The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- December 01, 1888
    In Swedish Homes

    The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprints parts of an interesting article from the Providence Sunday Journal, which is very favorable to the Swedes. The title of the article is "In Swedish Homes," The journal says among other things, "Thriftiness" is the distinguishing character among the Swedes, both men and women have a natural instinct to find satisfaction in doing good. They show these qualities, with which they are born, in their clear, unwrinkled foreheads and round innocent faces. Physical activity, however, has formed these types with strong muscles. That is one of the reasons why so many young Swedish women are employed as servants in American homes. The men are all sober, and of high moral quality.

    2

    The young unmarried Swedish women in this country outnumber the married women.

    When a Swede was asked how his country could spare so many of its daughters he answered: "If you lose one, thousands are still left."

    Swedes are so well known in this country, that we do not need to talk about their faithfulness and their pleasant appearance. Some of these women have noble, even beautiful faces. They are all pleasant and simple in their daily lives.

    They find the social privileges in American life so very pleasant that they write home about this all the time. They are skilful in their work and like to have everything in good order.

    Those Swedes who arrive here have a little money. They are stately persons, with blue eyes, blonde hair. Many of the women are real beauties.

    The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprints parts of an interesting article from the Providence Sunday Journal, which is very favorable to the Swedes. The title of the article is "In Swedish ...

    Swedish
    III A, III G, I K
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 06, 1890
    [Hold Graduation Exercises]

    Graduation exercises were held last Saturday, February 1, in the Swedish School of Midwifery, 189 E. Huron Street. Among the graduates were three Scandinavian women: Mrs. Gudivia Jacobson, Miss Hannan Bahrd and Mrs. Ella Olsen.

    This school, which is being conducted by Dr. Sven Windrow, with Miss Anna Malmquist as his chief Assistant, fills a great need in our community, and certainly not least for our Swedish women, of whom not many would be in a position to attend the regular American institutions teaching this subject. It is the only Swedish school,of its kind in the United States, and as a school of this type it enjoys a well-earned reputation. The new course, now in progress, numbers eight students.

    Graduation exercises were held last Saturday, February 1, in the Swedish School of Midwifery, 189 E. Huron Street. Among the graduates were three Scandinavian women: Mrs. Gudivia Jacobson, Miss Hannan ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 f, II D 3, I K
  • Svenska Tribunen -- September 21, 1892
    The Swedish Women as Domestics.

    In the New York Herald recently appeared an article, in which the Swedish girls were given great praise for their adaptability and fine qualities as domestic servants. Most of our Swedish-American newspapers have reprinted the article and commented upon it. Even a Norwegian paper here in Chicago, "Norden", has commented upon the article in question, in part as follows: "It is to be pointed out, however, that neither the young women nor the young men from our Scandinavian countries come here with a view to remaining merely good domestic servants, or in subordinated positions. They set out with hopes and determination to make their fortunes and gain such positions in life as they can rightfully claim by virtue of their ability, honesty and industriousness".

    It can not be denied that our lassies from home make excellent domestics, but undoubtedly this is the reason why they also make excellent housewives. under no circumstance do the sons and daughters of our nationality intend to remain on the bottom rungs of the ladder. Surely, even if somewhat slowly, they are working towards higher levels. And it is our guess that, if the children born here of Swedish parents do not go altogether wrong, the day will come, as it already has come to pass in the State of Pennsylvania, when it generally will be thought an honor and a privilege to have Swedish blood in one's veins.

    In the New York Herald recently appeared an article, in which the Swedish girls were given great praise for their adaptability and fine qualities as domestic servants. Most of our ...

    Swedish
    I K, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 20, 1901
    Swedish American Women's Club.

    p.11.... The Swedish American Women's Club held their annual meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 13th, at Mrs. Martha Hall's Home at 1762 N. Clark St. About seventy women were present. Dr. Francis Dickenson, President of Harvey Medical School who was guest of honor spoke on "Women in Public Life."

    As officers for the year, those elected are: Othelia Myhrman, President; Miss Lottie Forstrom, Vice President; Mrs. Martha S. Hall, Recording Secretary; Miss Amanda Lundquist, Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. Hulia Johnson, Collector of Dues.

    After the meeting coffee and Swedish coffee-cake was served.

    p.11.... The Swedish American Women's Club held their annual meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 13th, at Mrs. Martha Hall's Home at 1762 N. Clark St. About seventy women were present. Dr. ...

    Swedish
    I F 2, I K
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 27, 1901
    Pioneer Women

    p.6...The Swedish pioneering man is often praised and honored through speeches, newspaper articles, festivals and festival poetry. This is right and their due. Our pioneers have been heroes and have earned their names in history.

    But who thinks of the happy queen into whose true blue eyes the pioneer gazed, until he was certain he could not live without her? Who thinks of her, who in stock-house and cave prepared food and made clothing, reared children and kept the family clean and in good health for years with much economy, that in later times people shall say: "It was nothing less than a miracle." Who thinks of her who often remained at home alone, while the man was away at work for months; and neighbors only to be found in the next township or county? Who thinks of mother's furrowed brow, gnarled hands and bent figure? But she - she is the mother of our great West. Without her such a beautiful reality would have been impossible. All hail to her, the Swedish-American pioneer woman!

    p.6...The Swedish pioneering man is often praised and honored through speeches, newspaper articles, festivals and festival poetry. This is right and their due. Our pioneers have been heroes and have ...

    Swedish
    I K, I J
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 22, 1901
    [A Thought] for the Day (Editorial) by Carl Swensson

    The fact that the President's trip had to be canceled because of Mrs. McKinley's illness shows that human beings never will be other than poor earthly creatures.

    No place of honor, no homage, no nation's proud and happy patriotism, will free this earth-bound creature from suffering, from illness, from sorrow. In that respect our likeness to one another is greater than one thinks. We are all brothers, for we are all dust and ashes.

    But Mrs. McKinley's illness has elicited many a noble response from her, the President, and our nation as a whole.

    The patient had hardly recovered consciousness yesterday before she began 2praying that her illness not in any way interfere with the great festivities, which she hoped might proceed just as if nothing had happened. She inquired as to the well-being of the rest of the women in the company, and hoped that her indisposition would not interfere with others' pleasure in the party. This is what [that noble woman] said, though she herself was so ill that the doctor had little hope for her recovery.

    Mrs. McKinley has been weak and sickly for years, but this has never hindered her from devoting her whole heart and her warmest, most undivided interest, to the furthering of her husband's highest ambitions. She has done her utmost to be a helpmate for him, to lead him, and to lighten the heavy burdens which weighed upon his shoulders. Even in that respect her ambition far outstripped her physical powers, so that one of necessity tried to protect her from her beautiful, noble forgetfulness of self. Mrs. McKinley is old-fashioned enough to "be with her man" and to content herself with being his stay and joy and help.

    An old-fashioned thought, it is true, but one wafted from paradise itself in 3this time of selfish, masculine women, whose only motive for caring for their husbands and their homes is love of money; who, for the rest, have as life's aim the ability to remain something independent of, and apart from, their husbands; and the husband is no longer his wife's "head"--just as she should be his "heart"--but only her errandboy, her treasurer, her protector.

    Mrs. McKinley is a true, noble woman, and, this, her real womanliness, is ever her adornment. This virtue also makes it easy and natural for her husband's love, esteem, and trust to reach such heights under all circumstances. It is only an honorable, really womanly soul that a man seeks in his mate, if he himself is really a man. A man and a woman--that is life's, nature's, God's, combination for the realization of true happiness on earth and in one's community.

    One thing is sure: The man is less esteemed than in the past. Woman's development has monopolized the public mind for quite a number of decades. All for the woman--that has been the motto among us. What has been the result? Who can, who dares fully answer such a question?

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    One thing more is sure: No one breaks the laws of Nature and of God and escapes unscathed. No attempts to remove the distinctions between man and woman could, in the long run, succeed or be of any value. Woman will never successfully play the role of a man, nor, on the other hand, will man ever play that of woman. "The two are one", but neither of the halves will ever be successful in playing the other's part.

    Tens of thousands of true men, who read of the interest Mrs. McKinley always has taken in her man, in his happiness and success, in his development and prosperity, will sigh and think, though caution prevents them from actually saying the words, "Oh, to have a mate like that!" and at the same time [the activities and ways of their own wives] come to mind: the constant committee work, the club meetings, the grave and austere mien, the cold, forbidding heart, the air of self-importance which is so hard to describe--activities and traits which all are closely associated with "the modern woman," and which all are foreign to the old ideal of womanhood, when the wife was proudly and reverently called "the queen of the home".

    5

    A thousand cheers for Mrs. McKinley, mate and woman!

    Three "Vive's" for the Swedish, the Swedish-American woman--our mother, wife, daughter, sister; but a just and hearty condemnation for the mannish woman of our time.

    On the other hand the President has set an ideal example of how the man should cherish and protect "the weaker sex". He has never forgotten his wife, her need for love and kindness; her heart, her need for attention and support. He is his wife's true and faithful knight, a model husband whose excellence no one could surpass.

    These days have also shown how highly the nation loves its presidential pair. The whole country has felt as if one of the family has been ill. Hundreds of telegrams have brought greetings and inquired about the noble patient's condition. Our country loves and esteems its leaders; this is an unusually good sign of the times.

    6

    How happy we all are that we have heard by telegraph that the country's mother is much improved and that hope is held out for her quick recovery!

    But the same post has brought us the news of Mrs. Lyman Gage's death, Secretary Hay's illness, Governor Nash's poisoning by a dangerous growth in the forest, Miss Long's dangerous illness in Colorado Springs. Yes, it is true enough that we are dust and ashes, everyone, "Smalandingar". (Smaland-folk, or people of little province) before our Lord above.

    The fact that the President's trip had to be canceled because of Mrs. McKinley's illness shows that human beings never will be other than poor earthly creatures. No place of ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a, I K
  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 23, 1901
    Swedish-American Women's Club

    This club met recently to welcome four members who had been visiting in Sweden. The guests of honor were Misses Lottie and Minnie Forstrom and Miss and Mrs. Rosen. Artistically wrought emblems and flowers were the gifts bestowed on the travelers. Speeches were made by Professor Wilson, Emely , Evald and Dr. Davidson.

    This club met recently to welcome four members who had been visiting in Sweden. The guests of honor were Misses Lottie and Minnie Forstrom and Miss and Mrs. Rosen. Artistically ...

    Swedish
    I K
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 15, 1902
    Swedish Women Plan Benefit Feast

    The Swedish-American Women's Club held its annual meeting last Friday and elected officers for the year 1902. The club is planning a feast to be held at Phoenix hall, February 14 for the benefit of the poor.

    The Swedish-American Women's Club held its annual meeting last Friday and elected officers for the year 1902. The club is planning a feast to be held at Phoenix hall, February ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, I K
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 12, 1902
    [Charity Concert]

    The Swedish-American Women's Club will give a charity concert next Friday night at Phoenix Hall. The well-known Jane Addams from Hull House will appear on the program. The net income from the concert will be distributed among poor Swedish families in Chicago.

    The Swedish-American Women's Club will give a charity concert next Friday night at Phoenix Hall. The well-known Jane Addams from Hull House will appear on the program. The net income ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II D 10, II D 1, I K
  • Svenska Nyheter -- May 05, 1903
    Celebration in Honor of Miss Danielson

    Miss Anna Danielson, the Swedish educator mentioned in a previous issue of this paper, arrived in Chicago last Thursday afternoon. On the evening of the same day, a social in her honor was held in the rooms of Chicago Woman's Club, in the Fine Arts Building. This manner of greeting an honored guest from a foreign land was sponsored by Swedish-American Woman's Club, the International Women's Luther League (Chicago Branch), and the Women's Home and Foreign Mission Society, and a large number of Swedes who gathered to welcome the guest of honor.

    The social opened with a violin solo by Miss Karin Lindskog, accompanied by Mr. Sigurd Meck. The Rev. Mrs. Emma Evald made a speech of welcome....

    2

    to Miss Danielson. She emphasized that women in Sweden are not at all behind their brothers in the country, and in this connection mentioned some Swedish women who have won international fame. Among them: Christina Nelson, Jenny Lind, Fredrika Bremer, Selma Lagerlof. We waited in vain, however, for the name of the woman who has endeared herself so greatly to all Swedish lovers of liberty, Miss Ellen Key.

    Mrs. Evald introduced Editor Jacob Bongren, who had tuned his many-stringed lyre, and in honor of the occasion, gave an ode to the women of the North. Our little song bird, Miss Ida Linn, charmed us with an attractive English song, which we would have been glad to have exchanged for one of the joyous refreshing Swedish folk songs. Reverend Mrs. Tengvall gave a speech 3in Swedish in honor of Miss Danielson. Knowing as we do Mrs. Tengvall's views concerning the instruction in religion in the public schools, we do not quite understand her expression of hope that "from the practical American method of education, Miss Danielson might take home with her ideas by which she might benefit the Swedish educational system, based as it is upon Christian principles."

    After the speech, Miss Helen Svenson sang a couple of English songs, and Miss Anna Evald gave two recitations. The Concordia Sextette, consisting of six young girls, sang an appealing song, and the female jurist, Mrs. McCullom, delivered a speech in which she emphasized that the knowledge-thirsty women in America as well as in other countries had been obliged to fight to 4gain entrance into the higher institutions of learning..... The well-known soloist, Miss Margaret Dahlstrom, gave a number, and as the last on the program, the guest of honor made a warm-hearted speech in English. The fact that she had an easy command of English furnished proof of the truth of the statements made by earlier speakers concerning women as against men: that the knowledge-thirsty woman does not rank below the knowledge-thirsty man. Miss Danielson expressed surprise that Swedes in America could remain Swedes in their hearts and souls and yet be good Americans.... She acknowledged that Sweden can learn much from the American system of education, but she also contended that America can learn much from the Swedish educational system.....

    After the program, a light supper was served in the richly decorated hall of the social.

    Miss Anna Danielson, the Swedish educator mentioned in a previous issue of this paper, arrived in Chicago last Thursday afternoon. On the evening of the same day, a social in ...

    Swedish
    I K, III B 2