The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 09, 1878
    Our Veterans.

    EDITORIAL: The existence of The Union was a vital question sometime ago. At that time it was requested of every man to offer himself on the country's altar and sacrifice home, peace, wife, children, parents and future. There were thousands and thousands who called this country their adopted land. Their offer was the greatest, their love the purest. Among them were the Swedes, With unusual willingness did they obey the call issued by Lincoln, and they fought bravely on the battlefields. There were many who never returned from the battlefield, where death reaped a rich harvest. But some of them are still among the living; they remain as witnesses of the fact that the hard times we have now, cannot compare to that time when the call was issued by the President to fight for the welfare of the country.

    We all owe these men, our veterans, both thankfulness and respect. They did their part to save America politically and to give the negroes their freedom.

    We were reminded of these thoughts at a Swedish Soldiers' Convention, which was held at Bishop Hill on October 2nd.

    2

    About six hundred people - many of them veterans of the latest war gathered together. How many of these six hundred people really were veterans, is hard to say. The remainder of Company D of the 57th Volunteer Regiment of Illinois arranged the festival ceremonies. The Company's captain, Eric Johnson, made an inspiring address on the history of the Company. Lieutenant Berglund of West Point sent a telegram regretting his inability to be present, as did also Major Fors Kansas. ...

    EDITORIAL: The existence of The Union was a vital question sometime ago. At that time it was requested of every man to offer himself on the country's altar and sacrifice ...

    Swedish
    III D, III A, I G
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 28, 1891
    Returns from Scientific Expedition.

    A. M. Westergren, the artist, returned last week to Chicago from a scientific expedition along the west coast of South America. This expedition, which lasted four months, and was conducted by the United States Government under the supervision of the eminent authority, Prof. Agassiz, had as its object the study of deep sea formations, which were drawn and depicted by Westergren.

    A. M. Westergren, the artist, returned last week to Chicago from a scientific expedition along the west coast of South America. This expedition, which lasted four months, and was conducted ...

    Swedish
    IV, II A 3 c, III D
  • Svenska Tribunen -- December 17, 1891
    Swedish Civil War Veteran Dies.

    One of the most well-known Swedes of the "old stock" in Chicago passed away last Monday, the 14th. He was Captain A. Stenbeck. He was born in Hafvaroed, Sweden, in 1828 and came to America in 1854. He lived at first in Galesburg, Ill., where he joined an infantry regiment of volunteers. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was commissioned Captain of the Second Illinois Artillery, Battery H., and took part with distinction in the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Clarksville and Nashville. Chicago has been his home ever since 1866.

    One of the most well-known Swedes of the "old stock" in Chicago passed away last Monday, the 14th. He was Captain A. Stenbeck. He was born in Hafvaroed, Sweden, in ...

    Swedish
    IV, III D
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 22, 1892
    Three Times Around the World, as Mail Carrier

    Yesterday our countryman Charles A. Olander could look back upon twenty year as a Mail Carrier for Uncle Sam. On June 21st, 1872 at 10 A. M., Olander was sworn in as Mail Carrier by the then Postmaster, Frank Eastman. Olander is only fifty-two years old and is in fine physical trim, which he attributes to the daily long walks. It has been estimated that in these twenty years he has walked a distance equal to three times the distance around the world.

    Yesterday our countryman Charles A. Olander could look back upon twenty year as a Mail Carrier for Uncle Sam. On June 21st, 1872 at 10 A. M., Olander was sworn ...

    Swedish
    III D, II A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- July 27, 1892
    [Consul Sundell Dies]

    One of the most prominent Swedish men, not only in Chicago but in the United States, passed away yesterday morning, July 26. The Grim Reaper has claimed our countryman, Consul Charles J. Sundell. Heart failure was the cause of his death. He was seventy years old.

    Sundell was born in Stockholm, Sweden, June 1, 1822. As a young man he traveled widely in Germany, Belgium, France and the Netherlands. Upon his return to Sweden he established himself in business, but the wanderlust had taken possession of him and in 1849 he emigrated to America. In 1850 we find him in San Francisco, where he tried his luck as a gold miner. But his desire for adventure drove him on. By the way of the Sandwich and Friendship Islands he arrived at Sydney, Australia, in 1851, and shortly afterwards at Port Melbourne, where he met success as a prospector for gold. A longing for home made him return to Sweden, however, and late in the year of 1852 he made his re-appearance in the city of his birth. But he was not destined to remain there. He decided to return to America, and in February of 1853 he arrived at Chicago.

    His first job in Chicago was with the Michigan Central Railway. A short time later he started a match factory, but failed, whereupon he entered into partnership with Anders Larson in the manufacture of soft beverages. In 1858 he was appointed Vice-Consul for Sweden and Norway. This position he held 2Severe losses in land speculations forced him out of business, however, and by and by Sundell secured the position as Recording Clerk at the Chicago post office. This marks the turning point in the public life of Sundell.

    By nature Sundell was endowed with an alert mind for civic and political matters. In 1856 he had worked hard for the election of Fremont for President, and in 1860 he worked zealously for the election of Abraham Lincoln. After the election of this great man, Sundell was honored with the appointment as American consul at Stettin, Prussia, and in July 1861 he took up his duties at this important port on the Baltic coast. This position he held all during the trying times of the Danish-Prussian War and our own Civil War; and the archives of the State Department in Washington, D.C. bear eloquent testimonial and witness to the fact of his brilliance and ability as a Statesman and Diplomat.

    But still greater honors were in store for Consul Sundell. In 1867 he was appointed Assistant Secretary of the American Embassy at Bucharest, Roumania; but this work was not to his liking, and later that year he resigned and returned to Chicago, where he remained ever since. Here he has been engaged in various fields of business, but his real prominence here has grown out of his position as the General Western Agent of the famous Allan Line. From this position he resigned only last year.

    3

    For the Swedish descendants of Chicago and America, Consul Sundell has worked hard and unselfishly. His work has been that of a pioneer. As early as 1854 he organized the first Scandinavian Society of the Western States, It was called "Skandinaviska Unionen i Chicago". In 1857 he proposed and was one of the organizers of Society Svea. In 1858, just five years after his arrival here, he became a naturalized American citizen. He was a speaker of note, and very rarely was his name missing on any list of speakers at a Swedish affair of any consequence. When the question of honoring our great countryman, Carl von Linne was proposed, Sundell was one of the most enthusiastic spokesmen for the idea. He was elected the first vice-president of the Linne Monument Society and it is largely due to his untiring work that the plans came into full realization. In later years he was appointed to serve as a member of the Chicago Board of Education.

    He was a real gentleman, enriched by experiences usually denied common mortals, and his life's work spurs us on with inspiration.

    The deceased is mourned by his widow and three adult children, one son and two daughters. The son is a lawyer, and resides in Washington, D.C.

    One of the most prominent Swedish men, not only in Chicago but in the United States, passed away yesterday morning, July 26. The Grim Reaper has claimed our countryman, Consul ...

    Swedish
    IV, II A 2, III D, II C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 07, 1894
    Carl Johan Stalbrand, Obituary

    General C.J.Stalbrand, who was Artillery Chief in John A. Logan's regiment, died yesterday in Charleston, S.C.

    It would not be fair to the memory of this man to say, only these few words, because Stalbrand was one of our most prominent Swedish-Americans. General Sherman said at one time that Stalbrand was the bravest man in the armies of The Union.

    Stalbrand was born in 1821 in Skane, Sweden. He was enrolled in Wendes Artillery Regiment, where he was promoted to a sergeant. He resigned and came to America, and landed in Chicago, where he struggled hard to make a living. He got work in the "Recorders Office," and later became chairman of the Svea Society.

    Then the Civil War broke out and Stalbrand enrolled as Captain of Company G in the Illinois 2nd Artillery Regiment on March 4, 1861. He was promoted 2to Major at the end of the same year. General Logan very much appreciated Stalbrand's service.

    Stalbrand was sent by General Sherman to Washington to inform Pres. Lincoln of Sherman's famous march through Georgia and that he had occupied Savannah.

    When Abraham Lincoln had read the reports and was going to bid the messenger farewell he said, "Goodby, Brigade General Stalbrand."

    Stalbrand had thus advanced from a sergeant in a Swedish Artillery Regiment to the post of Brigade General in the glorious army of the Great Republic!

    We find Stalbrand as the owner of a plantation in South Carolina after the war He was elected to Congress in 1870. Although Stalbrand was not very well known among the younger generation of our countrymen in the United States we will never forget that Carl Johan Stalbrand was very prominent in the great fight for the Union.

    "Peace over his memory."

    General C.J.Stalbrand, who was Artillery Chief in John A. Logan's regiment, died yesterday in Charleston, S.C. It would not be fair to the memory of this man to say, only ...

    Swedish
    III D, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 19, 1896
    P. A. Sundelius: Obituary.

    A well known Swedish-American in Chicago, P. A. Sundelius, died yesterday, at fifty-six years of age. He was born in Uddevalla, Sweden, where he received his education, but went abroad when he was twenty-four. He arrived in America in 1864 and was enrolled in the Union Army. Sundelius was wounded in Petersburg, Fla. and was bedridden for one and one-half years. He recovered and came to Chicago in the fall of 1866, where he became a teacher. He attended Augustana College, Paxton, Ill., later on, but became a newspaperman in 1869. Sundelius was appointed to a position in the Customs House in Chicago in 1873 and later on in the Recorders Office, which position he held until his death.

    Sundelius became interested in politics and was three times elected on the Republican ticket to the Legislature of the State of Illinois. He once more became a newspaperman in 1884. He is survived by his wife and two sons.

    A well known Swedish-American in Chicago, P. A. Sundelius, died yesterday, at fifty-six years of age. He was born in Uddevalla, Sweden, where he received his education, but went abroad ...

    Swedish
    IV, II A 1, I F 5, III D
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 25, 1897
    Axel Lars Turnquist, Obituary

    One of the oldest Swedish settlers in Chicago, Apothecary Axel Lars Turnquist, died last Wednesday. He was born in Sweden, September 24,1838, and arrived in American in 1856; he was enrolled for three years with the Illinois 15th Regiment. He went to Chicago after the war and was married but lost everything in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. He opened a drug store a couple years later on Wentworth Ave.

    The funeral was one of the largest held in Chicago, so far. The coffin was covered with the American Flag and members of G.A.R. attended the rites.

    One of the oldest Swedish settlers in Chicago, Apothecary Axel Lars Turnquist, died last Wednesday. He was born in Sweden, September 24,1838, and arrived in American in 1856; he was ...

    Swedish
    III D, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 26, 1900
    A New Military Organization

    A Swedish-American meeting of veterans of the Civil and,the Spanish American wars, was held yesterday at the North Side Turner Hall. The group organized itself under the name of "The Swedish American Veteran's Association." The following were elected officers for the period of six months: Ernest G.Dahl, president; Charles Stark, vice-president; O.B.Swanson, secretary; George Ydeen, secretary of finances; August Lundval, treasurer. Among the members of of this new organization are men, who fought in the Civil War, seamen who fought under the command of General Dewey, and others who fought in the battle of Santiago, and men who were stationed in the Philippines and in Cuba. A rather heated argument developed between a Civil War veteran, and a veteran of the Spanish-American war. The bone of contention was,as to whether those former soldiers who did not serve in any war, would be eligible for membership of this organization. It was finally decided, that those soldiers, who have taken active part in the fight against Indians have the right to the membership. Another heated debate 2ensued, covering whether non-citizen veterans of the Spanish-American war, should be admitted to membership. This question was settled in the veterans favor. A bright future has been predicted for this new association, judging by the great number of Swedes who have participated in various wars.

    A Swedish-American meeting of veterans of the Civil and,the Spanish American wars, was held yesterday at the North Side Turner Hall. The group organized itself under the name of "The ...

    Swedish
    III D
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 20, 1901
    Medals for the Guard

    p.11..... There will be a medal distribution next Friday evening at the Second Regiment Armory for the Second Regiment of the Illinois National Guards. All officers and men who have been in the service at least five years will receive medals.

    Among those included are Captain Gustave A. Larson, Lieutenant Adolph Erickson, Sergeants Oscar M. Peterson and Gustaf Erickson, Corporal Charles L. Simonson, and Private Adam F. Abrahamson.

    Governor Yates is expected at the affair.

    p.11..... There will be a medal distribution next Friday evening at the Second Regiment Armory for the Second Regiment of the Illinois National Guards. All officers and men who have ...

    Swedish
    III D