The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 16, 1888
    Lincoln Park.

    "The Pearl of Chicago" as Lincoln Park is called, presents itself in a most beautiful setting this summer all the way from North Ave. to Diversy St. and from Clark St. down to the shores of Lake Michigan.

    The most beautiful spot seems to be near the main entrance to the park, where there is a beautiful flower bed seventy-eight feet long and sixty-four feet wide, filled with thousands of different flowers. The gardener who planted it is our countryman, C. J. Strombeck, who has been employed at the park for fourteen years. He has five assistants. More than 200,000 flowers were planted by him this spring. He also takes care of all the greenhouses. Strombeck was born in Linkoping, Sweden. He was graduated at the Swedish Garden Society, Stockholm and arrived in Chicago in 1869.

    "The Pearl of Chicago" as Lincoln Park is called, presents itself in a most beautiful setting this summer all the way from North Ave. to Diversy St. and from Clark ...

    Swedish
    II A 1, V A 2, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 15, 1901
    Swedish Culture in North America

    In the United States there are at present two million people who still speak Swedish. It should be close to the hearts of all friends of the native land to strengthen the sense of unity these immigrants have for the homeland--for its culture and language. Although these people have found a new fatherland in the United States, they are not, however, entirely lost to Sweden as long as they speak the Swedish language and interest themselves in the homeland's destiny. To preserve and strengthen this unity is to make Sweden greater and richer in sons. It is, likewise, winning a new land for Swedish culture.

    While year after year an average of five to six million dollars is sent over to Sweden, hardly anything is done for those of our countrymen here who are in need of help, in spite of the fact that there are one half as many Swedes in America as there are in the homeland. But what we failed to do, they have done. Without our help they have worked, struggled, and 2pressed forward.

    Although they immigrate from Sweden usually with empty hands, the Swedes nearly always become good and useful citizens of their adopted land, and quite a few of them have attained respected stations in life. With their own means they have built Swedish schools, some of which are almost on the level of universities. To the best of their ability, they have sought to strengthen the love for Sweden's language and culture.

    But how much more vigorous this love would be if they knew that those in the homeland understood and assisted in promoting these endeavors? It is in regard to this that we now appeal to the Swedish public.

    In 1860 the Swedes in America established a school which grew to be their finest seat of learning. This school, the Augustana College and Theological Seminary, Rock Island, Illinois, has exerted a powerful influence over the 3Swedish-Americans, and it has been the noblest hearth for the preservation of Swedish in a land far from Sweden. The majority of the teachers in Augustana College received their training in Sweden.

    At first the College's purpose was to train men for the ministry in order to meet the ever-growing demand for clergymen brought about by the influx of Swedish immigrants into the United States. After the shortage of ministers had been taken care of, the institution became of a more general type. New branches and higher courses have been included in the curriculum, and one dares hope now that the institution will develop into a real university.

    However, to collect the funds which are needed for this purpose requires energy and effort, as well as the impulse to start it. But from where shall this impulse come?

    4

    Would it not be most proper that the impulse should come from the old fatherland, which would thus prove that it has not forgotten those in America who have preserved their love for Sweden, its language, and its culture?

    Certainly, nothing could tighten better the common tie between the old and the new Sweden than a contribution from Sweden for the Swedish-American College. Such attitude on the part of the homeland would be invaluable to the preservation of the Swedish language abroad.

    Indications are that the solution to the problem is at hand. A movement has been started in Sweden to raise an endowment fund of 100,000 crowns. This is to be supplemented by a fund of $60,000. to be raised in America. With this fund three professorships will be created at Augustana College.

    One of the professorships should be in Natural Science, in recognition of the services of Linnaeus and Berzelius; another in Church History, 5and a third in Scandinavian Languages, with special emphasis on Swedish. The last mentioned professorship is to be called the "Oscar II Professorship in Northern Languages." This arrangement would strongly emphasize the Swedish character of the university and permanently serve to strengthen the ties between the new homeland and the old.

    The initiative for this movement in Sweden was taken by a number of Sweden's foremost leaders in various branches of cultural development.

    In the United States there are at present two million people who still speak Swedish. It should be close to the hearts of all friends of the native land to ...

    Swedish
    I A 2 d, II B 2 f, I A 1 b, V A 2, III A, III C, III G, III H
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 23, 1903
    Maid or Factory Girl (Editorial)

    When the young women of the working class come to this country at the age when they have to earn their own living, the question often arises, "Which is better, to take a position as a maid in some home, or to seek work in a factory?" If the girl works in a factory, she is able to live at home, or together with some other girl, or alone, wherever she wants. She has her steady wages, and her definite time off, about which nobody can make rules. If she takes a position as a maid, she has a safe place in which to live, and she need not worry about the food question. On the other hand, she is occupied from early morning until late at night with hardly a Sunday free.

    The time off and the prospect of being able to have her own things at home, and being on her own, as it were, will often be the determining factor; the girl decides upon the factory job. But the question arises in every case as to whether the choice were prudent.

    2

    The factory girl is able to live at home, or wherever she chooses. Perhaps at the home she prefers, the rent is too high, and that means as a rule, that she must live in a less desirable locality than she could have had if she had chosen employment as a maid. Then the question arises how to divide the money she is earning between food and clothes. She may save on her food bill; nobody will be able to tell what she is eating, yet the health of the girl is often in peril. If the body does not receive the needed food elements, it cannot produce strength and health as required to enable the girl to enjoy her life. In addition, the monotonous work in the factory does not particularly serve to increase health, and the impure air and diseased fellow-workers in the factory may weigh the scale further against health. No wonder, then that these factory girls look sick and worn, in spite of free evenings and Sundays.

    The time off may often work in the very opposite direction to that which is helpful. The desire to go out evenings is strong, nights awake follow, and may draw consequences far beyond the pale face and the weary body.

    3

    During years of youth, the desire is strong for pleasure. Matters are taken lightly, partly on account of innocence, and partly on account of lack of experience. Youth has not learned what sad consequences may ensue from that which at the moment seemed pleasant. The full responsibility for behavior and manner of living is placed upon the shoulders of the young woman; there being no thoughtful lady of the manor to place restraint on her activities, nobody to persuade her to abstain from the type of pastime which may have consequences detrimental to the girl mentally, morally, and physically, as well.

    It is of the greatest importance for the individual to have a clear conscience, light heart, if he is to enjoy a jolly good time. The factory girl is far more in danger of losing the capacity for true joyfulness than is the maid. Not only because the former is too eager and hasty in seeking diversion without discretion, but also because she is less strong, and because the very nature of her work is more wearing and nerve-racking. It is far more true than that of the latter, 4because in itself the work in the factory may be easier. The reason for this is that factory work is monotonous; it carries little or no responsibility with it; it is mechanical. The work of the maid, on the other hand, is diversified; the maid needs to think and plan before she acts, and this is the factor which contributes most to the feeling of joy in working. It is the factor which marks the line between the higher type of work, which requires the human touch, and the lower, the merely mechanical type of work. A factory girl may be replaced by some other factory girl at any time; the girl is merely a part of the great factory machinery.

    Upon the ability of the maid, on the other hand, rests the well being of a whole household.

    It is true that only recently, since the number of girls applying for the positions of maid became less, has this fact of the great importance of a well qualified maid become fully recognized. Experiences with less capable maids have opened the eyes of the employers, and now the time has come for the maid to attain honor and dignity.

    5

    We urge the thoughtful young women, who are at the point of choosing between the two alternatives, that of the position as maid, or that of the factory worker, to weigh carefully the various pros and cons. On the one hand the factory girl's monotonous work, and her independence outside of working hours. On the other, the maid's healthier work, and her greater security.

    Not always do people find the greatest joy in living who seem to have the greatest opportunities. It is true, the maid has but little time off to do as she pleases, but then it is not at all a matter of course that her time at work may not be pleasant. There are two ways of working; a person may be the master of his work, or he may be its slave. The servant who fulfills one task after the other without complaining may find far greater joy in living than the lady of the house who merely has "freedom".

    It is not our intention, of course, to imply that the working day for the maid is not too long in many cases. Yet, this fact ought not scare our girls to such extent that for this fact alone they should turn away from the life of the maid and take up that of the factory girl.

    When the young women of the working class come to this country at the age when they have to earn their own living, the question often arises, "Which is better, ...

    Swedish
    I H, I B 3 c, V A 2, III G, I M
  • Svenska Nyheter -- July 21, 1903
    [Back from the Diamond Fields]

    Diamantina, Brazil has been visited by H. P. Anderson and Johan Sundt. Mr. Anderson was one of the earliest and most successful gold diggers in Nome, Alaska,...where he acquired great wealth. He is widely known as a capable and keen gold miner, and for this reason he was selected by the Brazil Diamond, Gold, and Developing Company to inspect the property owned by the Company in Diamantina with respect to finding of gold there. Mr. Sundt, who had obtained option on the land in question, accompanied Mr. Anderson on the trip...The two have now returned to Chicago. Mr. Sundt declared himself completely satisfied with the results of their investigations. Mr. Anderson said that the trip had been very interesting, and that he is much pleased with what he has seen. He added: "The Scandinavians obtained the best in Klondike and in Nome, and now it seems as if they are to get the best also in Diamantina."

    Diamantina, Brazil has been visited by H. P. Anderson and Johan Sundt. Mr. Anderson was one of the earliest and most successful gold diggers in Nome, Alaska,...where he acquired great ...

    Swedish
    V A 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- April 19, 1904
    Swedish-American Portrait Gallery: Otto Cederwall by Algot E. Strand

    In the list of members of the committee from the various wards, who were appointed to work for the election of Charles S. Deneen for governor, we noted two Swedish names, John A. Linn and Otto Cederwall. The former is so well-known among the Swedish-Americans as a politician of long standing and local power, that there is no need for a discussion of his qualifications here. The member from Ward 33, Otto Cederwall, on the other hand, we take pleasure in presenting to our readers.

    Membership on a committee such as the one mentioned is, of course, in itself important; it shows that the ward organization has confidence in the man. This circumstance alone would not have been sufficient, however, to induce us to enter Mr. Cederwall in our portrait gallery. We enter him because we are convinced that the public will find him, within a short time, in more 2important functions in the arena of local politics. In our opinion there is, to begin with, excellent material in Mr. Cederwall for a good alderman or county commissioner. Within his ward he is....well-known as a mar of honesty, reliability, and sound business principles. These attributes have made him well-liked in his ward and have created confidence in him among those who have had business dealings with him.

    Mr. Cederwall has never sought public office, and he will surely be surprised when he learns that Svenska Nyheter considers him suitable material for a candidate. Our intention is simply to have the attention of our compatriots called to the man.

    Whatever one may think about the higher schools of learning in Sweden, one fact remains; he who has studied for some years at one of those schools will carry with him into life a certain something in his favor, which is missing in those who did not have the privilege. The discipline exerted by the fellow students, the influence of the teachers and of the surroundings as a 3whole, contribute in this respect, as does also the fact that the people as a whole look up to those who frequent the higher schools.

    A conversation with Otto Cederwall will soon give evidence of his education. He was born in Gothenburg on November 1, 1864, and will thus be forty years old this fall. His father was a merchant. Having graduated from the higher schools, Cederwall obtained a position in the office of the White Star line and remained there for four years. Being in constant touch with returning Swedish-Americans and American tourists, it was hardly to be wondered at that the young man should wish to see for himself the great country across the ocean, of which so much that seemed pleasant had been told him. Consequently he.....emigrated to New York in 1885.....Joining the great current of Swedish immigrants, be continued to Chicago where he soon got a position at Knute Nelson's Clothing Store on Chicago Avenue, and remained with that company for one year. He was anxious, however, to see more of the country and started out for the West, landing in San Francisco where he worked for two yeans with the firm of Lachman and Company....

    4

    In 1888 he returned to Chicago where he opened a buffet in Grand Crossing....It is the finest of its kind in the place....because Mr. Cederwall gave the noisy element to understand that he did not want its business. Consequently, his place is always orderly and clean....In the year 1896 Mr. Cederwall married Miss Annie Broberg....He is a member of Svithiod, Hilding Lodge No. 9; Grand Crossing Turner Verein; Baltic Society of Grand Crossing; Sweaish Glee Club....During the year of famine in Swedish Norrland, Rev. Svanback, J. R. Pierson, and Otto Cederwall formed a subcommittee for the collection of money for the sufferers. The committee collected more than $300 which was added to The Laily News' fund.

    During the past ten years, Mr. Cederwall has taken active part in politics. As will be realized from what we said at the beginning of this article, he is a regular and unswerving Republican.

    By his faithful character, his pleasant ways, his honesty in business, his 5personal magnetism, his liberality and his friendliness, Mr. Cederwall has won a large circle of friends who will be sure to agree with what we have stated about him in this article.

    In the list of members of the committee from the various wards, who were appointed to work for the election of Charles S. Deneen for governor, we noted two Swedish ...

    Swedish
    I F 5, II B 2 d 1, I D 1 b, II D 10, V A 2, III H, I C, IV
  • Svenska Nyheter -- May 24, 1904
    Swedish-American Portrait Gallery Anders Edward Anderson

    When a Swedish-American attains extraordinary success here in this land of tough competition, nobody is more glad to hear about it than your editor and publisher. We are glad for the individual's sake, and also because we feel that his achievement reflects credit on the Swedish race.

    The young man we are going to present today cannot be said to have been born with a silver spoon in his mouth, but he belongs to the class of men who possess the magic touch of Midas, everything they lay their hands on being transformed into gold without, however, suffering the unpleasant consequences which overtook that mythical Phrygian king.

    When a man makes an outstanding success of himself in his chosen work, the common run of people is apt to cry, "Luck!" Maybe so. But certainly luck directed by concentrated energy and will power, good judgment and a thorough understanding of the factors which affect one's business.

    2

    The name Anders Edward Anderson is as Swedish as can be, and the man himself takes pride in his nationality, unlike some upstarts who become Americanized to such an extent that they even forget their mother tongue, or at least pretend to have forgotten it. Yes, Anders Anderson is a Swede, and proud of it, and this in spite of the fact that 95 per cent of the people with whom he does business are of nationalities other than Swedish.

    Some twenty years ago, there were few people in the southern part of Sweden who did not know or had not heard about the building contractor Anderson. This widely known and popular person was the father of the man we have been talking about, and on his farm, in Skane Tranas, Anders Edward Anderson was born, January 11, 1866. Skane Tranas is located not far from Ystad, and in that city the photograph which is reproduced on this page was taken when Mr. Anderson, a couple of years ago, visited the old home.

    The contractor, Anderson's father, did most of the construction work on the Piper estate and other large estates belonging to the nobles of Skane; both he and his sons thus had the opportunity to observe the aristocracy at close 3range, and acquired a sincere disdain for the same. His utter contempt for the aristocratic bureaucracy, which at that time was prevalent in Skane, probably made Anderson what he is today, a democrat, a democrat in the Swedish meaning of the word.

    In 1889 Anderson decided to try his wings and set out for America. He worked first on a farm in McHenry County, Illinois, but soon tired of that, and went to Chicago. Here he went to work in the building trade, and after some time he managed to put over a couple of real estate deals, which netted him a few hundred dollars. This was the turning point in Anderson's life. He decided to make real estate his field, and with a persistence typical of the sons of Skane, he has stuck to this business, which has brought him success and proved so profitable that he is today the biggest Swedish property owner in Chicago. He has discontinued the commission end of the business, and is now buying and selling exclusively for his own account.

    To start this business with two empty hands and build it up to its present status requires personal qualities of high order, not merely luck. A great Swede once said that "the people of the North possess inborn possibilities, 4greater and of a wider range than those of most other races, but the inner warmth necessary to ripen the latent seed to complete fruition is lacking." However, this deficiency in the Northerner is often remedied when he is transplanted to this country, and comes under the influence of the restless activity which prevails here, and particularly if he has within him that priceless Swedish heritage, the genuine steel of the soul, which emerges from misfortune and suffering ever sharp and untarnished.

    That is how Anders Anderson arrived where he is today. America provided the necessary stimulus for his latent business talent, and we congratulate him on his accomplishment.

    His roomy, well-appointed offices in suites 208, 209, and 210 of the Unity Building are dignified and quiet; business is being transacted without loud talking, and almost the only noise one hears is the busy clicking of typewriters.

    Mr. Anderson claims that he has not had time to get married. He is a member of King Oscar Lodge and Mystic Shrine Medinah Lodge, and is also a 32nd degree 5Mason. As befits a financially independent, unattached bachelor, he makes his home at the comfortable Lexington Hotel, 22nd Street and Michigan Avenue.

    When you leave Mr. Anderson, you carry away with you the memory of a man possessed of an electrifying personality, good humor and plenty of energy.

    When a Swedish-American attains extraordinary success here in this land of tough competition, nobody is more glad to hear about it than your editor and publisher. We are glad for ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, III A, V A 2, I C, IV
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 28, 1904
    To the Scandinavians of Chicago

    Never before have world conditions forced individuals to co-operation, drawn them together, as is the case now, in these days. The weak have to protect themselves against the abuses of the strong, and the lower, underprivileged classes are gradually becoming conscious of the fact that they are potentially many times as strong as the so-called upper classes. The tendency is toward socialism; the demand for municipal ownership, for instance, is a typical sign of the times, a step in the right direction. There are already indications that even the gigantic trusts may soon come under the complete control of the Government, and we will then have all the prerequisites of a paternal form of government, which controls everything and everybody. Switzerland, Australia and New Zealand have been in the lead along this road of progress. Therefore, brother Scandinavians, imbued with that same spirit, let us also get together and build a great Scandinavian People's House, here in Chicago, to serve as our social and political center.

    2

    Scandinavian unity is not a new idea. History teaches us, it must be admitted, that Scandinavianism, as practiced during the 126 years of the Kalmar Union, when the three countries were united under one king, was fraught with misunderstanding and strife. But this was due to the misrule of foreign kings and queens, and to the jealousies existing among the wealthy and greedy nobles. However, that was 400 years ago, and we have advanced in enlightenment and civilization, and particularly is this true here in the free West where we don't have even the remnants of Scandinavian class rule--but we do need each other.

    Such changes and improvements as take place in this world are as a rule very much needed and overdue, and such a community center, a Scandinavian People's House has been under discussion several times in the past. The idea has repeatedly shot across our horizon like a beam of light, and we take it as a good omen that it has now been revived by the Verdandi Lodge, Light Bearer, and again presented to Chicago's Scandinavian population.

    3

    Sceptics will declare that the Scandinavians, the Swedes, Norwegians and Danes, and for our present purpose we wish also to include our cousins, the Finlanders, cannot get along together. As part of our answer we will point out the fact that in recent years, during strikes and lockouts in anyone of the countries in question, the labor unions of the others have come to the aid, financially as well as morally, of the strikers, or those subjected to the lockout, and have helped them to hold out until an agreement was reached. Perfect co-operation exists among the labor unions of those countries and when union delegates have occasion to visit their brethren across the border, they always receive a hearty welcome. As far back as 1887, in London, England, a Swedish Workers' Club, two Norwegian and two Danish, united and formed a Scandinavian Workers' Society, which bought its own building and was active for many years with very beneficial results. There would be no difficulties among Scandinavian nationals were it not for a few mischief-makers.

    Our own capital, Washington, boasts a Scandinavian Society, the president 4of which is Mr. Sartz, former editor of the Norwegian publication Norden (The North), of Chicago. Both Paris and Rome have their Scandinavian organizations, their membership consisting mostly of students, writers and artists.

    We ought to be ashamed that with a Scandinavian population as large as that of Stockholm, we are not yet able to point to a Scandinavian People's House.

    The Chicago Federation of Labor has recently organized and incorporated a company for the purpose of erecting a Labor Temple at a cost of five hundred thousand dollars. The 150 Scandinavian organizations in our city should be able to finance a similar undertaking, and such a "federation" as we are here proposing would represent a power that would have to be reckoned with in the conduct of the city's affairs, and it would also promote Scandinavian unity in other parts of the United States.

    Such a Scandinavian People's House would become the center of the official 5social life of our people, and we tentatively suggest that it should be located as centrally as possible, and should contain modern facilities for theatrical performances and concerts, lecture rooms, lodge halls, class rooms for night schools and a library. In addition there should be a gymnasium, and a Swedish massage establishment, and also a restaurant; we would recommend that no alcoholic beverages be sold in the building. It would certainly be desirable to move the free Swedish labor bureau to such a location, and even to reorganize it into an All-Scandinavian agency.

    There are some 150,000 Swedes in Chicago, and of these, 40,000 do not belong to any church. Surely many of them would like to attend the scientific, historical and philosophical lectures in the projected People's House; the same goes for Norwegians, Danes and Finns.

    We sincerely hope that the great Swedish and Norwegian newspapers in Chicago will not permit themselves to be influenced by selfish interests, but will 6give the project their wholehearted support.

    We herewith request every Scandinavian lodge and society in Chicago to send delegates to the mass meeting which is to be held at Jaeger's Hall, Larrabee Street and Clybourn Avenue, July 17, at 8:00 P. M., for the purpose of discussing the plan; a working committee will then be appointed. Every organization should send at least one delegate and the larger ones, one for each hundred of their membership.

    Signed: A. Ahlberg

    K. J. Ellington

    K. G. Fredin

    M. J. Ring

    E. Johnson

    C. E. Kronlof

    A. Holm

    E. Ahlskog

    G. Berg

    J. G. Hamilton

    Never before have world conditions forced individuals to co-operation, drawn them together, as is the case now, in these days. The weak have to protect themselves against the abuses of ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, II B 2 d 1, I D 2 a 2, III B 2, V A 2, III H, I C, I E, V B, I C, I C
  • Svenska Nyheter -- July 05, 1904
    Swedish-American Portrait Gallery: John Henrik Rosberg

    For one who so to speak has made it his lifework to write about prominent Swedish Americans, it is particularly pleasant to meet a Swede, who is outstanding, not only because of his fine, magnetic personality, but also because of his typically Swedish capacity for hard work, coupled with the American knack for speed and accomplishment, which qualities have placed him among the leading Chicago manufacturers in his line.

    When, in addition, such a man has absorbed the best of what we will call the American spirit, and at the same time preserved the typically Swedish within himself, our pleasure is that much greater. Today we will introduce such a man.

    If one visits the big cabinet-making shop of Jessen & Rosberg and asks one of the men in overalls where Mr. John Rosberg may be found, he is likely to 2answer: "I am Mr. Rosberg. What can I do for you?"

    When the first surprise is over, one soon understands that this is the key to Mr. Rosberg's success. He personally supervises his plant from the engine room, construction and sandblasting departments to the finishing rooms, stock rooms and office. It is entirely unnecessary to call up in advance and ask for an appointment; he is somewhere in the plant, and wherever you find him, he is ready to talk to you.

    The firm manufactures a great variety of products, but, according to its comprehensive and elegantly finished catalogue, it specializes in watchmakers' work benches and dentists' laboratory benches and cabinets. Mr. Rosberg is now taking out a patent on his latest design for a dentist's cabinet, which is considered the finest on the market, and appears to be the answer to a dentist's prayer. This product has found a ready market not only in the United States, but also in South American and European countries; orders have even come in from Australia. To all appearances Mr. Rosberg stands to make a fortune on this 3design alone. The wholesale price is $125, which is considered reasonable, and orders are coming in faster than the firm can fill them.

    This particular instance shows up clearly the difference between America and Sweden in regard to business opportunities. Back home one might spend one's entire life making such a cabinet, and one will earn a bare living, while here the whole world is one's market, and one is assured of a reasonable profit.

    According to the catalogue, this firm has produced almost every watchmaker's bench now in use west of New York. This product, together with the dentist's bench is also of the firm's own design and patent protected. The superior qualities of the dentist's bench have been attested to by some of the most prominent dentists in the country.

    John Henrik Rosberg was born in Malmohus, Sweden, November 23, 1856. His father was a farmer, but the boy early showed a liking for working with tools and decided to become a cabinet-maker. He finished his apprenticeship in 1877, and since Copenhagen was known as a place where they made fine furniture 4he went to that city, where he worked for one year, and then left for Stockholm. He worked there until 1882, when he set out for America and came to Bridgeport, Connecticut where he obtained employment at Patterson's, a pipe organ manufacturing company. However, he did not stay there for long, but left for Chicago in July 1882. Here he worked for several firms until he and Mr. Jessen opened their own establishment on Jefferson Street. After some time they moved to 82 Fulton Street, and then moved again to Union Street. When that plant was destroyed by fire, they moved to their present location, 405 West Kinzie Street.

    In 1882 Mr. Rosberg married Miss Kerstin Holmgren a native of Arof, near Malmo, Sweden, and the marriage has been blessed with six strapping sons.

    Mr. Rosberg is a good mixer and a member of several lodges: King Oscar Lodge, Oriental Consistory and Mystic Shrine; in addition to these he also belongs to the Odd Fellow lodge, Atlas, and the Independent Order of Svithiod, No. 1.

    His partner, Mr. Jessen, died two years ago and Mr. Rosberg is now the sole owner of the concern, employing about sixty workers.

    For one who so to speak has made it his lifework to write about prominent Swedish Americans, it is particularly pleasant to meet a Swede, who is outstanding, not only ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, III A, V A 2, IV
  • Svenska Nyheter -- July 05, 1904
    Swedish-American Portrait Gallery: John Henrik Rosberg

    For one who so to speak has made it his lifework to write about prominent Swedish Americans, it is particularly pleasant to meet a Swede, who is outstanding, not only because of his fine, magnetic personality, but also because of his typically Swedish capacity for hard work, coupled with the American knack for speed and accomplishment, which qualities have placed him among the leading Chicago manufacturers in his line.

    When, in addition, such a man has absorbed the best of what we will call the American spirit, and at the same time preserved the typically Swedish within himself, our pleasure is that much greater. Today we will introduce such a man.

    If one visits the big cabinet-making shop of Jessen & Rosberg and asks one of the men in overalls where Mr. John Rosberg may be found, he is likely to 2answer: "I am Mr. Roseberg. What can I do for you?"

    When the first surprise is over, one soon understands that this is the key to Mr. Rosberg's success. He personally supervises his plant from the engine room, construction and sandblasting departments to the finishing rooms, stock rooms and office. It is entirely unnecessary to call up in advance and ask for an appointment; he is somewhere in the plant, and wherever you find him, he is ready to talk to you.

    The firm manufactures a great variety of products, but, according to its comprehensive and elegantly finished catalogue, it specializes in watchmakers' work benches and dentists' laboratory benches and cabinets. Mr. Rosberg is now taking out a patent on his latest design for a dentist's cabinet, which is considered the finest on the market, and appears to be the answer to a dentist's prayer. This product has found a ready market not only in the United States, but also in South American and European countries; orders have even come in from Australia. To all appearances Mr. Rosberg stands to make a fortune on this 3design alone. The wholesale price is $125, which is considered reasonable, and orders are coming in faster than the firm can fill them.

    This particular instance shows up clearly the difference between America and Sweden in regard to business opportunities. Back home one might spend one's entire life making such a cabinet, and one will earn a bare living, while here the whole world is one's market, and one is assured of a reasonable profit.

    According to the catalogue, this firm has produced almost every watchmaker's bench now in use west of New York. This product, together with the dentist's bench is also of the firm's own design and patent protected. The superior qualities of the dentist's bench have been attested to by some of the most prominent dentists in the country.

    John Henrik Rosberg was born in Malmohus, Sweden, November 23, 1856. His father was a farmer, but the boy early showed a liking for working with tools and decided to become a cabinet-maker. He finished his apprenticeship in 1877, and since Copenhagen was known as a place where they made fine furniture 4he went to that city, where he worked for one year, and then left for Stockholm. He worked there until 1882, when he set out for America and came to Bridgeport, Connecticut where he obtained employment at Patterson's, a pipe organ manufacturing company. However, he did not stay there for long, but left for Chicago in July 1882. Here he worked for several firms until he and Mr. Jessen opened their own establishment on Jefferson Street. After some time they moved to 82 Fulton Street, and then moved again to Union Street. When that plant was destroyed by fire, they moved to their present location, 405 West Kinzie Street.

    In 1882 Mr. Rosberg married Miss Kerstin Holmgren a native of Arof, near Malmo, Sweden, and the marriage has been blessed with six strapping sons.

    Mr. Rosberg is a good mixer and a member of several lodges: King Oscar Lodge, Oriental Consistory and Mystic Shrine; in addition to these he also belongs to the Odd Fellow lodge, Atlas, and the Independent Order of Svithiod, No. 1.

    His partner, Mr. Jessen, died two years ago and Mr. Rosberg is now the sole owner of the concern, employing about sixty workers.

    For one who so to speak has made it his lifework to write about prominent Swedish Americans, it is particularly pleasant to meet a Swede, who is outstanding, not only ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, III A, V A 2, IV
  • Svenska Nyheter -- July 19, 1904
    Swedish-American Portrait Gallery: the Erickson Brothers

    In sweden when the Ericsson brothers were mentioned one immediately thought of the world-famous John Ericsson, who built the "Monitor," and Nils Ericsson, the great railroad builder. As we all know, these two were brothers, born at Langbanshyttan, near Filipstad, in a mine supervisor's home.

    The two Erickson brothers, whom we shall presently tell you about, are two Swedish-Americans who also hail from Langbanshyttan and their names are John Erickson and Charles Julius Erickson. Unknown to most Chicago Swedes, they have traveled the hard road to success and have not yet reached the goal of their ambition although they are well on their way to it.

    It is natural that the Vermland boy born and reared in the mining district of that province should be mechanically inclined. From as far back as he 2can remember he had been watching the machinery and devices used in the operation of a mine; these awakened his interest and his desire to make similar and even more complicated mechanical contraptions.

    Undoubtedly inheritance and early environment have greatly influenced the lives of these two brothers. Their father, Anders Erickson, was an exceptionally handy and resourceful miner and also a clever cabinet and instrument maker. He emigrated with his family in 1869 and came to Kansas, where he took a homestead near Lindsborg, in the Smoky Hill Valley. After some time, when the farm was all paid for, he let others run it and occupied himself with more congenial work, such as instrument making and the construction of electric batteries, and electrical devices used for medical purposes. In his workshop the two boys had an opportunity to study chemistry and electricity.

    While they made and sold electric belts for a living, they experimented with 3telephones, for the purpose of developing an automatic central exchange board, which would reduce the number of operators required by the old system. They were successful, but soon discovered that Lindsborg did not offer any possibilities for marketing their product. They managed to obtain the financial backing of Anderson Brothers of Salina, Kansas, and moved to Chicago in 1893 in order to begin manufacturing on a large scale. However, established telephone interests here succeeded in discouraging them, and they decided to drop the plan--a decision which they probably now regret.

    An American inventor, Alhon B. Strowger, had in the early nineties patented and automatic telephone exchange and had one such installed in La Porte, Indiana. But as compared to the Erickson brothers' invention, his apparatus was too complicated and expensive. An agreement was reached in 1894 whereby the brothers were taken in as partners in the La Porte Company, and continued to improve their invention. The reorganized company was given the name of the Automatic Electric Company, and capitalized at three 4million dollars. Its plant, an up-to-date six-story structure, is located at Van Buren and Morgan Streets. In its laboratory, the two brothers have the best facilities for experimentation and for making improvements on their product. It is regrettable, and a loss to all Swedes that this new telephone system has not been named after its inventors; but it is probably too late now to do anything about it.

    The lives of the Erickson brothers have been filled with quiet work and have been, therefore, rather uneventful. John was born at Langbanshyttan, January 25, 1866, and came to America at the age of three. He attended the public schools, and worked in his father's shop. In 1900 he married Miss Maria Lindskog, a native of Karlstad, Sweden, and they have had two children, but only one is now living. Charles Julius was born in Lindsborg, Kansas, July 23, 1870. He also went through the public schools, and then worked for his father. He came to Chicago with his brother in 1893 and married Miss Elizabeth Schobeck in 1898; they have one child, a daughter.

    5

    Their mother is still living in Lindsborg, and has every reason to be proud of her two able and successful sons.

    In sweden when the Ericsson brothers were mentioned one immediately thought of the world-famous John Ericsson, who built the "Monitor," and Nils Ericsson, the great railroad builder. As we all ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, I D 1 a, V A 1, V A 2, III G, I C, IV