The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Russkaya Pochta -- June 16, 1917
    The Resolution of the Russian-Ukrainian Mass-Meeting

    On June 3, 1917 a mass-meeting of the Russian-Ukrainians in Chicago took place and the following resolution was made: Taking into consideration the successfully achieved Russian revolution, we Russian and Ukrainian peasants and workers unanimously resolve: 1) The expression of great thanks to all fighters of Russian liberty and the wish of a successful restoration of peace and order in a free country. 2) The expression of full confidence in the provisionary government, insisting on a victorious outcome of the war in order once and for all, to put an end to militarism. 3) To give to all nationalities inhabiting Russia freedom on the basis of autonomy. 4) The confiscation in favor of the people of all the natural riches and a just distribution of such. 5) The return to the parishioners of all Russian church property appropriated by the bishops. 6) The dismissal of all former tsarist officials, consuls and representatives in America and their replacement by representatives of free Russia. 7) The taking of measures against the Russian clergy, which agitates 2against the new people's government and for the restoration of monarchy in Russia. 8) The confiscation in favor of the people all the property received, as a reward for service to the former tsars. 9) Russia should be a democratic republic. 10) The full prohibition of the sale of liquors. 11) The introduction of obligatory general peoples education. 12) The expression of deep thanks to the American Republic, who has taken under its protection all Russians, who suffered from the former tsaristic regime. The present resolution was worked out after a grand manifestation in honor of liberty and unanimously accepted by the Russian-Ukrainian mass-meeting, and it was resolved to send it immediately to the Russian State Duma. Note: This resolution is an expression of the public opinion of the progressive part of the Russian colony in Chicago, which was hostile to the tsaristic regime. In general one could safely say that almost the whole Russian colony at that time was supporting the provisional government of Kerensky, with the exception of a small number of persons, who belonged to different political movements more to the left, than the government of Kerensky. This resolution reflects the frame of mind of the great majority of Russians in Chicago. N. K.)

    On June 3, 1917 a mass-meeting of the Russian-Ukrainians in Chicago took place and the following resolution was made: Taking into consideration the successfully achieved Russian revolution, we Russian and ...

    Ukrainian
    I E, I A 1 a, I B 1, III H, I G
  • Ukraina -- May 16, 1918
    The Political Aspect of the Ukrainians in America

    The misunderstanding between the benefit associations and the political organizations has no perceptible effect upon the attitude of the Ukrainian immigrants. Why? Because the national spirit is too powerful to be touched by these disagreements. It is noteworthy that the great body of Ukrainians is really in accord with the political organizations, as well as, with the benefit associations. This is true because of the strong bond of national unity. Little misunderstandings, unnoticeable friction, in the realm of politics is not only not harmful, but is on the contrary, unavoidable, very beneficial, and necessary to the life of the organizations. The one main ideal is never lost sight of, viz: Freedom for their own nation. These misunderstandings are due to the fact that some do not have sufficient knowledge and understanding of national questions. The shortcoming of this paper Workman could suitably be its chaos.

    In our opinion this newspaper has neither moral nor social influence upon 2national affairs. The Canadian Ranok is a Presbyterian newspaper. We must admit that in the United States of America we have the Ukrainian-American Workman, a social-religious newspaper, whose "knowledge" and revealed truth are supposed to be grounded on revelation, miracles, and, as the National Freedom sarcastically states, on fortune telling.

    The political policy of all our benevolent society organs, is one: against Germany, against Austria, and sympathy with the Allies and the Ukrainian nation. We do not intend to repeat the strong arguments of our worthy newspapers which have so thoroughly discussed this question. We believe there is not a single Ukrainian in the United States or Canada who would have a different attitude; that is, who would not take sides with the Allies, and the Ukrainians, against Germany and Austria.

    It is a fact that there was no special agitation among the Ukrainians for any one political set-up. Again, the orientations as before so now, is not 3an artificial outcome of a certain political or benefit association. Slight differences in our orientation have occurred as if by means of some unseen force during the last four years. These truths can not be denied by anyone. These are facts and need no further proofs. Yet it would be interesting to explain them.

    First: Why are benefit associations which are somewhat hostile as far as business is concerned, yet, are all bound in a wise, one-front, all-national understanding?

    Secondly: Why do our political national organizations, such as the Federation of the Ukrainians in the United States, and The Ukrainian Council, in Philadelphia, which are mutually great enemies, so opposed to each other just like fire and water, why do they have, we ask, this one and the same beautiful aim, the establishment of national unity among Ukrainians? From our investigation we cast out the socialistic federation party in the United 4States and which we do not acknowledge as an organization at all, and which is, according to our views, a foolishly childish burlesque of socialism.

    The answer to the first as well as to the second question is one. It is the national spirit which, by the law of nature, must evolve. Once its evolution is begun no counter force, no enemy can suppress it.

    Nations are made up of individuals, and they have the same right to freedom as each individual has; therefore, a nation must have a full right to independent freedom and must not be impeded in its evolution.

    But can our nation live in freedom under the control of German iron-clad militarism, when in our own home not we, but a foreign element, shall be the boss? The answer is self-evident. This was the cause to wake up our energetic nation politically with the slogan: "Away with the militarism of the Central Powers ! Away with the control of our nation ! Let freedom of the free nations live!"

    5

    The spirit of this slogan swayed all our newspapers abroad. This attitude of the Ukrainians in the United States is not the result of any agitation, but is just merely the natural outcome of a healthy national spirit.

    The Ukrainian colony in the city of Chicago displayed its energetic national spirit in the preparation of the Ukrainian manifestation, held on May 11, 1918. In the executive committee all the Ukrainian local societies were represented, with the exception of the small group of the socialist party.

    The manifestation of thousands of Ukrainians proved to be a grand success.

    The misunderstanding between the benefit associations and the political organizations has no perceptible effect upon the attitude of the Ukrainian immigrants. Why? Because the national spirit is too powerful to ...

    Ukrainian
    I G, III H, III B 2, I E
  • Ukraina -- May 11, 1919
    To All Subscribers and Readers of the Newspaper Ukraina

    Our newspaper lived through the crisis. For four weeks Ukraina was not published. The shareholders of the Ukrainian Publishing Company, to which our newspaper belongs, are of a strong and reliable character. They said: "We have given a great deal for the newspaper Ukraina already and will give still more for its continuation in Chicago.

    Besides this, a number of the Ukranians in Chicago, although they always boast that they are the best Ukrainians, are against the Ukrainian newspaper.

    Some oppose it because they are blinded by the red Soviet "internationalism" of the Russian Jews - in all cases where liberation work (has been done) by the Ukrainian peasants and workers on their own land. They look through the glasses of the Jews, Russians, Poles, Rumanians, Germans, French, and other nations, but not Ukrainian.

    2

    Our Ukrainian newspaper is very gloomy for these Soviet friends. It voices the sentiment that the Ukrainian people must be their own boss and master on their soil; that the Ukrainian peasant and workingman have the right to keep his own order in his land; that for such as him they seem most fit and most profitable, and will not listen to any stories coming from Warsaw, Paris or Moscow.

    The second group of people in Chicago that oppose our newspaper consists of those who do not yet understand the value of their own newspaper.

    They really are not opposed to the newspaper, but you cannot expect any aid from them for they are indifferent.

    They fear everything, are indifferent to everything. They live only for themselves, yet are not altogether so bad after all.

    3

    There are people in Chicago who understand their obligations toward our nation.

    This group of people organized our newspaper and at all costs are keeping it up.

    In order to overcome the financial difficulties in which our newspaper found itself in the past time, our share owners put upon themselves a voluntary monthly fee.

    Ukraina in Chicago is the only Ukrainian medium in the middle western states which will continue in existence.

    Our newspaper lived through the crisis. For four weeks Ukraina was not published. The shareholders of the Ukrainian Publishing Company, to which our newspaper belongs, are of a strong and ...

    Ukrainian
    II B 2 d 1, I E, I C
  • Ukraina -- August 16, 1919
    How to Aid the Ukrainian Mission in America

    There is no better time than the present for uniting all the national elements, since the Ukrainian delegation came to America. If we all stand united for the same cause, namely, to win full rights for Ukrainia, then the delegation also will be in position to give the answer to the question, what the Ukrainians are fighting for all over the world. Our enemies tried to show our fight for liberation of Ukrainia as Bolshevistic. When we are all united then the horrible falsehoods of the enemies will come to light. It will prove that only a few dozen of Ukrainian people are Bolsheviks, are half-wits and are not fit to think for themselves. The Jewish and the Russian comrades think for them and the red guardians only parrot the phases which they learned from them.

    There is no better time than the present for uniting all the national elements, since the Ukrainian delegation came to America. If we all stand united for the same cause, ...

    Ukrainian
    III H, I E
  • Ukraina -- October 18, 1919
    Here Is No Poland, You Polacks, but the United States of America

    The "Siege" movement which spread among the Ukrainians in Chicago, New York, and throughout the United States through natural irresistible force, restlessly excites the hot-headed Poles. Fortunately, this is not Poland here, but a free democratic country. Here they cannot establish and give a free hand to hoards of rootless Polish state detectives; they cannot establish the Polish "culture" of arson, gibbets and dungeons. But the Polish black hand is present even here. Where it is impossible for them to carry on their savage work with bayonet and dagger there they fight by spying and misinformation.

    The United States federal authorities in New York raided the Siege locale in search for weapons and inciting literature - of course, they did not find anything of the sort, because the Siege members are not anarchists, but Ukrainian patriots who want Ukrainia to be an independent republic, established not on communism, but on a democratic foundation.

    2

    The Ukrainians in the United States are grateful to the federal government for the freedom which they use to good advantage, and the best sign of their gratefulness is the fact that thousands of our boys fought in the World War under the Stars and Stripes of Uncle Sam.

    The federal agent was showing translations from our newspapers Ukraina, Siege News, and other Ukrainian newspapers, which the Polacks purposely mistranslated in order to denounce us. Of course, in those reports the Polish translators twisted around many statements. It is a known fact that the Polack could not live without lying.

    The federal agent visited Ukraina and inquired about the Siege movement among us. Both in Chicago and in New York he obtained the same answer, namely, that the Ukrainian movement is a national independence movement, and that "Sieges" are Ukrainian national athletic associations. He asked whether we drill with weapons. To this we replied that we do not have any permission for it, but that we shall apply for one.

    3

    Without permission we do not have any weapon drill, because it is against the law, and the "Sieges" were, are, and will be loyal and law-abiding citizens of the United States.

    Up to the present time inquiries ended, yet we are sure that it is the Polish black hand which will be restless and will invent something new in order to check the spread of the Siege movement.

    This should only strengthen our work in that direction. It is evident that the Poles are afraid of the Sieges, since they want to stop this movement. Let, therefore, every enlightened Urkrainian, man and woman, join our ranks. Let all the Ukrainians of New York and Chicago and of the whole United States join the Siege association.

    There should be nothing more advantageous to us than public litigation, if it only would come to pass. By the litigation the American public 4would find out who is Paderewski and his bourgeois - clerical clique which now rules Poland. The Americans would find out about all the savageries of the Hallor's (Polish) army, about the atrocities and barbarism of the Huns of the present age. There would come to true light the fake "knighthood" of the Polish bandits, who horribly raged at the defenseless Ukrainian inhabitants of the Eastern Galicia. The bandit stamp would be attached to the Poles once for all, and their so-called "culture" would show itself nothing more than ordinary savage animal brutality.

    Therefore, to work, Siege members! Do not be afraid of the Polish threats in America. The Americans, and not the Poles, rule this country. Our movement when advertised will bring us sympathy from the freedom-loving Yankees.

    The Americans warred for the ideal of freedom.

    5

    The Americans went to the World War in order to free the whole world.

    When the Americans learn about the fact that so many disadvantages came upon Ukrainia, how much the enemies press from all sides against Ukrainia, in order to enslave us, the Americans will be the first ones to say to our national enemies: "Get out of Ukrainia! Hands off from the Ukrainian possessions!"

    Let our enemies rage in their powerless wrath.

    With faith in our proper right to demand what is our own, let us stand under the Siege banner, under the flag of one undivided and independent Ukrainia!

    N. Burlaka.

    The "Siege" movement which spread among the Ukrainians in Chicago, New York, and throughout the United States through natural irresistible force, restlessly excites the hot-headed Poles. Fortunately, this is not ...

    Ukrainian
    I C, I G, III H, I E, III D, III B 2
  • Sichovi Visty -- November 25, 1923
    Practical Social Economy for the Ukrainian Workingman by Dr. O. Nazaruk

    How does social economy appear in theory and in practice? Social or national economy is the study of the aspects and conduct of the domestic life of a nation, or of all nations. This study describes these facts, explains them, and arranges them systematically. On the basis of all this, thinking people come to many important theoretical and practical conclusions that serve the economic and political life of all the people of a nation and country. These results also have great meaning for the domestic life of many individual families, as we shall see later on from practical examples. There are many interpretations of social economy, because it is clear that the capitalist interests himself in this study from one point of view, while the workingman will interest himself in it from another. Actually they are all concerned with this 2study because it binds them together; but every class, and every person in every class, looks at the problems in it from different angles and from different points of view.

    Social economy is a great subject resting on two basic principles of capitalistic theory: personal liberty, and private ownership of property. The first principle implies that it is forbidden to put anyone to work by force; the second means that every person is forbidden to take that which does not belong to him. That is how it appears in theory, but in practice both principles appear differently. Although it is forbidden to force anybody to do a particular kind of work, people are often forced to do menial tasks because of poverty, which means that other work is not available to them as it is to those people who are prosperous. This shows that the second principle also exists for the poorer people only to a limited extent, because frequently a person who does not enjoy personal liberty must, for the sake of the money he will receive, offer his work where he did not wish to give it.

    3

    Workingmen of all nations of the world endure somewhat similar living and working conditions. Only similar, but not identical, because the labor of people who do not live in their own country is done under circumstances far worse than that of those people who live in their own country. The workingman of the suppressed nation is fettered with a double chain: the economic conditions in which he lives, and authority of the country which suppresses his nation. Therefore, such people need twice as much education in order that they might profit a little from the means of modern living which social economy offers them.

    What sort of an outlook is this? Present-day social economy offers the two principles which we have previously considered, and it also has attached to it two more concepts without which it could not exist or else would be altogether different. What are these concepts? They are division of labor, and co-operation. We shall explain the second of these in our "practical social economy column" which will deal with 4matters related to national domestic life.

    First we must give you the meaning of "co-operation". Co-operation is the bond of the workingman to his work, and at the same time to his domestic life. What else does it mean? It means that the workingman is united to the factory or shop where he is employed, united to the country in which he resides. By what means is he thus united? By contracts, by laws or regulations, by custom, by taxes, by organizations, by costs of living, and by many other strings which for the most part he does not realize exist.

    In the study of economy, unity is called freedom, but in practice it turns out differently. There are two kinds of causes that change this unity to one without freedom. One of these causes can be changed for the better rather quickly, which means that the workingman will at once receive more freedom of contract when he is able to understand it. What are they? The economic position of the country in which he is 5living, and its working conditions. That is what we want to do in our work. It is important that this be done for the Ukrainian workingman. What does this work rest on? On a simple but very important foundation: true information about the living conditions and the working conditions in the various cities within the boundaries of Northern America (United States and Canada), including both general and particular trades.

    The trains are now crowded with men who are seeking work. Many people are coming to the United States from Canada because of the economic crisis there, many Ukrainians among them. It may continue like this for some time yet before the crisis is over. All of this requires that the entire Ukrainian press, both here and in Canada, turn its full attention upon the economic situation instead of always writing about politics. We want to initiate this needed change, by writing about the domestic needs of one of the largest cities of the world, Chicago. I have written these facts on the basis of stories told me by the Ukrainian 6workingmen who attended the banquet given in my honor by Company Fifteen of the Sitch Organization. I will write further about the tailors' trade of this city, in which over three hundred Ukrainian people earn their livelihood. I shall write about this trade and about other trades and professions with the following motive: that every Ukrainian workingman came here from his fatherland as a homeless immigrant. Many of them came here, struggling at first--perhaps even hungry for a while--but they had to have some clothing on their backs. That is why we will describe the tailors' trade first. And at the behest of the Sitch Centre, we shall give you a thorough view of the living conditions in this city.

    How does social economy appear in theory and in practice? Social or national economy is the study of the aspects and conduct of the domestic life of a nation, or ...

    Ukrainian
    I E, II B 2 d 1, I D 2 c, II A 2, III G, I H
  • Sitch -- April 15, 1925
    American Libraries

    No country in Europe cares for its libraries as is done here in the United States. Besides, many individuals endow these libraries with large sums of money. The system in these libraries is the same in all and is taught to the librarian in special schools.

    Libraries here usually have three departments: the Reference Department, from which one cannot take out the books; the Circulation Department, and the Children's Department. The last named employs people who are specially prepared to work among children. In addition, the larger libraries have a fourth department--for newspapers and periodicals. The newspapers cannot be taken out, but the periodicals can. In the Reference Department there are special sections for law, medicine, etc.

    Almost every large library has separate collections of foreign books. The public libraries here have books in the Ukrainian language, but only the 2large ones where Ukrainians saw to it that the library purchased them. Usually books in the foreign languages are there uselessly, because it is very seldom that anyone asks for them. The reason for this is that our people do not know that public libraries have Ukrainian literature and that if they demanded it, more would be purchased. The directors of these libraries say that they would employ workers who know foreign languages if the public wished to profit from these collections. Very seldom does anyone ask for these books because, for the past ten years, the few organs of our press occupied their time and space with bickerings and slander which turned the people to disputation instead of education.

    These libraries also have directories of all the important cities of the United States, not only the latest but the older ones as well. From these directories one can find all the addresses of friends and relatives of whom sight has been lost; addresses of night schools where many practical trades are taught free of charge; addresses and information pertaining to various factories and businesses where one might be able to secure a job or to study 3a special trade.

    The libraries also have newspapers, both old and new, of other cities, filed in yearly volumes. Whenever a workingman wishes to move to another city where he does not have any friends, he can use these newspapers, and, by looking through the "Help Wanted" column, secure all the information he desires, which often a friend residing in that city could not supply. It frequently occurs that the workingman has forgotten the name of the ship on which he arrived, and the exact date of its arrival. This information is needed when applying for citizenship papers. In the main libraries one can find many volumes of old daily newspapers that publish the movements of all the ships at the time in question. One should not hesitate because he does not know how to look up what he wants in the library. That is why they have librarians there: to direct him and to show him where to find it and how to find it.

    Whoever might care to, may quickly be convinced that libraries here are 4not only places where one can read comfortably and quietly, but are also places where one can obtain practical information which is very important to life and the future on this earth of the workingman and his children.

    That is why we say to our workingmen, "Utilize the long evenings of your young lives in a useful way! Go to the libraries, seek there and read Ukrainian books! Take your children to the public libraries so that they may become accustomed to the use of the sources of knowledge, which will be to their advantage.

    "Do not lose valuable time by listening to bolshevik agitators or to other critics, for they will not teach you anything. They often do not know anything in any sphere of knowledge. Loud speaking and chiding others do not produce knowledge."

    No country in Europe cares for its libraries as is done here in the United States. Besides, many individuals endow these libraries with large sums of money. The system in ...

    Ukrainian
    I A 3, II B 2 d 3, III A, I C, I E
  • Sitch -- March 15, 1926
    Dr. Vladimir Sieminovich New Chief Editor of the Sitch

    Dr. Vladimir Sieminovich was born on January 4, 1862 in Monastersky (county of Buczacz [in the Ukraine]), the son of a priest. His father's name was Leo, and the maiden name of his mother, Domicelia, was Turkevich. The mother of Dr. Sieminovich is still living; she is ninety-five years of age. Dr. Sieminovich received his early schooling in Buczacz, Berezan, Stanislawow and Lwow. University studies included at first law (two years) at Lwow, and later medicine at the John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland; and after that, one year of medicine at Prague, a year at Vienna, a course at Cracow, one at Berlin, and one in Paris at the Sorbonne. These are the best universities of the world.

    Dr. Sieminovich has lived in America for the past thirty-nine years. At first, he lived in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania, where he edited the 2first Ukrainian newspaper in America, the weekly America. He worked there one year and a half. Then he went to Europe as delegate to Cardinal S. Sembratovich in Lwow, to obtain Ukrainian priests for the Ukrainians of America. He brought back Father Andruchovich. Dr. Sieminovich organized, or helped to organize, many Ukrainian churches in the United States. The first parish in Chicago was organized in a hall above a saloon at Robey and Homer Streets, twenty years ago. Dr. Sieminovich has worked in Chicago for the last thirty-two years. When he first came, there were no Ukrainians here from Galicia, except for a few Lemkos and Carpathian Ukrainians. The first mass in Chicago was celebrated by the Rev. Father G. Tsmaylo Kulchytsky in the hall under the St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, at Noble and Blanche Streets. Dr. Sieminovich took active part in the organizing of the oldest Ukrainian society in Chicago, the Society of George Solomeychuk (later changed to Society of St. Nicholas). This is Branch 106 of the Ukrainian National Association.

    The first Ukrainian church in Chicago was situated at Bickerdike and 3Superior Streets, and was purchased from the Swedes for $5,750. Dr. Sieminovich, along with the late Attorney Yanovich, signed notes for this amount. The above-mentioned amount also included the purchase of a parish house. The same group sold all this property and bought a large tract at Oakley and Rice Streets for the sum of $16,000. This tract included sixteen lots at one thousand dollars per lot, and is the site where the large Ukrainian Church now stands. Before the parish took possession of the property, quarrels began because part of the people wanted the Orthodox Church. Dr. Sieminovich stood for the Catholic Church, whereupon, upon his recommendation, the bank loaned the money without the signature of Mr. Fetzura, who was unwilling to sign because he wanted the Orthodox Church. Dr. Sieminovich vouched for the loan with his own securities and the bank issued the money.

    The first newspaper in Chicago was Ukraina which lasted for a few years. It began during the war. In the first issue of Ukraina, Dr. Sieminovich published the following proclamation: Organize a Ukrainian legion here 4under the guidance of Roosevelt. The first to oppose this were the socialists from the "Federation", even though Dr. Sieminovich was their head. Mr. Semeshko, especially, voiced his opinion against the creation of the legion; he is now some commissar in Russia. He came here from Siberia.

    Besides the Ukraina, the Ranna Zorya (Morning Star) appeared for about a year. It was the organ of the Ukrainian Women's Alliance, which was organized on the same principles as the Ukrainian National Association. The administration was carried out wonderfully by a woman who came from Lwow, and who was the wife f a Croatian, Mr. Zubsich. This paper collapsed because of local misunderstandings. Dr. Sieminovich was also the editor of this paper. Dr. Sieminovich was co-editor for many Ukrainian newspapers in the old country, such as Dilo (Action) and Ukrainske Slove (The Ukrainian Voice). In America, he wrote for the Svoboda (Liberty), America, and the Narodna Vola (National Will). Twice he visited the Ukrainian colonies in Canada, where he organized 5the Ukrainian Red Cross.

    Dr. Sieminovich has a great knowledge of life. One of the basic features of his character is the value which he attributes to women. He says that women are as important to any cause as the soil is to the feeding of people. When we turn due attention on our women, we will find that the idea of our freedom was originated by them generations ago.

    Therefore, we turn our Sitch organ over to the guidance of the worker mentioned above. The Chief Ataman [Hetman] and the Sitch Central Committee could not have made a better selection; they sent to Dr. Sieminovich the deputation to which he pledged his best efforts. He will certainly exert all of his imposing energy and all his knowledge of life, for he has seen many things on this earth and has been through a great deal.

    Dr. Vladimir Sieminovich was born on January 4, 1862 in Monastersky (county of Buczacz [in the Ukraine]), the son of a priest. His father's name was Leo, and the maiden ...

    Ukrainian
    IV, II B 2 d 1, I B 3 b, III B 2, II D 1, III C, III H, V A 1, I C, I E, I K
  • [Interview] -- [Unknown date]
    Interview with: Mr. Nicholas Kalishinski

    The Ukrainian Workers Home whose Chicago branch is located at 2457 West Chicago Avenue is a national organization whose purpose is to spread culture and education among its nationals in the United States. Headquarters of the above organization is in New York City.

    The Chicago branch was organized in 1914 but was reorganized in 1924 under the name of the United Ukrainian Toilers Organization. It is also connected with I. W. O. (International Workers Order) and Ukrainian Women's Educational Society under the name of Lesia Ukraininska. The United Workers Home also extends help and aids its nationals abroad whenever the opportunity arises. The above organization is non-partisan and any Ukrainian, regardless of his political affiliations, may join that organization. They hold their meetings twice a month at the Peoples Auditorium 2457 West Chicago Avenue. Frequently lectures and plays are given by the Ukrainian Workers Home in which the youthful organization of the I. W. O. takes a large part. The membership of the Ukrainian Workers Home is between 350 and 400.

    The Ukrainian Workers Home whose Chicago branch is located at 2457 West Chicago Avenue is a national organization whose purpose is to spread culture and education among its nationals in ...

    Ukrainian
    II D 1, I E, II D 10