beautifys it, develop perserverance, and add years to one's life. If children are healthy, so will be the nation, and this applies to any nation. Let us turn our attention to ourselves. Who of us ever thought of the blessings brought about by athletics? It has been over thirty years since our immigration started into this country, and nobody has ever mentioned anything seriously about athletics yet. All of us seem to look at it indifferently, although there are many who know that for us Ukrainians it is indispensably necessary; yet during all that time they did not do anything in this direction. Meanwhile, our youth, feeling the necessity of physical drill, joined clubs hostile to us, for the sake of gymnastics. This is why today we find a number of Ukrainians in the ranks of the Polish Eagle organization. They speak Polish as fluently as if they did not know their native language or neglected it. And today we complain that our Ukrainians read Polish newspapers and speak their language, but we do not try to find the cause of this evil, and even though we see it, we are ashamed to tell 3ourselves the truth straight from the shoulder, that this is our own fault.

    The saying goes: Bend the tree while it is young. So, if we had undertaken that work right from the start, then today, positively we would exceed twice 500,000 immigrants, for we emigrated in a far greater number than they actually give us credit for. Alas, many foreign elements unjustly claim any number of Ukrainina immigrants. To counteract this situation at least in part, we established the Siege Organization, which has for its object the training of the Ukrainian Youth, both physically and spiritually. Everyone of us already know that in a sound body there is a sound mind.

    The Siege organization answers all the requirements of the Ukrainian nation. Therefore, there should not be found a single one from among us that should join an encampment hostile to us. There is among us our own organization. The officers of the Siege Organization will do everything in their power to attain this aim. From now on we cannot complain any longer that there is not any organization of this kind among ourselves. Take advantage of it, everyone of you; take advantage of this accomplishment, which is established through you, for you, and among you.

    Some individuals think that the Siege was established by a group seeking honors and titles as Siege officers. As a result of this it is no wonder that although it ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, I A 1 a, II B 3, III G, I C
  • Sichovi Visty -- March 15, 1922
    To District Leaders, Their Assistants, Branch Officers and Members of the Siege Organization in Chicago and All Over the United States By Dr. Stephen K. Hrynevetsky, Chicago Physician

    On March 1, 1922, the Central Headquarters of the Siege Organization, with its offices in Chicago, elected me as its chief executive. Herein I wish to take this opportunity to extend my thanks to all those Siege branches that voted in my favor as well as those who refrained from voting, possibly due to some good reason.

    In taking the required oath the central staff imposed on me this sacred duty: to do my full share in trying to spread and strengthen the Siege Organization.

    I took the oath to follow the Siege by-laws, and in the meantime I wish to remind you, Siege members, that you also took the very same oath.

    2

    Dear Siege members, the duty imposed on me by the executives of the Siege organization was also indirectly imposed by you. Yet, I cannot fulfill them without your generous help.

    In my opinion, my election to this office was possibly most opportune. However, my orders and your full cooperation must go hand-in-hand in order to reach the desired end.

    The Siege organization came to a stand still, as far as I can see, due to two principal causes: 1) Lack of discipline and cooperation; 2) unwelcome habits of breaking decrees or not touching them at all.

    I accepted the office as the head of the Siege Central Staff with this one aim in view: to do away with everything that would be an impediment to the organization. I am sure that with your wholehearted help we shall be able to accomplish those great things for which the organization was primarily established.

    3

    The Siege by-laws paragraph 21, article VI, reads that the decisions of the chief executive (Otaman) with his assistants, in all things pertaining to the business of the organization, have full force and can be changed or annulled only by a general convention.

    According to this paragraph I, with the consent of the entire executive staff, am obliged to send out to all branches of the Siege organization the following orders:

    1) The district head officers' attention is called to the fact that up to April 29, 1922, all their members' dues accounts are to be straightened out. Paragraph 65, article IX, of the Siege by-laws is to be explained so that the contents of the paragraph refer only to single branches or to their individual members.

    2) Headquarters must recieve all the members' dues and contributions to the press fund one month ahead, that is on the day of the 29 of each 4preceding month. Dues of twenty cents per member each Siege branch office must collect and forward to the Central Headquarters on the time specified above.

    3) Let it be known to all members that not only membership dues, but also subscriptions for the Siege News are to be paid in advance. That is, everything must be paid up by April 29, according to the new ruling.

    4) Now, on March 29, the district head officers should see to it that an exact account is sent to the Central Headquarters so that extracts of their doings can be published in the Siege News. The main topic being their athletic activity. The central office must know where, and how many members take part in athletics, and what percentage do not.

    5) It is also commanded that the district heads see to it that each branch commander gives time, during every monthly meeting and before or after weekly athletic exercises, for discussion of questions of popular sciences, and thus help the members broaden their horizon of general knowledge.

    5

    6) It is commanded that at no meeting or gathering of any kind, there be any dispute, quarrel, outright antipathy, or unnecessary offense directed against any political party or religious sect that may differ from ours.

    7) It is commanded that all district commanders and assistants keep in mind that all weekly athletic gatherings as well as all monthly Siege meetings should open and close with this command: "Company, attention!" While doing this the right hand should rest on the chest, thus they should remain silent for one minute. During this silence every one should think and strongly desire independence for Urkrainia. Then the national anthem should follow.

    8) We appeal to all district and branch officers to inform their members that by April 1, a new password will be sent out to all the officers, and they will communicate it down to every member of their branch or company.

    6

    9) We appeal to all district and branch officers as well as all Siege members to see to it that at no time should anyone give out those passwords to anyone but Siege members. This is to prevent the possible presence of an enemy at any meeting, thus causing unnecessary disturbances.

    10) It is the duty of all district officers and assistants to see to it that their district councils are regularly conducted, and that the above commands and appeals are complied with by themselves and members. The officers have the right to punish, according to Siege by-laws, those of their members who do not fulfill their obligations.

    11) All orders and commands from the commander-in-chief are to be read immediately after the first command of attention, and as soon as all those present are accounted for. The United States Army discipline is to be followed as closely as possible.

    7

    12) It is the duty of the officers at the head of districts to inform and notify their branch officers, and these, their subordinates and the rest of their Siege members, of anything that is to take place in their own branches and districts. In a similar way, all are to be informed of general doings of the whole Siege Organization.

    On March 1, 1922, the Central Headquarters of the Siege Organization, with its offices in Chicago, elected me as its chief executive. Herein I wish to take this opportunity to ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, II B 2 g, II B 3
  • Sichovi Visty -- January 25, 1924
    Chicago News

    Michael Shvets, proprietor of a large drugstore in the Ukrainian colony in Chicago, is now convalescing, and has begun to take charge of his business again.

    Alexander Harkavenko, one of the greatest Ukrainian wrestlers has been victorious over all Chicago wrestlers matched against him so far. Much credit is due him because he does not as yet know the technique of American wrestling. No one, no matter how strong, has been able to defeat him because of his extraordinary strength. It is humorous to see that in a short time he has become victorious even over the strongest wrestlers. Everybody foretells a brilliant future for him in his wrestling career.

    Michael Shvets, proprietor of a large drugstore in the Ukrainian colony in Chicago, is now convalescing, and has begun to take charge of his business again. Alexander Harkavenko, one of ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 3, I D 1 b
  • Sichovi Visty -- March 10, 1924
    Ukrainian Opera in Chicago

    Ukrainian life in Chicago becomes and more interesting. The great wrestler from Ukrainia Alexander Harkavenko has attracted the attention of other nationalities to himself as well as to Ukrainians in general.

    Now the Ukrainian opera, under the direction of Mr. Karalash, from Cherson, Ukrainia, ex-member of the Russian operas as well as a member of the Grand Opera in Chicago, enjoys great popularity.

    Sunday, February 24, a Ukrainian opera organized by him, made its first appearance on the stage and presented "The Cossack Beyond the Danube." The outcome was just wonderful in almost every way.

    Mrs. Cymbalist unquestionably deserves the first laurel of distinction in her part as "Daria." She surely can act and sing impressively on any stage of any city in the world.

    2

    Mr. Svitlow, in the role of "Andrew," represented a real cossack-Zaporozets, both in acting and singing.

    His sweetheart in the role of "Oksana," played astonishingly well. Her melodious accentuation and enunciation of the Ukrainian language is unsurpassable.

    The roles of the "Sultan," and Imam," were very well-played by one and the same person.

    The role of the "Chinaman," bodyguard of the sultan, played by Dmitro Atamanec could not have been rendered any better.

    The most difficult part, that of "Ivan" was played by the organizer of this group, Mr. Nicholas Karalash. He did not portray this character as just a mere drunkard, but seemingly dizzy with drinks, yet shrewd and diplomatic to infinity with a refined soul and a cossack's daring courage.

    3

    "Odarka" came out wonderfully well in every respect. All the nuances of the sulky and occasionally enraged woman, who had been disappointed in love were expressed very well both in her singing and acting, considering the fact that she is just an amateur. Just think what a grand star she would make, if she could give all of her time and attention to this artistic profession. In this role, she had one great disadvantage, her partner was suffering from a severe case of the grip. He could hardly sing at all, and most of his part he skilfully recited; yet she knew how to cover it up so deftly that it would have taken a real artist, who knows opera quite well, to notice the shortcomings of this opera. So much for the actors.

    The most obvious shortcoming was the fact that the orchestra and the singers had not had enough practice together in rehearsals. Regardless of how good the orchestra may be, or how excellently the players may perform, a joint practice in rehearsal in indispensable; here was the real difficulty. Even though the chorus could have been compared to a human pipe organ, and the orchestra was well selected for the occasion, they could have performed together much better if they had 4both sacrificed more time for joint rehearsals. Fortunately, they came out quite well, but on the other hand it tells us that although we have such a capable company both of musicians and performers, there was room for improvement from the general point of view. Well, as long as there is worth-while material, and they are conscious of their shortcomings, then all that is needed is more general practice with the orchestra.

    Our public, above all the Siege members, I am sure will excuse them this time, and will help to support this great cultural activity of theirs in the future. We firmly hope that Mr. Karalash, together with all the Chicago Ukrainian intelligentsia, will work for the complete success of the opera in the very near future.

    S. H.

    Ukrainian life in Chicago becomes and more interesting. The great wrestler from Ukrainia Alexander Harkavenko has attracted the attention of other nationalities to himself as well as to Ukrainians in ...

    Ukrainian
    II A 3 b, II A 3 d 1, II B 3
  • Sitch -- December 05, 1924
    Sitch Holiday (Summary)

    On November 24, 1924, through the efforts of the Second Division of the Sitch Organization, a celebration was held commemorating the sixth anniversary of the conquering of Lviw by the Ukrainian armies. Those who witnessed this celebration surely thought that the Ukrainian group of Chicago had never held such a great celebration, and even questioned whether it was ever possible to witness a similar celebration anywhere in the United States.

    Already a few weeks before this day, great enthusiasm in anticipation could be noticed everywhere among our people.

    On Sunday, at 5 P. M., the hall at Oakley and Rice Streets, decorated with national colors, was filled.

    2

    On the front wall hung portraits of patrons (renowned patriots) of every company of the Second Division. The portraits were illuminated with many colored lights. Near them stood about one hundred armed Sitch men and women, under the command of Ataman D. Zabolotsky, waiting to march to church for the requiem services to be held for the dead heroes of the Ukrainian armies.

    At six o'clock the church was filled. In the center was a sham grave decorated with flowers and grass, which represented the graves of the Ukrainian soldiers. On both sides of the grave stood uniformed Sitch members--totaling over one hundred in two long lines.

    Father F. Tarnawsky, gray but young in spirits, conducted the vespers. After the vespers he came to the pulpit and, loudly but shortly, vividly explained our struggle for the freedom of the Ukraine. He compared the holiday of November First--holiday of the resurrection of the Western Ukraine--with the 3holiday of the resurrection of Christ. He concluded his sermon with the words of Shevchenko: "Wake up! Break the chains!"

    The requiem services then started. Standing were two priests, Father F. Tarnawsky and Father O. Prodan. The chorus was singing "Everlasting Memories." The Sitch members were standing at attention and saluting the heroes; chests were throbbing; hearts were pounding. From the green, decorated grave a faint voice seemed to be issuing: "Farewell brothers, we have honorably crossed the great road of love." The first part of the program was then over.

    [Translator's note: The second part of the celebration was going on in the hall. It was inaugurated by a vocal number by Mr. D. Zabolotsky. Then came a song by the women's choir directed by Mr. D. Atamanets. Other vocal selections as well as physical exercises, performed alternatively by boys and girls, followed. The leader was Mr. Stephen Musiychuk. There were also violin solos 4(by Miss A. Motluk), singing by Miss Stephanie Tymkevych and Mrs. Stephanie Tsymbalist, and recitations by Mr. S. Musiychuk. After the solo vocal selections by Mr. D. Atamanets and Miss Anna Winiarska, Dr. O. Nazaruk, editor of Sitch, gave a ten-minute speech on the united front of all Ukrainians as a prerequisite of a free Ukraine.]

    After a short pause, the eighty leaders of all the companies of the Second Division appeared on the scene, followed by the Chief Ataman, Dr. Stephen Hrynevetsky. Mr. Stephen Musiychuk, the Secretary-General, read the special documents and handed them to the Chief Ataman as well as to the district leaders. Then Mr. Musiychuk read the special communications of the district managements, and, while delivering a truncheon into the hands of the Chief Ataman, pronounced these words: "With this truncheon we place into your hands the fate of our organization. This truncheon is not made of gold and is not covered with gems, but we believe that some day our Ukraine shall be free, and then this truncheon shall shine too, as was prophesied by Shevchenko:

    5

    'And then shall flare up the truncheon from the steppes of Ukraine.' "

    During the last few words, the truncheon rested in the hands of the Chief Ataman, Dr. Stephen Hrynevetsky--the chorus thundered the song "Glory, glory, Ataman!" With tears in his eyes, Dr. Hrynevetsky expressed his appreciation by assuring the audience that the truncheon belonged, not to him, but to a legitimate Hetman of Ukraine. Then he reaffirmed his word with a solemn oath and administered the oath to all the district leaders. He also nominated Rev. Father F. Tarnawsky as chaplain of the organization.

    The celebration was terminated with songs by a male chorus of seventy-five members, under the leadership of Mr. D. Atamanets.

    On November 24, 1924, through the efforts of the Second Division of the Sitch Organization, a celebration was held commemorating the sixth anniversary of the conquering of Lviw by the ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 3 a, II B 3, III H, III C
  • Ukraina -- August 15, 1930
    Ukrainian Tennis Club

    The tennis club which has been recently organized, under the name of "Ukrainian Tennis Club," held its meeting, Wednesday evening, August 6th.

    The administrative body is composed of the following:

    Anastasia Olesko, President; - Al Mack, Secretary;-

    Michael Kereluk, Treasurer.

    This organization is the first of its kind, among the Ukrainians of Chicago. The purpose of the club is to promote athletics, and sports in general. Athletics, as we know, is not only an expression of skill and talent, but is also a great body and character builder. Any nation advocating sports, is assured of a good and healthy class of citizens.

    Ukrainians are great sport loving people. Their success in base-ball, foot-ball, and other athletics is remarkable.

    Tennis is practiced by many of our Athletes, throughout the country. Anyone becoming a member of such an organization, as the Tennis Club, or any other athletic society, is assured of many beneficial factors. In tennis as in other sports, good sportsmanship, self-sacrifice, good will, and hard labor, find expression. The promotion of national, and social feeling, as well as the out-door exercise, is 2profitable to any member of the organization.

    The Club holds practice games, every Monday, and Thursday evenings, and early Sunday morning, at the Humboldt Park tennis courts.

    Any sport, and outdoor lover, is invited to join in these practice games, at any time.

    The tennis club which has been recently organized, under the name of "Ukrainian Tennis Club," held its meeting, Wednesday evening, August 6th. The administrative body is composed of the following: ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 3
  • Sitch -- March 15, 1932
    Young Sitch Activities

    We have taken pride, in the past, in boasting of the fighting deeds of our Cossacks and of other great men who have fought for their ideals, but why should we be content just to extol those who fought in the past? Why not turn a leaf of our own, and show the world that this present, young generation of Ukrainians is as capable, if not more so, of performing similar deeds or (if we may be so bold as to say) even greater ones than those of our forefathers?

    In order to show the world what we are and what we can do, we must have a proper place in which to demonstrate our ever-present desire and ability to do things. We must have a home of our own. All Sitch companies and Ukrainian church organizations of Chicago have pledged themselves to support any movement to build schools and athletic homes for the young Ukrainian generation in Chicago and vicinity. The members of these organizations should be 2highly commended for the extreme interest they have taken, and we, the young generation, should forever feel deeply indebted to them.

    What have we to show that we are worthy of such loyal support, and how can we express our gratitude and appreciation? The least that we can do is to show our interest by pushing, pulling, dragging, and striving by every means humanly possible to support the worthy movement.

    Sitch Company I is very much interested in the construction of a building on the Saint Nicholas church grounds in Chicago, where space could be provided for both a school and a gymnasium. Toward this end Sitch Company I together with Central Headquarters is sponsoring an amateur championship boxing contest, the proceeds of which will be used to help furnish athletic equipment for our new gymnasium, and, at the same time the Ukrainian champions of the various boxing classes will be determined. The final winners of these contests 3will be awarded beautiful prizes by the Reverend Father F. Tarnawsky, including a trip to Cleveland or Detroit, where the Ukrainian boxing championships of the United States of America will be decided. This boxing contest is open to all Ukrainian boys up to twenty-eight years of age, regardless of where they may reside, their standing, or whatever organization they represent. The only requisite is that they be of Ukrainian birth or descent.

    Let's go, you young Ukrainians, and show our fathers and mothers that we are capable of doing things. Enroll in this contest and show your ability!

    We have taken pride, in the past, in boasting of the fighting deeds of our Cossacks and of other great men who have fought for their ideals, but why should ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 3, III E, I C
  • Ukrainian Youth -- March 31, 1935
    Sports

    This year our St. Nicholas Church will be well represented in the sport world. To date we have two baseball teams, both of which have in the past years proven themselves worthy of the task of representing our church.

    The first which plays under the nick name of the Elks, has been for the last three years showing great promise as to a future Ukrainian Championship team of Chicago. Last year they beat the South Side Representatives (St Mary's baseball-team) three times out of a possible three. This year they intend to repeat their invasion of the South Siders and add to their lists the scalps of the Cicero baseball team. The Cossack team better take notice, for it won't be long before the Elks start going after their scalps.

    The second, a girl's team, which plays under the name of Zippers, has also done many great thing in the past. Last year under the managership of Stella Sweda and Anne Demetro they beat the Cicero Championship baseball team two games out of a possible four. This year with Stella Gabro (Captain of the team for the past two seasons) acting as their pilot they intend to perfect their record against the Cicero team.

    Among other teams which have been developed at our church, but will be representing 2private concerns are the Cossacks who hope & possess the backing of the Chi-Oak Tavern, and the St. Nicholas team who has as its backers the Ukrainian Professional Business Men's Ass'n.

    The Cossacks who at one time were without a doubt the Champions of Chicago three years ago, under the managership of J. Evankoe will again try and rebuild their reputation which has been broken on account of the poor showing of last year. Proof that they have started off in earnest is the fact that they have again picked Jim Evankoe as their manager.

    For all of the above mentioned baseball teams the staff wishes to take this opportunity in wishing each and everyone of the teams the best of luck. May this season be the most successful one of their existence.

    This year our St. Nicholas Church will be well represented in the sport world. To date we have two baseball teams, both of which have in the past years proven ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 3
  • Sichovi Visty -- [Unknown date]
    Siege Physical Drill as Approved by the Chicago Executive Staff Flag Exercise

    Standing at attention, a small flag is held so that the staff of the flag is on the left-hand side, the end of the staff is to be held with the left hand below the waist.

    1. Stepping back on the toes of the left foot, with the flag horizontal and hanging down over the right shoulder so that both ends of the flag hang evenly, while the right hand holds it at the left shoulder and the left hand holds the end of the flag.

    2. The right foot is placed forward keeping the flag even with the other outstretched hand.

    3. Left turn, only do not draw the feet together and keep the head in the same position as in figure No. 2. That is, hold it motionless to the right, keeping the flag also in this position, and at the same time lower oneself 2as if to crouch on one's heels, it will appear that one is aiming to lance someone with the upper end of the flag staff.

    4. Draw the feet together and place the flag staff on the chest as it had been originally.

    Standing at attention, a small flag is held so that the staff of the flag is on the left-hand side, the end of the staff is to be held with ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, II B 3