The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Ukraina -- May 19, 1917
    (By Vladimir Siemenovich) Ukrainian Day

    Another important event in the Chicago Ukrainian life was the "Ukrainian Day." At first there was a misunderstanding in this community; a few even held very boisterous meetings among the members of the "Ukrainian Federation," i. e. among the sympathizers of the "Ukrainian Council." We must admit however, that the Ukrainian intelligentsia of Chicago was seeking an agreement with both these parties while, on the contrary, the general public at first could not find its bearings as to the procedure in the matter. Yet in the end, mainly under the influence of Father Nicholas Strutynsky and a few other intelligent people, there followed agreement, in a way that the "Ukrainian Council" gave to the members of the "Federation" their tags and in return they were given the collection boxes,--and finally they all agreed to work together for the good of their people.

    The District Committee of the "Federation" undertook to see to it that everything is done to put over the "Ukrainian Day" successfully. Madam Strutynsky, Messrs. Kowalsky, Strusevich and Osadovsky, personally worked hard in the organization preparing everything needed for the "Ukrainian Day."

    They applied for help from the Lithuanians, Poles, and even went from house to house collecting from their own as well as from others.

    2

    We must sincerely thank our girls and women that worked ardently on this day, collecting money from the passing people in the streets.

    The committee recommended that Dr. Vladimir Siemenovich and Mr. Strusevich take care of the exterior arrangement of the "Ukrainian Day."

    They arranged for the announcement of the "Ukrainian Day" in American newspapers as much as possible. Thus, all the Chicago papers carried more or less spacious articles. The Chicago Herald even carried an extensive article, stating the present situation and the desire of the Ukrainians for their freedom and independence; so did the Chicago American. Once more did the poetess and writer, Madam Laflin, publish a sketch from the life of a poor Ukrainian family in a very sympathetic spirit.

    Mr. M. Sichynsky and Dr. Siemenovich undertook to request the aldermen, to permit the collecting of money in the streets of Chicago. So a full success was obtained.

    Notwithstanding the fact that Father Nicholas Strutynsky was opposing the independent Church for a long time past, yet during this day he allowed both 3the parishes to hold a meeting of all the Ukrainians in the hall of his Church. This we should be thankful for to him since from that time on both the parties started a mutual understanding.

    The income from the "Ukrainian Day" up till now was $8,353.68, from the "Federations" alone; as to the amount collected by the "Ukrainian Council," I could not find out, but I think that it did not exceed a few hundred dollars; --this however, is quite satisfactory.

    The Chicago American Committee gathered more than $1,300.00 which was added to the whole amount. In this a $1,000.00 check came from a Chicago millionaire, Paten. The Pullman Company sent a separate $50.00 check straight to the Ukrainian "Federation" in New York.

    From the above mentioned amount, we have yet to pay the expenses, but for these expenses a separate collection is being held.

    We must state that the Poles as well as the Lithuanians, backed us considerably, for they sent their girls for the collections;--and the Lithuanians even established a separate committee for themselves and collected nearly $600.00 for the Ukrainians. The exact amount of the offerings and collections 4will be announced in the following issue of the Ukraina. The "Ukrainian Day" brought a great moral profit to the Ukrainians as a whole, besides the material aid.

    Another important event in the Chicago Ukrainian life was the "Ukrainian Day." At first there was a misunderstanding in this community; a few even held very boisterous meetings among the ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, I G, I C
  • Sichovi Visty -- September 20, 1924
    [Ukrainian Carnival] (Advertisement)

    Attention, Ukrainians of Chicago and vicinity! First time in Chicago, a Ukrainian carnival, corner Oakley Boulevard and Rice Street, from September 18 to October 5!

    Countrymen, you have not as yet had such a wonderful opportunity for entertainment as the one now presented to you at this carnival. There are all sorts of games, raffles, social entertainments, witty monologues and, above all, there will be dancing in the open every evening to the music of a well-selected orchestra, all union men. There will also be a bar and a buffet--with all kinds of refreshing drinks and luncheonettes. In short, there will be everything worth while in the way of pleasure that you could ever find in any of the best carnivals.

    Should there be anyone who has never attended any such carnivals, he does not 2know how fully he can enjoy himself at them. Let him ask someone who has, or, better still, let him come directly to Oakley Boulevard and Rice Street this very evening. The carnival is open every evening from 6 to 12; also Saturdays and Sundays. The carnival has already begun. It will end October 5.

    [Translator's note. The organizer of this carnival (name not given in advertisement) was the St. Nicholas Church.]

    Attention, Ukrainians of Chicago and vicinity! First time in Chicago, a Ukrainian carnival, corner Oakley Boulevard and Rice Street, from September 18 to October 5! Countrymen, you have not as ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 c 3, III C
  • Ukraina -- June 27, 1930
    A War Show in Chicago

    Beginning with June 21st, and continuing to the 29th, inclusively, there will be in Chicago, a soldier's parade, at Soldiers Field.

    The participants in the parade, will be the 6th corps of the United States Army, chiefly those, stationed at Fort Sheridan.

    The proceeds from this military holiday, is intended for the widows and orphans of the American soldiers.

    There will be displays of all kinds of arms by the 6th corps. Also participating, are the Jugo-Slavs, Lithuanians, Czechs, Bulgarians, and other nationalities living in Chicago.

    The Ukrainians will have for their head, Dr. Siemens-Siemenovich.

    The time and the hour will be appointed for the Ukrainians, for their military productions. Captain Dr. Siemens-Siemenovich, will be the leader of our lodges.

    Beginning with June 21st, and continuing to the 29th, inclusively, there will be in Chicago, a soldier's parade, at Soldiers Field. The participants in the parade, will be the 6th ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 c 3
  • Ukraina -- August 29, 1930
    The Ukrainian Choir, First Prize

    The 23rd day of August, 1930, will be inscribed not only in the history of the city of Chicago, but also in the history of Ukrainian Song on the American territory, as the day on which the "Ukrainian National Choir," under the direction of Mr. George Benetzky, received an acknowledgement- for the mystical accomplishment of song, first prize over all the other choirs, that took part in this contest.

    There were sixteen choirs in all. It is necessary to note, that the choirs which took part in the contest, were of the best that were preparing for this contest; for the contest being arranged by such a company as The Chicago Daily Tribune, one of the largest newspapers in the world. A common choir was not courageous enough to take part in it. Also, the outside choirs, that took part in the contest, were the choirs that got the first acknowledgement in their cities, and their states, and with those, the "Ukrainian Choir" took a chance in appearing for an exhibition of their talents.

    The contest of all the choirs started at 1:30 P.M., in the "Great Northern Theatre", at 26 West Jackson Boulevard, in the loop.

    The choirs were conposed of 100, 80, and 60 voices respectively. There were mixed 2choirs of male and female voices, and our singers waited impatiently for their turn to come, in order to measure the beauty of the Ukrainian melody with the melodies of other people.

    There were Swedish, German, Russian, Negroes, and many other choirs that appeared there. The Poles, who were supposed to have taken part, did not come. There are about a half million Poles in Chicago, and they have eight choirs. It seems that they did not have enough courage.

    At 4 o'clock, the Ukrainian choir was called, being number thirteen on the roll. Proudly, in good order, and lively stepped on the stage, our singers of both sexes, in their wonderful Ukrainian costumes, forming a pretty semi-circle. The director, Mr. Benetzky, appearing in front, bowed to the public, gave sign to the Ukrainian choir, then, in the beginning, there was to be heard the soft humming of our "Shchedrick", and then, "Oy, na horonci."

    It requires one's being present, in order to understand what impression the Ukrainian melody made on the other choirs. When the Ukrainian choir finished its singing, there were voices heard in the English language, "you Ukrainians are beating all the other choirs by your melody, and your accomplishment". Even then, with some of our Ukrainians, there was hope that our choir would get the first place, 3but the majority of the members of the choir, wanted to go home, not waiting for the result for they did not believe that they could, among those big and old choirs, obtain first place in the contest.

    At 5 o'clock in the afternoon, there appeared on the stage, the experts, the musical judges. They spoke of the practical ability of the choirs, their accomplishments, about their voices, and they said that all the choirs are of the first class, but, one of them has to win the first prize, for it is impossible for them all to get the first place.

    The singers of all the choirs, with great eagerness and not breathing, were waiting for the moment when their number, and name would be announced as Victor, over the rest of the choirs. At last, there appeared Mr. Nobel Cain, who was as an orderly during the contest, and pronounced number thirteen, that of the "Ukrainian National Choir," and according to the resolution of the judges, this "Ukrainian National Choir", has the first place among all the other choirs that took part in the contest, and that this choir should appear on the stage, for there, they will get all the information, regarding the appearance in the musical festival in the evening of the same day at "Soldiers Field."

    Right after this acknowledgement, all the other choirs made a great ovation in honor of our singers and their director.

    4

    The joy of our singers had no end. It was really worth while to be glad. Such events happen rarely in our lives.

    After getting the information, the "Ukrainian Choir," fully satisfied, went home, for again in the evening at 8 o'clock, it must appear in an honorable place in "Soldiers Field," (which contains over 100,000 seats) and only the Ukrainian Choir would sing over the radio, and for the audience, as the victor over all the other choirs.

    After supper, at the restaurant of Mr. Semeniuk, at 7:15 P.M., the Choir left for Soldiers Field," in order to be there by 8 o'clock. When they came to the place, there were thousands of automobiles, and buses, bringing over 10,000 people to see the music "Festival-Evening."

    Every Ukrainian heart rejoiced greatly at the notice that the Ukrainian song, for the first time would be presented in the presence of such a large gathering. (According to the American papers, there were over 150,000 listeners.)

    When the "Ukrainian Choir" appeared on the square, the public at this very moment greeted it with thundering applause, and the ushers led our singers to the place of honor, where an inscription in the English language was seen,- "This place is reserved for those who won the first prize."

    5

    At 8 o'clock, "Soldiers Field" was already over-crowded, and the stream of people had not yet ceased, and it seemed as though the whole city of Chicago wanted to be present at this "Festival."

    The electrical reflectors in several different colors, lighted the square and threw the lights in different directions, so that the large masses of people could be easily seen... On the northern side of "Soldiers Field" were seated all the choirs, numbering 4,000 persons, that had to sing together at the end of the Festival, the "Hallelujah Chorus", from the Messiah, composition of Handel, directed by Mr. Nobel Cain, and in the middle, in a well lighted place, was seated the "Ukrainian National Choir", in Ukrainian costumes....

    The bugle band which consisted of over 1,300 players, opened the program of the "Festival."

    The 23rd day of August, 1930, will be inscribed not only in the history of the city of Chicago, but also in the history of Ukrainian Song on the American ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3
  • Sitch -- September 01, 1930
    Victory of the Ukrainian Chorus

    On August 23 of this year, the Chicago Daily Tribune sponsored a singing contest in which the Ukrainian Chorus under the leadership of Mr. George Benetsky took part. None of the singers nor the leader ever dreamed of winning first prize with their chorus which has a mere thirty-two members.

    We will describe the sequence of the whole contest and all the other points of this unforgettable moment in some future issue. Today, we only want to give our readers the news about the unheard-of influence and wide-spread fame of our name not only in Chicago and the state of Illinois, but in the whole United States as well. The writer of this note was in Marinette, Wisconsin, where on Sunday, two days after the contest, the only subject of conversation was the victory of Ukrainian music over American music.

    On August 23 of this year, the Chicago Daily Tribune sponsored a singing contest in which the Ukrainian Chorus under the leadership of Mr. George Benetsky took part. None of ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3
  • Ukraina -- November 14, 1930
    (Chicago, Ill.) Weekly. Art Exhibition

    The Ukrainian Art Circle in cooperation with the Ukrainian Women's Benevolent Aid Society, will hold an art exhibit, on November 15-16. inclusive, of this year, in the Art Club's quarters, at 2406 W. Chicago Avenue. (Sitch Home).

    The exhibition will be a grand one, with the newest drawings, and objects of fine arts, including also valuable things from our war for liberation in 1918-1920.

    The materials come mostly from the private collection of Mr. Kochan in Joliet, Illinois. Together with all this, there will be the objects that Madam Kochan is bringing into Chicago from Europe in a day or so, for she is on her way home to America.

    Among the objects of the exhibition, there will be an alloted place for Miss O. Kulchitsky's newest art works, the achievement of her own hands, one of these being the personification of our armed forces, starting with the early days of our history and ending with the beginning of the "Sitch Military Athletic Organization" in the year 1918.

    We must state here, that the fine arts was a neglected field on part of our people. Because of the continuous wars, our people had to wage against their enemies, there was not much time to cultivate our own arts.

    2

    That is why we should praise those, that among us, have undertaken such a prominent task as the Art Exhibition.

    We should also rejoice because our younger generation and particularly the women, testify to the fact that they have the sence of beauty and the fondness for such fine things as our national art.

    Also our songs, that win first prize everywhere and our historical music (kobza) and dances, were given a proper place in our Art Exhibition at the Museum.

    The Ukrainian Art Circle in conjunction with the Women's Benevolent Aid Society--appeals to the Ukrainians of Chicago to visit the Art Exhibit on the 15th and 16th of this month.

    The Ukrainian Art Circle in cooperation with the Ukrainian Women's Benevolent Aid Society, will hold an art exhibit, on November 15-16. inclusive, of this year, in the Art Club's quarters, ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 b, II B 1 c 3
  • Ukrainian Youth -- October 07, 1934
    Miss Century of Progress

    Last Saturday Sept. 29, 1934 at the Century of Progress Miss Marie Lubas, "Miss Ukraine 1933", was one of the twenty seven girls picked out of some three hundred and some contestants for the title of Miss Century of Progress. She is representing the Ukrainian Nationality in the race.

    One of these twenty seven girls shall be picked as Miss Century of Progress, and the picking shall not be by a judge but by popular vote. The limited time for voting is between Sept. 30 and Oct. 8, inclusive. Therefore if you are at the Fair don't forget to ask for a ballot as you walk in and cast, a vote for Marie Lubas, because I'm sure if you all do that the Miss Century of Progress will be a Ukrainian girl....

    Last Saturday Sept. 29, 1934 at the Century of Progress Miss Marie Lubas, "Miss Ukraine 1933", was one of the twenty seven girls picked out of some three hundred and ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 c 3
  • Ukrainian Youth -- October 07, 1934
    Ukrainian Day at the Fair Today

    Today is a very important day to all Ukrainians in Chicago and vicinity for it is "Ukrainian Day" at the Century of Progress.

    The day's affair will begin with an enormous parade which will originate at the Fourteenth Street Entrance (14 St. Entrance) at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. The parade will be escorted by the The Century of Progress Band, and the Participants of the parade will be: The Aoramenko Dancers, the choral group, speakers, soloists, and everybody who will attend the affair. As the parade will progress thru the Fair Grounds it shall go down and thru the Avenue of Flags to the Sixteenth Street Bridge and to the site of the affair. The Court of States.

    Promptly at 3 P.M. a beautiful program will start, which will inspire you with admiration as you witness the picturesque folk dances and hear the national song sung by the chorus. The program shall also have in its body solos, speeches by distinguished personages and a variety of suprising entertainment. The admission to The Court of States is free, but there will also be reserved seats for anyone who wants them. The price of the reserved seats will be fifty cents (50ยข) and one dollar ($1.00).

    2

    Today is "Ukrainian Day" at the Fair so let us all go like loyal Ukrainians, to show everybody that there is such people as "The Ukrainians" and that there are plenty of them. After all it happens once in a century and this is our last chance to see the Fair.

    It is sponsored by Dr. M. Siemens, therefore Dr. Siemens and The U.Y.O.A. Weekly cordially invite you to attend this spectacular Ukrainian Day at the Century of Progress so thank you and adios until we meet at "The Court of States" this afternoon.

    Today is a very important day to all Ukrainians in Chicago and vicinity for it is "Ukrainian Day" at the Century of Progress. The day's affair will begin with an ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 c 3
  • First All-Slavic Singing Festival -- December 09, 1934
    Souvenir Program

    The Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago. (p. 88)

    The story of the Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago is the story of one of the greatest capella choruses in America. Since its organization in 1928, this chorus has marched forward and is an inspiration to all those who find obstacles only an incentive to their removal, - a chorus of men and women who find their courage renewed by song, and who 2face the future unflinchingly, refusing to admit there is such a thing as the impossible.

    For taking the initiative in organizing the chorus, Mrs. Alice Howard, an American of keen artistic sense, is to be highly credited. Knowing that Ukrainians excel in the field of song, she herself appealed to Ukrainian-Americans of Chicago and met a hearty response in the persons of George Benetzky, a great conductor, thirty talented singers, and a benevolent patron, Mr. Conrad Sawiak. Its march started December 28, 1930, in full native costume in gay color and proud triumph in the first official concert appearance at the Civic Theatre. Presenting a comprehensive program of selected folk material from Ukraine with the purest harmony of their capella voices, it at once enchanted a large audience. Since this official introduction of the music world, every succeeding appearance of the Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago added to its capabilities and marked a new step in choral achievement.

    3

    In events of major importance such as the Chicagoland Music Festival, given by 35 newspapers with the Chicago Daily Tribune leading, it had participated, taking twice the first prize in the mixed choral contests for five states, at the 1930 and 1931 fetes respectively. No other chorus in America ever repeated a like tremendous victory. Leading American music critics, hearing the Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago, wrote that its successes were not at all surprising.

    In its musical tours in Chicagoland, the Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago was called a "hit" and praised very highly. In the great Carnival of Nations Finals of 1931 and 1932, respectively, the Chicago Daily News featured the chorus especially.

    Upon invitation of the Civic Music Association, the chorus sang at the Civic Auditorium in La Porte, Ind., and at the High School Auditorium in Sheboygan, Wis. Both of these concerts were very successful.

    4

    The Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago gave a concert last year at the Studebaker Theatre, for which it was highly praised; also its appearance at the Century of Progress Exposition won the admiration of everyone of Ukrainian art.

    In addition to its concert appearances, the Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago, upon invitation of the National Broadcasting Company, presented numerous most delightful programs over the air.

    The genius of the choral director, George Benetzky, the virtuosity of his choral group, the wealth of song contributed by the Ukrainian peasant, are items of comment by music critics.

    Representing standards highly professional, the Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago during the past six years established itself in community choral singing and as one of the finest choruses helped usher in a 5new dawn in music, especially in Chicago. Absorbed into our standardizing American life, it has both delighted and acquainted American music lovers with something that is new in song, both in technique and in theme.

    Some of the remarks being quoted by our music critics:

    "There is nothing but praise to write, nothing but pleasant memories to treasure of the Ukrainian chorus and its remarkably talented director, George Benetzky. The Ukrainians delight the ear as well as the eye. The ear is charmed by the quality of their united and harmonious tone and caressed by the pitch perfection of this a capella singing - the eye enjoys the picturesqueness and warm coloring of the costumes."

    Herman Devries, Chicago Evening American, Jan. 23, 1933.

    "In its balance and discipline, as in its tone quality, it is one of 6the best choruses to be heard in America. And it sings under the leadership of a capella and imaginative conductor, George Benetzky."

    Eugene Stinson, Chicago Daily News, Jan. 23, 1933.

    "Ukrainian Chorus is uncommonly skilled in the art of song. Whether their voices are in full strength or whether they go into the peculiar buzzing hum which is one of their effects, they are always musical, with many devices of expressive contrast, but always with the main line of the composition in mind."

    Edward Moore, Chicago Daily Tribune, Jan. 23, 1933.

    "Mr. Benetzky literally "played on the chorus" as on a magnificent organ."

    Forbes Julian, La Porte Herald Argus.

    7

    The present officers are Simon Domanchuk, President; Theodore Katamay, vice President; Marie Witarski, Secretary; Marie Lubas, Assistant Secretary; William Mick, Recording Secretary; Sophie Kalpak, Treasurer, and Steven Motalo, Advertising Manager.

    The Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago. (p. 88) The story of the Ukrainian Chorus of Chicago is the story of one of the greatest capella choruses in America. Since its organization ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3, II A 3 b
  • Sichovi Visty -- [Unknown date]
    The Chicago Ukrainians Give Grand Finale Concert at Exposition Chicago Siege Executive Office is Host to Most Famous Ukrainian Choir Whose Brilliant Concert Entertains Chicago Public

    Ukrainians from every nook of America write articles to newspapers telling the world about their local activities, relations with their homeland, etc. In short, everyday we are learning about some of their worthwhile activities from many parts of this country.

    In Chicago, as elsewhere, our people are also earnest workers in many branches of various activities, including national. Yet, curious enough, the newspapers do not mention anything about Chicago at all. In view of this fact, I was determined to write something about the Ukrainian concert 2which took place in Chicago, wherein the local Siege was host to the famous Ukrainian Choirs; therefore, in a measure the Chicago Ukrainians directly and indirectly contributed to the entertainment of different nationalities of Chicago, who were present at the concert. Here everybody had an opportunity to enjoy the real beauty of Ukrainian melodies and dances.

    Chicago, both this year and last year, presented a small exhibition, Pageant of Progress Exposition. Of course, at this exposition practically all nationalities and all kinds of products were represented. The exposition this year was quite favorable to the Ukrainians, and the Chicago Ukrainians were certain to take advantage of it.

    The exposition opened on July 29, with a grand pageant of numerous musical bands and demonstrations of all sorts of products. Our Chicago Siege band, 3composed of forty players, with its conductor John Barabash, was one of those numerous bands. "Ukrainian Band," both in Ukrainian and English, was inscribed on its large drum. They made such a good appearance, that they surely must have attracted the attention of the crowd of a million people standing packed on both sides of the streets, because as our band passed there were ceaseless ovations and cheers from the crowd. This was one of the first grand and successful appearances of our Siege Band which will have a lasting impression on a million inhabitants of Chicago. This was an appearance which informed the American public that there are Ukrainians living in Chicago. In a great measure we have John Barabash, our young Siege Band conductor to thank for all this.

    The exposition, as mentioned above began on July 29, and was to end August 13. The Ukrainians were invited to give their concert on the last day. No one ever dreamed of such an opportunity. One week had already passed and 4no one knew anything about it; naturally, no one was interested any further, to any considerable extent, with the exposition. But as the second week commenced, the incredible good news was received from the Exposition Committee that the Chicago Ukrainians had been selected to give the Grand Finale Concert on the last day of the Exposition.

    Within a few hours the Ukrainian Concert Committee got together, discussed the matter, and decided on concert numbers.

    The leading members of this Committee were the following: John Barabash, conductor of the Ukrainian Siege Band; Rev. Wasyl Stetsiuk, conductor of the Siege male choir; Professor T. Choptiak, conductor of the Lysenko choir; R. I. Smook; and Mr. Aschenko, instructor of the Unrainian national dances.

    From that time on the tireless work began. Both choirs rehearsed most 5diligently, and the girls also wanted to profit by the opportunity so they were glad to learn Ukrainian group dances. All rehearsals and preparations for the concert took place at the Church Hall, at Oakley and Rice St. The culminating point of all those rehearsals of the band, choirs, etc., was reached on the day of the concert.

    The concert was announced in all the American newspapers in Chicago. And curious enough, the Poles were very much surprised. They wondered why the Ukrainians were chosen, and most likely they sent their spies to the concert.

    Critics, reporters of foreign newspapers, as well as many Ukrainians were present at the concert.

    William Hale Thompson, Mayor of Chicago, and one of the members of the 6Exposition Committee, because of the lack of seats in the hall were obliged to listen to the concert over the radio.

    Now I wish to lay aside the description of the audience and the concert hall, and will start first, so to speak, with a slight criticism of the musical numbers.

    The first number was the overture "Lustspiel" by Keller Bello. The parting of the curtain disclosed a beautiful tableau of a Ukrainian Siege band wearing blue uniforms.

    R. Smook, the prompter, introduced the Ukrainian Band and its conductor John Barabash, and announced the first number of the program. They were given a real welcome by a lengthy ovation.

    As the conductor raised his baton such silence prevailed that the drop of a pin could have been heard. The beautiful "Lustspiel" was played with 7minute precision.

    Everyone, who has ever heard the piece and understands music, discovered that the men in the Ukrainian Band, not only play skillfully, but also with their whole hearts and souls.

    The second part of the first number was the serenade "The Cupid Charms." The third part, "Collection of Ukrainian Melodies," by John Barabash, was excellently played by the band.

    The second number was a song, the "Bandoora," by H. Davidovsky. Another beautiful tableau was then presented, composed of members of M. Lyssenko's mixed choir.

    8

    Then followed the choir of T. Choptiak. Both choirs had to sing encores. Miss Mary Vinyarsky deserves honorable mention because of her very charming soprano voice.

    Third number: "Wedding of the Winds," music by J. T. Hall. Also "Ukrainian Bazaar Songs," by John Barabash.

    After a short intermission the Ukrainian Band appeared again. The audience was so pleased with the band that it seemed that it could not want anything better, yet this band is comprised mostly of persons from the laboring class.

    In the last part of the third number the Ukrainian Band played Ukrainian compositions exclusively. This deviation from American music was a real treat to the audience. The band was called back over and over; the enthusiastic audience hardly knew when to stop its ovations.

    9

    The fourth number: "Vetchernitsi" (Evening Entertainment), music by R. T. Nischinsky. The very appearance of the self-confident M. Lyssenko's mixed choir was a certain guarantee that this number would be a success. This it was, although in minor details there was still room for improvement. But if the fact that the choirs also consist of the working class is taken into consideration, then one is bound to marvel at how it was possible for these amateurs to render their numbers as well as they did.

    Another attraction was the young ladies in Ukrainian national costumes. Several of the girls were so immaculately dressed that they looked like a real tableau. Miss Olga Motsio was one of them. It looked as if those girls had come from Ukrainia to entertain the audience here, and to show American women how beautifully they dress in Ukrainia.

    The fifth number: Mr. and Mrs. Aschenko presented a short dialogue and 10excerpts from songs. It was not bad, but it seems that it would have been much better if it had been omitted entirely.

    The sixth number: The popular song "Palley," musical master-piece of T. Vorobkevich. When the curtain was drawn, the public witnessed a slightly different treat, a male choir. This was a Siege choir and its conductor Rev. Wasyl Stetsiuk, a sincere, zealous hard worker. The choir, under his direction was being swayed with the rapidity of lightning, yet so smoothly and so harmoniously. The American public has never seen a better choir, a choir so well-disciplined and with such seriousness in their hearts for the work at hand. This number, of all the choir numbers, was the most successful. This choir was a living testimonial of the hard work of Rev. W. Stetsiuk. All we have to say, with reference to this Siege male choir, is to hope that they will continue to attend their rehearsals in the future under their very able conductor Rev. W. Stetsiuk.

    11

    The seventh number: Solo and group dances were preceded by a song by a group of girls. The dances were another covetous treat for the audience. Boys and girls poured on the stage from the right and left sides formed couples, ranks, and files. With very skillful musicians the ballets came out exceptionally well.

    The group was followed by solo dances. This was something positively new for the audience. The following took part in it: Mr. Aschenko, instructor and manager of the dancing of the program; Stephen Musiychuk, true cossack and sincere worker in the Siege Organization; M. Tokarevich; D. Zabolotsky; Luke Stachursky. They all performed their parts very well, yet Mr. Aschenko, as could be expected, superseded them all. He is a superb ballet master and acrobatic dancer, and naturally, he would be master of the situation.

    Of all the girls who danced exceptionally well, several of them deserve 12special press attention. Among those were the following: A. Voos, O. Motsio, Mrs. M. Musiychuk, Catherine Kosovich, Mary Vinyarsky, S. Koptynsky, and Kryvetsky.

    The eighth number: The overture "Superbe," by Dalbey, was played by the band as well as their preceding pieces.

    For the grand finale the Ukrainian Band played the American and Ukrainian national anthems.

    We are sure that this concert will never be forgotten by the American audience and still more so by the Ukrainians who were present.

    Two days have passed since the grand fete, after which, very desirable results have followed. The secretary of the Exposition sent an official letter to our Ukrainian Concert Committee in which, among other things, 13he stated that the Concert given by the Ukrainians was the most sensational event of the whole Exposition. The letter was signed by Mayor William Hale Thompson and his secretary.

    The day after this letter was received, special delegates sent by the Exposition executives, came to the Ukrainian Concert Committee and asked them to repeat the concert once more. However, they declined the offer due to some important reason that intervened.

    It seems that it is useless to comment any further on the fact that the Chicago Ukrainians did more by that one concert, than they could by many protests against their political enemies.

    And now, for the grand success of this concert, we should give thanks to John Barbabash, conductor of the Ukrainian Band, and to the chairman of the Ukrainian Concert Committee.

    14

    Our next obligation is to Rev. Wasyl Stetsiuk, Prof. T. Choptiak, and ballet master Aschenko and his wife. They all co-operated very well.

    We should also thank the subordinates who answered the call of their conductors with such enthusiasm. Thanks for their sincerely impersonal interest in the concert's success.

    Would to God that we continue to be as successful in the future.

    Andreyko.

    Ukrainians from every nook of America write articles to newspapers telling the world about their local activities, relations with their homeland, etc. In short, everyday we are learning about some ...

    Ukrainian
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 c 1, I C, II B 1 a, III E, I C