The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 29, 1878
    Rose Hill, a Swedish Creation.

    Rose Hill, one of Chicago's most beautiful suburbs is located a few miles north of Lincoln Park and not far from Lake Michigan. It is interesting for Swedish people to know that one of our countrymen, P.S.Peterson, has planted and is now the owner of a prominent nursery, well known, not only in Chicago, but also all over the United States for its trees which are planted along the streets and boulevards and in public, as well as in private gardens.

    Hundreds of thousands of trees from this prominent nursery have been shipped to various cities and their public parks. The gigantic elms along the beautiful boulevards on the south side of Chicago are from Rose Hill. The price for these trees varies from $25.00 up to $100.00 each.

    The owner of the Rose Hill Nursery, Mr. Peterson, a man of middle age, is 2typical of the strong sons from Sweden. He was born of poor parents at Oveds Kloster, Sweden, where he began to learn the work of gardening.

    After some study in Germany he settled in the United States and was for many years foreman at a prominent tree school in New York state. With the money he saved he came to Chicago twelve years ago and started his large business at Rose Hill, where he purchased some land at $200.00 per acre. From time to time he has expanded his business and property, until he now has planted and growing over three million young trees: elm, alder, ash, maple, and pine. Mr. Peterson has imported many trees from Europe and Scotland, 800,000 at one time. There are many trees we have in Sweden growing at Rose Hill. Many American trees have been shipped from there to Sweden and to other European countries.

    In good times the value of trees and plants shipped from Rose Hill was about fifty to sixty thousand dollars a year. The maintenance of the 3nursey is costly. Sometimes as many as forty people are employed and many of them must be very skilled....

    Rose Hill, one of Chicago's most beautiful suburbs is located a few miles north of Lincoln Park and not far from Lake Michigan. It is interesting for Swedish people to ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, II A 1, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 17, 1880
    Max Hjortsberg. His Sudden Death Last Night

    Mr. Max Hjortsberg, who was supposed to be on the sure road to certain recovery from the serious injuries received at Kensington on March 27, 1880, died last night very suddenly at his residence, 387 North LaSalle Street.

    Mr. Hjortsberg was born in Stockholm, Sweden, November 8, 1826, and was therefore, at the time of his death, nearly 54 years of age. He studied civil engineering when quite young, and at the early age of nineteen went to England where he was given charge of the construction of the docks at Hull a work of great importance both from a commercial and engineering point of view.

    In 1852 he came to this country and engaged in railroad building in southern Indiana and Missouri,

    He reached Chicago in 1854 and in the year following became Chief Engineer of the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad, a position which he filled, with credit to himself and satisfaction to the Company which employed him, 2until about a year ago. During this period of twenty-five years he did all the important engineering work of the road in Illinois, including the building of the massive structure which spans the Mississippi at Burlington and joins the two great states of Illinois and Iowa. Lately, as is well-known, he became the constructing engineer and architect of the new Pullman-Car Works in Kensington, the scene of the accident which in the end proved fatal.

    Mr. Hjortsberg was also a member of the Lincoln Park Board of Commissioners, the Historical Society, the Engineers' Club of the Northwest, and the British Society of Civil Engineers. He was a man of wide culture and prominent standing in the profession which he had so successfully followed.

    Mr. Hjortsberg was twice married, his first wife being a daughter of Mr. N. W. Lester of this city, by whom he had no children. In 1869 he married Mrs. Hubbard, a daughter of Col. C. G. Hammond...

    Mr. Hjortsberg, though a member of the Congregational Church, always retained his connection with the Lutheran Church of his earlier years. The time of the funeral will be announced today.

    Mr. Max Hjortsberg, who was supposed to be on the sure road to certain recovery from the serious injuries received at Kensington on March 27, 1880, died last night very ...

    Swedish
    IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 23, 1880
    New Invention by Captain John Ericson.

    Our great countryman, Captain John Ericson, has completed a new invention.

    The houses here are now built from eight to nine stories high in order to make expensive sites as profitable as possible. It has been impossible to bring the water up one level to another.

    Captain Ericson has now invented a pumping machine, which will force the water a considerable height. He calls this machine the caloric pump. It drives from 200 to 300 gallons of water an hour up to a height of fifty feet.

    Captain Ericson has obtained a patent on this machine. It is small, being only four feet high, and will be very practical, especially for tall buildings.

    The inventor said that he has not been working very hard on this pumping machine, but has used only his spare time on it. He doesn't think so much of it himself, 2but other professional men are of the opinion that it is of great value.

    Our great countryman, Captain John Ericson, has completed a new invention. The houses here are now built from eight to nine stories high in order to make expensive sites as ...

    Swedish
    II A 1, II A 2, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- July 06, 1880
    Unveiling of Monument for "Herman Roos"

    On January 2, 1880 Herman Roos, editor of the Swedish-American, a representative man in Scandinavian circles, and prominently known as an advocate of the doctrines of Voltaire and Thomas Paine, was accidentally run over by a train on the Michigan Southern Railroad and very seriously injured.

    Every effort was made to save his life, but death ensued shortly afterward. Mr. Roos was a man of finished education, a graduate of Copenhagen University, a terse and forcible writer, and his influence among the Scandinavian free-thinkers of America was wide-spread and generally acknowledged. Since his untimely death his friends have been engaged in raising funds to erect a monument over his grave in Waldheim Cemetery.

    The work was completed some weeks ago, and yesterday a large concourse of Scandinavian citizens formally unveiled the monument.

    2

    The many friends of the dead journalist and writer proceeded by train to Oak Park, and thence to the cemetery by carriages. The arrangements for the impressive ceremony were in charge of Messrs. Magnus Elmblad, F. T. Engstrom, Charles Eklund, Nels Anderson, A. Lindquist, and C. F. Nelson.

    The "Svea Society" of which the deceased was an honored member, were present, carrying their beautiful society flags.

    Arriving at the grave, Capt. O. G. Lange read from manuscript a tribute to the lamented dead, during which the veil was taken from the column, displaying a Scotch granite monument twelve feet high resting upon a pedestal four feet in height.

    The monument is very plain, no attempt having been made at ornamentation.

    The following is inscribed upon the base in the Swedish language:

    3

    "Sacred to the Memory of Moons. Herman Roos of Hjelmsater, Sweden, who, as Editor of the Swedish-American, Fought Nobly for the Mastery of Common Sense and Reason, over Bigotry, Superstition, and Hypocrisy. In Honor of These Pinciples, Liberal-Minded Countrymen and Friends Throughout the United States Raised This Monument".

    Besides Capt. Lange, ex-Consul Sundell and Mr. Marcus Thrane also addressed the people in Swedish. The music for the occasion was supplied by Nitsche's band, and the Svea Singing Society sang several selections over the grave.

    Among the prominent Scandinavian citizens present were the Hon. C.G.Linderburg, P.M.Almini, A.G.Lundburg, M. Salmonsen, Dr. Paoli, Mr. E. Hegstrom, Marcus Thrane, L. P. Nelson, K. Nelson, and others.

    After completing the ceremonies, the friends returned by train to the city.

    On January 2, 1880 Herman Roos, editor of the Swedish-American, a representative man in Scandinavian circles, and prominently known as an advocate of the doctrines of Voltaire and Thomas Paine, ...

    Swedish
    IV, II C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- November 30, 1881
    Rev. Jacob Bredberg Dead.

    The Rev. Jacob Bredberg, one of America's oldest Swedish clergymen died peacefully in Chicago, Thursday, November 24th. He had been pastor of St. Ausgarius Swedish Episcopal Church here for many years. The church is also called "Jenny Linds' Church." The first pastor was Gustav Unonius, who founded this the oldest church in Chicago, and Bredberg succeeded him.

    Jacob Bredberg was born in Alingsas, Sweden, May 1, 1808. He was ordained priest in 1832, after completing his studies. He served as pastor for twenty years in his native land. He emigrated to Chicago in 1853 where he was affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Pastor Bredberg was clergyman of this church from 1853 to 1863 when he was received into the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States of America. He was appointed rector of St. Ausgarius Swedish Episcopal Church in Sedgwick St., remaining there till 1877, when he resigned.

    Pastor Bredberg was very highly educated and translated the ritual of the Protestant Episcopal Church from English into Swedish. He also made translations

    2

    from the English, French and Bohmish language.

    The hymnals now in use by the Swedish Methodist Church are the work of Bredberg. He married in 1840,Charlotta Caroline Bergstrom. He is survived by his widow, two sons and one daughter.

    He has been confined to his bed since 1877, when he had a stroke of paralysis. Death was, therefore, a God send.

    The funeral was held last Saturday. The ritual of the Episcopal Church was used. The Rt. Rev. Doctor W.E.McLaren, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago officiated assisted by several clergymen of the church.

    Pastor Bredberg's successor, the Rev. J. Hedman read one of his original poems. Burial was at Graceland cemetery.

    The Rev. Jacob Bredberg, one of America's oldest Swedish clergymen died peacefully in Chicago, Thursday, November 24th. He had been pastor of St. Ausgarius Swedish Episcopal Church here for many ...

    Swedish
    IV, II A 3 b, I A 2 c
  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 25, 1882
    A Paradise Close to Chicago.

    EDITORIAL. The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprints an editorial from the Chicago Evening Journal concerning Mr. P.S. Peterson's Nursery at Rosehill.

    The author of this article took recently a trip north and came to a real paradise in the heart of Jefferson Township - Mr. P.S. Peterson's Nursery at Rosehill, which grand place is located not fully eight miles from the city. Lincoln Avenue goes through this glorious nursery and is a short distance from Mr. Peterson's magnificient home.

    The nursery consists of 365 acres and its owner has with care and intelligence taken care of its expansion during a quarter of a century.

    2

    The property, surrounded by tall trees and beautified with grass lawns, flower-beds and bushes, is an ideal of comfort, as well as a charming country home.

    Many of the large shade trees have been moved from other places to Rosehill by Mr. Peterson himself, and he is as attached to each one of them as if they were his own children.

    The oldest and tallest of all the trees is a stately elm. "This" - said Mr. Peterson, pointing with pride at the tree - "is George Washington, and this," pointing at another large elm, "is Abraham Lincoln, and this is General Sherman and there is General Grant."

    Mr. Peterson has millions of trees on his farm and he knows each type by sight. Most of these trees of all dimensions and types are planted in long rows and assume the appearance of large armies, regiments, brigades, and divisions. There are elms, maples, birches, ash, lark, chesnut, mulberry, and wild cherry.

    3

    In other words, every conceivable type of tree that can be grown in this latitude is ready to be re-planted. Many of them are imported from Europe and other parts of the world. Flowers, many of rare and exotic beauty, are found in abundance.

    Mr. Peterson has one of the largest and finest collections of trees, bushes, and flowers in the entire West, as well as a pleasant home.

    Mr. Peterson keeps more than twenty-five horses, and has one of the finest stables in the State of Illinois.

    EDITORIAL. The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprints an editorial from the Chicago Evening Journal concerning Mr. P.S. Peterson's Nursery at Rosehill. The author of this article took recently a trip north ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, II A 1, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 16, 1888
    Lincoln Park.

    "The Pearl of Chicago" as Lincoln Park is called, presents itself in a most beautiful setting this summer all the way from North Ave. to Diversy St. and from Clark St. down to the shores of Lake Michigan.

    The most beautiful spot seems to be near the main entrance to the park, where there is a beautiful flower bed seventy-eight feet long and sixty-four feet wide, filled with thousands of different flowers. The gardener who planted it is our countryman, C. J. Strombeck, who has been employed at the park for fourteen years. He has five assistants. More than 200,000 flowers were planted by him this spring. He also takes care of all the greenhouses. Strombeck was born in Linkoping, Sweden. He was graduated at the Swedish Garden Society, Stockholm and arrived in Chicago in 1869.

    "The Pearl of Chicago" as Lincoln Park is called, presents itself in a most beautiful setting this summer all the way from North Ave. to Diversy St. and from Clark ...

    Swedish
    II A 1, V A 2, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 18, 1888
    The Americans and the Scandinavians

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday to the Swedish, Norwegians and Danish people living in Chicago.....

    The paper stated that the Scandinavians are known widely to be an industrious and hardworking people. They learn the English language faster and better than any other nationality and take a lively and intelligent part in politics. Most of them are Republicans but many are going to follow Congressman John Lind of Minnesota and vote the Democratic ticket.

    Among the more prominent Swedes in Chicago is Robert Lindblom, who is a very active man.

    He is a man who likes to "sing out" his opinion in such a sarcastic manner that he is envied among many newspaper men.

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday to the Swedish, Norwegians and Danish people living in Chicago..... The paper stated that the Scandinavians are known widely to ...

    Swedish
    I C, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 18, 1888
    The Americans and the Scandinavians

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday, to the Swedish Norwegian and Danish people living in Chicago, their moral, physical and political standing. These constitute a total population of 60,000 or more. The paper stated that the Scandinavians are known widely to be an industrious and hardworking people. They learn the English language faster and better than any other nationality and take a lively and intelligent part in politics. Most of them are Republicans, but many are going to follow Congressman John Lind of Minnesota and vote the Democratic ticket. Among the more prominent Swedes in Chicago is Robert Lindblom, who is a very active man.

    He is a man who likes to "sing out" his opinion in such a sarcastic manner that he is envied among many newspaper men.

    The Chicago Times devoted almost an entire column last Sunday, to the Swedish Norwegian and Danish people living in Chicago, their moral, physical and political standing. These constitute a total ...

    Swedish
    I C, IV
  • Skandinaven -- August 12, 1889
    Debut

    Ullie Akerstrom, a Swedish girl, will make her first appearance here in Chicago at the McVickers Theater tonight. She was born here in Chicago. She is very talented, and while still quite young, made several appearances here as an amateur. Her style was original, and as a dilettante she was an attraction. She made her first professional appearance at the Boston Theater of Boston during a twenty-six week engagement. Her next engagement was in New York, where the Gotham critics praised her highly. They said, "She is the most gracious dancer New York has seen in many years."

    She will appear here in a new Musical Comedy written by herself. The title of the comedy is "Annette, the Dancing Girl."

    The Scandinavians are proud of their daughter.

    Ullie Akerstrom, a Swedish girl, will make her first appearance here in Chicago at the McVickers Theater tonight. She was born here in Chicago. She is very talented, and while ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 d 2, II B 1 c 2, IV