The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Ukraina -- August 09, 1917
    Let Us Unite!

    Every Chicago lover of song and music, has noticed that recently in Chicago the Ukrainian choruses have been neglected, whereas formerly they enjoyed great popularity, both among our own and other people.

    Just who is to be blamed for this neglect of the Chicago choruses is hard to say, whether it is the directors or the singers.

    There can be various reasons for these misunderstandings, but we must bear in mind that our native songs stand higher than our personal feelings. Everyone knows, what great value music has. It gives to the soul the highest joy. It fills the heart with gladness and content. It makes the people forget their misfortunes and raises them on unseen wings to heights of joy, into invisible yet beautiful regions. Even when it moves us to tears it only cleanses, dignifies and uplifts our souls. No pleasure, no play can compare with music. It makes people finer and more delicate. Music creates peace among men, by inducing them all to the one and same high end.

    Under the influence of music all work becomes lighter and more interesting. People captivated by music become bolder, braver and daring of spirit.

    2

    But there is something still more important than the music alone and that is song. For in the song, with the aid of words, voice, feeling and music there is brought out everything that is within the soul, gladness and sadness. Through the voice every word of the singer flows into the soul of the listener and makes him think, disposes him to melancholy or mirth, as the singer desires.

    In song, just as in a mirror, is found the reflection of all the human life with its misfortunes, joys, sufferings and rejoicings.

    Music and song make people more considerate of the distress of their fellowmen. Should we Ukrainians, the endowed singing nation, abandon these treasures, that other people acquire with much difficulty?

    Are we really unfit and incompetent for group work, to raise the polyphonic art of singing to its really high standard always held by our nation? Do not remain deaf to this invitation, the voice in the wilderness, but let us join the ranks of the participants, and work with the community, thus raising our song to the highest standard of art, for the glory of our native country and for the satisfaction of ourselves, the Chicago Ukrainians.

    Every Chicago lover of song and music, has noticed that recently in Chicago the Ukrainian choruses have been neglected, whereas formerly they enjoyed great popularity, both among our own and ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a
  • Ukraina -- August 01, 1918
    Ukrainian Chorus Offers Services in Cause of Patriotism

    The Ukrainian singing society "Boyan", which led in the singing of thirty different nationalities at the All-American Celebration of the Council of Foreign Language Women at the La Salle hotel on Tuesday, has offered its services for patriotic community singing in any locality, according to an announcement made by Mrs. Constantine Howard, executive secretary of the council.

    The only stipulation made, is that if performances occur in the daytime, the members of the chorus must be compensated for loss of pay through absence from work, and that the national song of Ukrainia must be included in the program.

    Mrs. Stephen Hryniewiecka is the leader of the chorus.

    The Ukrainian singing society "Boyan", which led in the singing of thirty different nationalities at the All-American Celebration of the Council of Foreign Language Women at the La Salle hotel ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, I G
  • Sichovi Visty -- March 15, 1922
    Chicago Siege Branch No. 15 Helps Ukrainian Ex-Soldiers

    For singing Christmas carols, Bohdan Chmelnitsky Siege Branch No. 15, Chicago, Illinois collected $387.11, the Children's branch organized by and collateral with Branch No. 15 collected $100 and the boy's branch also gathered $100. This made a total of $587.11. To this, Mr. N. Navrotsky, financial secretary, added from the general Siege account $7.89 which made a grand total of $600. This sum, Dr. S.K. Hrynevetsky, chief executive of the Siege organization, sent to Dr. Smallstotsky for the Ukrainian ex-soldiers, definitely stating that the sum came exclusively from Bohdan Chmelnitsky Siege Branch No. 15, Chicago, Ill.

    For singing Christmas carols, Bohdan Chmelnitsky Siege Branch No. 15, Chicago, Illinois collected $387.11, the Children's branch organized by and collateral with Branch No. 15 collected $100 and the boy's ...

    Ukrainian
    II D 10, II B 1 a, III B 2, III E
  • Sichovi Visty -- June 01, 1923
    The Latest Affair

    On June 9, for the first time in the world's musical history, and moreover in the history of Ukrainians, there will occur a most important and pleasant incident for us Ukrainians. On that date, the world's largest Ukrainian band, The Ukrainian Sitch Musical Society, will give its first concert on the radio, under the baton of John Barabash and sponsored by M. Zalizniak of Company 12 of Chicago. To enrich the program, there will be a violin solo by Miss Anna Motluk, an eleven-year-old artist and student of John Kobeliak, and a xylophone solo by Mr. F. Zelina. This concert will be an important one because, also our Ukrainian soprano, Mrs. Stephanie Tsymbalist, will sing some solos. She is known from her appearances in Detroit, Michigan, but is not known here. Thus, Americans and others will have an opportunity to hear our Ukrainian nightingale.

    This concert is not going to be an ordinary one; it will be a concert in which thousands, and even millions, of Americans and others will listen to the 2melodies of our native songs, both instrumental and vocal. People especially interested in music will listen to it. That is why we appeal to all Ukrainians, not only of Chicago and its suburbs, but also of all parts of the United States and Canada, to take an interest in this concert and to inform others about it. We especially appeal to those who have radios in their homes not to forget that on Saturday, June 9, 1923, between the hours of 10 and 11 P. M., they will be able to hear the first Ukrainian concert of the famous Sitch band and the soprano soloist, Mrs. Stephanie Tsymbalist, over the Drake Hotel radio station, W P A P.

    The concert program is as follows:

    1. Overture, "Superb"... arr. by Dolby

    2. March, "National Emblem"

    The Band

    3. Violin solo, "Souvenir"

    "The Swan"

    Miss Motluk

    3

    4. Ukrainian Medley in honor of Alexander Koshetz....arr. by Barabash Mrs. Tsymbalist and the Band

    5. Solo, "Ah! Where Is That Flower?".....Nuzamovsky Mrs. Tsymbalist

    6. Xylophone, "Ukrainian Pearls"....arr. by Barabash Mr. Zelina

    [Translator's Note: This article translated because follow-up article did not appear. The issue of Sichovy Visty, July 2, 1923, is missing from the files, and may have carried the follow-up article.]

    On June 9, for the first time in the world's musical history, and moreover in the history of Ukrainians, there will occur a most important and pleasant incident for us ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 2 e, II B 1 a, III B 2, IV
  • Sitch -- April 15, 1925
    Ukrainian Scout Band of Chicago

    During the early part of 1925, the Ukrainian group at Oakley and Rice Streets, organized a band composed of boys from ten to eighteen years of age. The name of the band is "The Ukrainian Scout Band of Chicago." The St. Nicholas Church Parish purchased the instruments, which cost nearly two thousand dollars. The idea of organizing a band came from Mr. Stephen Musiychuk and Mr. Simeon Kochy, both well-known as workers in the Ukrainian nationalist, as well as in the musical field. It was not easy to make this idea come to pass.

    With the arrival of Rev. Father F. Tarnawsky, everyone began to cooperate in this work. The band now has fifty members. Its director, John Barabash, director of music in the Harrison High School of Chicago, is known to everyone as the only Ukrainian to hold such a position in the field of music in America. The assistant director is Mr. Stephen Musiychuk; Mr. Simeon Kochy, 2a student of medicine who will shortly become one of our Ukrainian physicians, is business manager.

    The band made its first appearance on Apr. 5, 1925 while Bishop Bohachewsky was in Chicago. The large crowd greatly admired these young musicians, especially because they had studied only three months. The future of the Scout Band looks very promising. The Ukrainians of Chicago are proud to have people among them who know how to carry out enterprises like this. In the near future this band will be known not only in Chicago, but throughout the United States as well.

    During the early part of 1925, the Ukrainian group at Oakley and Rice Streets, organized a band composed of boys from ten to eighteen years of age. The name of ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, III E, III C, II A 1, I C, IV
  • Sitch -- September 20, 1925
    [Program by the Kotliarevsky Musical Society]

    On August 30, 1925, the Kotliarevsky Musical Society gave a concert. This society has been organized only a short time, and its chief aim is to cultivate Ukrainian music and arts among its people.

    The president of this society is Mr. Kochanowsky, and the director Mr. P. Yundak, who is known in Canada as well as he is here. The concert was a success, both in the number of people present and in the program. The concert program was announced by Mr. O. Malitsky, who this year has completed his law studies in Chicago. Mr. Kochanowsky stressed the fact that the society's aim is to deal with matters pertaining only to music and arts, and that it will not mix in any religious or political matters.

    On August 30, 1925, the Kotliarevsky Musical Society gave a concert. This society has been organized only a short time, and its chief aim is to cultivate Ukrainian music and ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, I C
  • Ukraina -- August 08, 1930
    "Ukranian Chicago". "Ukrainian National Choir Appears in Musical Contest"

    The Ukrainian National Choir, under the direction of Yuriy Benetzky, known not only to the Ukrainians, but also to American public in Chicago, through his previous musical entertainments, in concerts, and operas.

    This choir, for the first time in Chicago, has shown a very nice opera, "Kateryna", of M. Arcas, with a great success, which was given two times in succession during one month.

    The Ukrainian National Choir is composed of members, who love to sing, and are under the well-experienced direction of Mr. Benetzky; it sings with real musical accomplishment.

    The aim of this choir, is to get the American people acquainted with our wonderful songs, and in this way, to advertise the Ukrainian name. For this reason, the said choir has decided to appear in the musical contest, which is arranged by the largest American newspaper, The Chicago Daily Tribune.

    In this contest, there take part, choirs, violin orchestras, bugles, and also soloists.

    2

    All choirs must step out with one American song, selected for a choir or orchestra. The Ukrainian National Choir has decided to take part in the contest, to try its luck, and also to let the other people know that there are Ukrainians, who love singing, and who wish to get the palm in the field of song.

    The preliminary appearances, will be held in a Balaban and Katz theatre, (the first class theatre in Chicago), and on August 23rd, on Saturday afternoon, at Soldiers Field, which contains 100,000 seats.

    Other dates, on which the choir will appear, will be stated in the following numbers of Ukrainia.

    We feel that it is our duty, to state the names of the singers, who take part in the contest, for they deserve acknowledgment for their work in the spreading of the Ukrainian song. Also, our Ukrainians in Chicago should help this choir to maintain itself, by their subscriptions, and by so doing, they will show their good will toward the Ukrainian purpose. The Choir is holding its trials in the evening, on Mondays, and Thursdays, at 2048 West Chicago Avenue, and it is composed of the following: There are 32 members in the choir, and 8 members, who financially help to keep the choir in existence. It is necessary, that the Ukrainian business-men, 3and profession-men, get more interested in the choir, and then our song will thunder to us in the American halls, and it will be able to get a permanent place on a radio. But it needs everybody's help.

    The Ukrainian National Choir, under the direction of Yuriy Benetzky, known not only to the Ukrainians, but also to American public in Chicago, through his previous musical entertainments, in concerts, ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a
  • Ukraina -- August 22, 1930
    Chicago Music Festival

    The Ukrainian National choir, under the direction of Mr. George Benetzky, in Chicago, as was already mentioned in one of the previous numbers of Ukrainia, will take part in the "Chicago American Music Festival", which is arranged by The Chicago Daily Tribune, the largest American newspaper. In this festival, will take part, choirs, orchestras, and soloists from five states, namely, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa and Indiana.

    This festival "Chicagoland Music Festival", will be held on Saturday, August 23rd, of this year, at 8 o'clock, in the evening, at Soldiers" Field, Grant Park. The Soldiers' Field contains 100,000 seats. Choirs that will sing there, are composed of even more than 1,000 voices.

    The Ukrainian National choir, is invited to sing there at the end of the festival, jointly, with other choirs, the well-known "Messiah" from the "Halleluyah", by Handel.

    The contest of the choirs will take place also, on Saturday, at 1:30 o'clock in the afternoon, in the "Great Northern Theatre."

    The contest will be held in the presence of the judges only.

    2

    There, the judges will arrange the place for the Ukrainian song also. There, in that theatre, in the presence of the judges, the Ukrainian national choir, by its appearance, will prove that we Ukrainians, have the great treasure- the Song, which makes every Ukrainian heart proud.

    We hope that the singers of the Ukrainian National choir in Chicago, will do their best in order that the Ukrainian Song should get the first prize; for, by this we will secure the honor for the Ukrainian people, and the director of the choir, Mr. Benetzky, will feel fully satisfied, and morally benefitted, having applied much of his time and hard work, not only for this contest, but, in general, to the field of the Ukrainian Song.

    God help the Ukrainian National choir on the 23rd day of August.

    The Ukrainian National choir, under the direction of Mr. George Benetzky, in Chicago, as was already mentioned in one of the previous numbers of Ukrainia, will take part in the ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a
  • Ukraina -- August 29, 1930
    The Ukrainian Choir, First Prize

    The 23rd day of August, 1930, will be inscribed not only in the history of the city of Chicago, but also in the history of Ukrainian Song on the American territory, as the day on which the "Ukrainian National Choir," under the direction of Mr. George Benetzky, received an acknowledgement- for the mystical accomplishment of song, first prize over all the other choirs, that took part in this contest.

    There were sixteen choirs in all. It is necessary to note, that the choirs which took part in the contest, were of the best that were preparing for this contest; for the contest being arranged by such a company as The Chicago Daily Tribune, one of the largest newspapers in the world. A common choir was not courageous enough to take part in it. Also, the outside choirs, that took part in the contest, were the choirs that got the first acknowledgement in their cities, and their states, and with those, the "Ukrainian Choir" took a chance in appearing for an exhibition of their talents.

    The contest of all the choirs started at 1:30 P.M., in the "Great Northern Theatre", at 26 West Jackson Boulevard, in the loop.

    The choirs were conposed of 100, 80, and 60 voices respectively. There were mixed 2choirs of male and female voices, and our singers waited impatiently for their turn to come, in order to measure the beauty of the Ukrainian melody with the melodies of other people.

    There were Swedish, German, Russian, Negroes, and many other choirs that appeared there. The Poles, who were supposed to have taken part, did not come. There are about a half million Poles in Chicago, and they have eight choirs. It seems that they did not have enough courage.

    At 4 o'clock, the Ukrainian choir was called, being number thirteen on the roll. Proudly, in good order, and lively stepped on the stage, our singers of both sexes, in their wonderful Ukrainian costumes, forming a pretty semi-circle. The director, Mr. Benetzky, appearing in front, bowed to the public, gave sign to the Ukrainian choir, then, in the beginning, there was to be heard the soft humming of our "Shchedrick", and then, "Oy, na horonci."

    It requires one's being present, in order to understand what impression the Ukrainian melody made on the other choirs. When the Ukrainian choir finished its singing, there were voices heard in the English language, "you Ukrainians are beating all the other choirs by your melody, and your accomplishment". Even then, with some of our Ukrainians, there was hope that our choir would get the first place, 3but the majority of the members of the choir, wanted to go home, not waiting for the result for they did not believe that they could, among those big and old choirs, obtain first place in the contest.

    At 5 o'clock in the afternoon, there appeared on the stage, the experts, the musical judges. They spoke of the practical ability of the choirs, their accomplishments, about their voices, and they said that all the choirs are of the first class, but, one of them has to win the first prize, for it is impossible for them all to get the first place.

    The singers of all the choirs, with great eagerness and not breathing, were waiting for the moment when their number, and name would be announced as Victor, over the rest of the choirs. At last, there appeared Mr. Nobel Cain, who was as an orderly during the contest, and pronounced number thirteen, that of the "Ukrainian National Choir," and according to the resolution of the judges, this "Ukrainian National Choir", has the first place among all the other choirs that took part in the contest, and that this choir should appear on the stage, for there, they will get all the information, regarding the appearance in the musical festival in the evening of the same day at "Soldiers Field."

    Right after this acknowledgement, all the other choirs made a great ovation in honor of our singers and their director.

    4

    The joy of our singers had no end. It was really worth while to be glad. Such events happen rarely in our lives.

    After getting the information, the "Ukrainian Choir," fully satisfied, went home, for again in the evening at 8 o'clock, it must appear in an honorable place in "Soldiers Field," (which contains over 100,000 seats) and only the Ukrainian Choir would sing over the radio, and for the audience, as the victor over all the other choirs.

    After supper, at the restaurant of Mr. Semeniuk, at 7:15 P.M., the Choir left for Soldiers Field," in order to be there by 8 o'clock. When they came to the place, there were thousands of automobiles, and buses, bringing over 10,000 people to see the music "Festival-Evening."

    Every Ukrainian heart rejoiced greatly at the notice that the Ukrainian song, for the first time would be presented in the presence of such a large gathering. (According to the American papers, there were over 150,000 listeners.)

    When the "Ukrainian Choir" appeared on the square, the public at this very moment greeted it with thundering applause, and the ushers led our singers to the place of honor, where an inscription in the English language was seen,- "This place is reserved for those who won the first prize."

    5

    At 8 o'clock, "Soldiers Field" was already over-crowded, and the stream of people had not yet ceased, and it seemed as though the whole city of Chicago wanted to be present at this "Festival."

    The electrical reflectors in several different colors, lighted the square and threw the lights in different directions, so that the large masses of people could be easily seen... On the northern side of "Soldiers Field" were seated all the choirs, numbering 4,000 persons, that had to sing together at the end of the Festival, the "Hallelujah Chorus", from the Messiah, composition of Handel, directed by Mr. Nobel Cain, and in the middle, in a well lighted place, was seated the "Ukrainian National Choir", in Ukrainian costumes....

    The bugle band which consisted of over 1,300 players, opened the program of the "Festival."

    The 23rd day of August, 1930, will be inscribed not only in the history of the city of Chicago, but also in the history of Ukrainian Song on the American ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3
  • Sitch -- September 01, 1930
    Victory of the Ukrainian Chorus

    On August 23 of this year, the Chicago Daily Tribune sponsored a singing contest in which the Ukrainian Chorus under the leadership of Mr. George Benetsky took part. None of the singers nor the leader ever dreamed of winning first prize with their chorus which has a mere thirty-two members.

    We will describe the sequence of the whole contest and all the other points of this unforgettable moment in some future issue. Today, we only want to give our readers the news about the unheard-of influence and wide-spread fame of our name not only in Chicago and the state of Illinois, but in the whole United States as well. The writer of this note was in Marinette, Wisconsin, where on Sunday, two days after the contest, the only subject of conversation was the victory of Ukrainian music over American music.

    On August 23 of this year, the Chicago Daily Tribune sponsored a singing contest in which the Ukrainian Chorus under the leadership of Mr. George Benetsky took part. None of ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3