The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Die Fackel -- May 20, 1883
    [Scandinavian Socialists Hold Mass Meeting]

    The Mass Meeting was held by the Scandinavian Socialists at 742 West North Avenue, at which Peter Peterson was chairman and comrades Schilling, Parsons and a Danish party comrade who were speakers.

    The following resolutions were accepted: In consideration that the terrible murderer called the English Government, is or will ask the extradition of two freedom loving persons, whose only crime is the accomplishment of the emancipation of the Irish people against the oppression and despotism and considering that it would be committing treason against the Declaration of Independence to extradite Walsh and Sheridan for the British Government --it was resolved that we will oppose and fight this extradition with all means at our disposal. We call, therefore, on our good citizens to give us their support to save this country from such shame.

    The Mass Meeting was held by the Scandinavian Socialists at 742 West North Avenue, at which Peter Peterson was chairman and comrades Schilling, Parsons and a Danish party comrade who ...

    Swedish
    III B 1, III B 1, III B 1, I F 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 19, 1892
    Swedish Republican Mass Meeting.

    The mass meeting held last Thursday evening in Armory Hall, Battery D, was the largest and most successful meeting ever held by Swedish people in Chicago. More than 3000 people were present at this meeting, which was opened by Edward Westman, chairman of the Cook County Swedish-American Central Committee. In his opening address he pointed out that there are more than 12,000 legal voters among the Swedes in Chicago alone, and perhaps as many in the surrounding communities. He further stated that 14 new Swedish Republican Clubs had been organized in Chicago during the last few months in view of the pending general elections. The main speaker of the evening was Rev. Dr. C.A. Swensson from Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas. At first he spoke English, and later Swedish. He proved to be an orator of the first order and held his audience spell-bound from the beginning to the end. Clearly and in an interesting manner Rev. Swensson explained in details the principles of the Republican party in contrast to those of the Democratic party in the presidential campaign now being waged. But not only in national politics should the Swedes be Republicans, but also in state and local politics, where they have much to gain if they act in unison. Under a local Democratic regime the Swedes had been ignored and neglected! He concluded by reminding those present of the registrations to be held next Tuesday. Only those who register can vote.

    The mass meeting held last Thursday evening in Armory Hall, Battery D, was the largest and most successful meeting ever held by Swedish people in Chicago. More than 3000 people ...

    Swedish
    I F 2, I F 3, III B 1
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- September 25, 1906
    Labor and Politics (Editorial)

    In our opinion labor made a big mistake by deciding to ignore politics. In America the people are supposed to rule and those who ignore politics neglect their own duty.

    If the labor organization had one member at the central soat of government of each state and in the national governmental body, the interests of organized labor would be more conscientiously looked after and more efficiently handled. Partisanship could then be used to the advantage of labor, and better laws could have been made and enforced. As things are now, the existing laws are against labor. To accomplish anything, labor is forced to resort to wholly or nearly illegal methods.

    Several small reform parties have been organized from time to time; had there been affiliation and co-operation with them, labor would have been able to attain many of the advantages so strongly desired. Had this been done, not 2so many promises would have been broken by the big parties. Both the Democratic and the Republican parties have taken up reforms proposed by the Populists. Had labor joined with the Populists, the combined backing and influence would have put through many advantageous laws.

    A number of craft unions have decided to tie up with the Socialists, or, as it is known in Germany, the Social-Democratic Party. They say that both the Republican and the Democratic parties are parties of the capitalists; that is the reason why neither of these parties can or will do anything for the laboring class and the farmer. And what is more, the manufacturer, mine owner or railway magnate, wants cheap help so he can make some profit.

    The organization of a party is for the purpose of electing certain men to various offices and of having laws passed that are beneficial to the public in general and the party in particular. If labor, as one man, would join a party, they would be strong enough to have some authority, but scattered among several parties, they are helpless. If labor would enroll in one party they could demand and get promises from the candidates, which the party would not dare break.

    3

    True enough, there are sections of this country where the workingman dares not vote according to his judgment. If he votes contrary to the demands of the employer, he may be discharged for his independence or the plant in which he and others, who have gone against the boss, work, may be shut down, forcing the employees to pack up and go elsewhere in search of a living. Keeping out of politics cannot change such conditions. In order to win one must fight.

    In our opinion labor made a big mistake by deciding to ignore politics. In America the people are supposed to rule and those who ignore politics neglect their own duty. ...

    Swedish
    I D 2 a 2, I D 1 a, III B 1, I E
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- October 23, 1906
    Workers and Postal Savings Banks (Editorial)

    Of all civilized countries the United States is the only one which does not have postal savings banks. It is not hard to find the reason for this. It is the influence of the financial kings on our government and Congress that has hindered the establishment of such banks.

    The working class, especially, should put forth every effort to force the Federal Government to establish such banks without undue delay. They should also strongly advocate changes in laws regarding other savings banks so that the depositors would be adequately protected. The Stensland Bank is the latest and best example of a bank with no protection for the laborer's savings. The failure of this bank caused more deaths from shock, and suicides than has ever happened before in a bank crash.

    Often the factory worker cannot invest his savings in real estate. The 2factory may be shut down unexpectedly and the savings are as lost as though they were lost in a bank failure. If the worker has his own home, the employer can (and often has) take advantage of this by closing down, making it necessary for the laborer to go elsewhere to earn his living, and then the worker will find no one who is in a position to buy the house or the equity in it.

    If the worker has his savings deposited with the government the money is safe; no matter where he is forced to move, he has the right to withdraw his money as he may need it. If there is an argument regarding rate of wages he can move wherever he pleases, and he does not lose one cent.

    Insurance companies have also done their utmost to oppose the establishment of the postal savings banks. Their pet argument was to suggest the advantages of endowment policies. The recent insurance scandals have shown where a poor man's money goes.

    The postal savings bank will be a real help to the really poor man, as it 3permits him to open an account to which he may add deposits as small as ten cents and up at a time. The pennies make the dollar and in time the total amount saved is often somewhat surprising.

    The French postal savings banks are shown by statistics to be the greatest help that the poor workers have had the good fortune to obtain.

    My opinion is that the establishment of postal savings banks in the United States will be impossible unless the matter becomes a political issue. The strongest argument in favor of the banks will be the fight put up against them by our big bankers and other money magnates.

    The farmers, united with the populists, made a determined effort to bring about the reorganization of our banking system but the Bank Syndicate was too strong.

    The present prosperity may make many think that the postal savings bank is 4unnecessary and useless but history repeats itself; when a depression occurs again, the millions lost by the working class will be many, which they can ill afford to lose, while if the money were in the hands of our government not a cent of loss would be sustained by the poor man. Further discussion on this subject will appear in a future issue.

    Of all civilized countries the United States is the only one which does not have postal savings banks. It is not hard to find the reason for this. It is ...

    Swedish
    I H, I D 2 c, I D 1 a, III B 1, I F 6
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- September 13, 1910
    Old-Age Security (Editorial)

    The Swedish-American Congressman, Frederick Lundin, is the outstanding champion of old age security in the United States, and the arguments which he presented in his speech in the House of Representatives last June have reverberated throughout the country. It is evident that the Congressman has made a thorough study of this subject, and spared no trouble in collecting dependable and instructive data from countries where the pensioning of aged people is already in operation.

    This issue has already been on the agenda for a long time in several countries, but here in America we have not even made the preliminary motions. Congressman Lundin has proposed that a commission be appointed to study the question from all angles, and he intends, if re-elected, to continue his efforts in behalf of this cause.

    2

    The American social consciousness is not very alert in this respect, and the national conception of a just and equitable society is not clearly defined. It is, therefore, often easy for the financially strong to exploit those who are financially weak. In this country there is also an official attitude of indifference toward the hardships of old are, and a vigorous educational campaign is much needed: firstly, to inform the public as well as our officials of actual conditions among indigent old people, and, secondly, to let them know what other progressive countries are doing for their old people.

    There are signs that the public is becoming interested, and Congressman Lundin is receiving many sympathetic and encouraging messages. There is reason to believe that the commission, the appointment of which he proposed, will materialize in the near future.

    Quite a bit is being done through private efforts, but it is not adequate and it is not what we want. We want an official pension, granted as a right, not as charity. Under present conditions it is often humiliating and degrading 3for old people to apply for help, but a state pension, provided by law, will enable aged dependent persons, most of whom have worked hard all their lives, to face their declining years without fear of absolute destitution.

    The Swedish-American Congressman, Frederick Lundin, is the outstanding champion of old age security in the United States, and the arguments which he presented in his speech in the House of ...

    Swedish
    I H, III B 1, IV
  • Svenska Kuriren -- February 13, 1913
    Opposition to the Immigration Law

    A delegation of representatives of several nationalities here left for Washington, D. C., on February 5, for the purpose of seeing and urging President Taft to veto the new immigration measure passed upon by Congress.

    According to this new bill, every immigrant must be able to read and write in his or her own mother tongue. The delegation also represented the Foreign Newspaper Association with Chief Justice Harry Olson as chairman. He pointed out to the President that if this measure becomes a law only people from the cities in Sweden would emigrate, and not from the rural districts.

    "It would be more important," he said, "to investigate the immigrants' health than their education."

    A delegation of representatives of several nationalities here left for Washington, D. C., on February 5, for the purpose of seeing and urging President Taft to veto the new immigration ...

    Swedish
    III G, III B 1, I F 5
  • Svenska Kuriren -- February 26, 1914
    Monument in Memory of Captain John Ericsson

    It has been suggested that a monument be erected in honor of Captain John Ericsson, the constructor and builder of The Monitor. The Hon. John J. Fitzgerald of New York has introduced a bill in the United States Congress, calling for an appropriation of $100,000 for the purpose.

    The following resolution was passed at the regular meeting of the Grand Lodge of the Order of Viking on February 14 in Chicago:

    "Whereas it has come to our notice, that a bill has been introduced in the U. S. Congress by the Hon. John J. Fitzgerald of New York, calling for an appropriation of $100,000 for the purpose of erecting a monument in memory of the constructor and builder of the 'Monitor,' Capt. John Ericsson, and

    "Whereas it is the sense of this body of patriotic Swedish-Americans 2that a nation as great and rich as ours should in some fitting way honor the memory of those men who in the hour of need did some great service to the country, and

    "Whereas Capt. John Ericsson, through the building of the 'Monitor' not only checked 'Merrimac's' triumphant path towards the North, but also revolutionized naval warfare, therefore,

    "Be it resolved that the Independent Order of Vikings, in convention assembled in the City of Chicago on the 14th day of February, 1914, commend this bill, and urgently and respectfully request all Swedish-American Societies to urge their respective Honorable U. S. Senators and Honorable U. S. Representatives to favor this bill in honor of our illustrious countryman, and further

    "Be it resolved, that a copy of this resolution be furnished to each 3delegate of this convention to be forwarded to his respective Honorable U. S. Senator and Honorable U. S. Representative, a copy also to be forwarded by the Grand Lodge to the two Honorable U. S. Senators of Illinois and each Honorable Representative of Chicago, and further

    "Be it resolved that this resolution be printed in the Vikingen, our official organ, and released to the Swedish-American press, and further

    "Be it resolved that we urge all subordinate lodges to pass similar resolutions and forward same to proper parties."

    It has been suggested that a monument be erected in honor of Captain John Ericsson, the constructor and builder of The Monitor. The Hon. John J. Fitzgerald of New York ...

    Swedish
    II C, III B 4, III B 1, I F 4
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- October 27, 1920
    The Presidential Election (Editorial)

    Election day is close at hand. Next Tuesday, November 2, the battle at the polls will take place, and it will be decided who will be president of the United States for the next four years. The final decision rests in the hands of the people, and it is the duty, inherent in citizenship, of all men and women who have the privilege of voting to cast their ballot. The election is an important one for the American nation, and the result may have far-reaching implications. It is always difficult to predict the outcome of an American presidential election with any degree of certainty, but it seems to us that at the present time all signs indicate a Republican victory.

    The Democratic party has been at the helm during the last eight years, and it 2should be admitted that its leaders can point to certain accomplishments. But the great mass of our people seems to have tired of the Democratic administration, which certainly has erred in many respects, and to have made up its mind that the Republicans are entitled to an opportunity to show what they can do. Such a change of administration is altogether desirable in these rapidly changing times. The policies of the Republican party are based on a solid foundation, and its banner carrier, the intelligent, experienced, and careful Senator Warren G. Harding, certainly is well fitted to steer the ship of state through the dangerous narrows.

    To-day the United States is standing at the crossroads, and it is of the utmost importance that we choose the right course. The alliance known as the League of Nations, which was founded by the great powers after the World War, has assigned to itself a kind of police authority, for the purpose of directing the conduct of nations from its headquarters in Europe.

    The Democratic presidential candidate advocates America's unqualified membership 3in the League, while the Republican candidate takes the stand that we should stay out of it under its present setup, because by joining at this time we would jeopardize the freedom of action of the United States.

    World peace is close to the heart of Senator Harding, and he is a strong advocate of American participation in the reconstruction of the war-torn world, and of the liberation of humanity from the misery of recurrent wars. He favors co-operation among all nations for that purpose, but believes that the goal can best be reached through voluntary agreements; and that this nation should be left entirely free to act according to its own judgment and conscience, without having to yield to outside pressure of any kind. We are in full agreement with this point of view. It seems to us that this stand offers the best chance for a happy solution of the world's problems.

    As regards our internal national policies, Senator Harding has proposed a 4reconstruction program containing the following main points:

    Laws and regulations which only cause confusion and misunderstandings should be abolished.

    Our tariff laws must be changed and improved, to better fulfill their purpose.

    Our tax system must be revised and improved. Excessive profits should be heavily taxed.

    Bureaucratic control and unnecessary experimentation must cease.

    Closer co-operation between government and business must be brought about in order to promote domestic as well as foreign trade.

    5

    Our merchant marine should be enlarged, and subsidized if necessary.

    The mail service must be improved. The merit system should be introduced in the appointment of federal employees. Ability should be rewarded, and unnecessary services abolished. Duplication and overlapping of work within the various departments of the Government must be avoided. Experts should be consulted in order to improve administrative efficiency.

    These are some of the outstanding points in Senator Harding's program, and they may all be summed up in the slogan "America first." That is the essence of his ideas of government, and it carries a real appeal to the American people. That is the reason why the Senator enjoys an even greater popularity today than he did at the beginning of the campaign; and if we have gauged the sentiment throughout the country correctly, his victory on election day is assured.

    Election day is close at hand. Next Tuesday, November 2, the battle at the polls will take place, and it will be decided who will be president of the United ...

    Swedish
    III B 1, I G, I H
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- April 10, 1929
    Oppose the National Origins Provision Let the Congress Know That You Consider the Law Impractical and Unfair

    The addition of the national origins provision to the Immigration Act of 1924 has been postponed twice because it was considered impractical as a basis for the computation of immigration quotas. But it will go into effect next July 1 unless the Congress, when it meets in extra session next month, votes another postponement or decides to abolish the provision altogether.

    If the new law should become effective, Sweden's quota will be reduced by two thirds, to 3,314, a reduction of about 6,000 in the present quota. If this law had been properly prepared on a basis of justice and fairness, no Swedish-American would object to it. But it has been clearly established that the law is impractical, that it is not based on realities, and that the quotas computed according to it are the results of guesswork. On the other hand, it is generally recognized that the present quotas are so 2adjusted as to serve America's best interests, and are arrived at by sound reasoning.

    It is, therefore, the duty of all citizens who agree with President Hoover that the National Origins provision represents an ill-conceived idea, and should not become law, to let the proper authorities know what they think about it. They can best do so by writing their representatives in Washington and ask them to vote for repeal of the law or for another postponement. In order to make it easier for our countrymen to voice their displeasure over this law, we are printing below two form letters, which should be addressed to Senators and Congressmen. Copy them and send them to Washington D. C. [Translator's note of the letters are of course in English in the original.]

    (Date)

    Hon.

    (Name of Senator)

    United States Senate.

    Washington, D. C.

    3

    As one of your constituents, I ask that you vote for the repeal of the National Origins provision of the Immigration Act and for the continuance of the quotas based on two per cent of the 1890 census, thereby supporting the President in his opinion on this question.

    (Name)

    (Address)

    (Date)

    Hon.

    (Name of Congressman)

    House of Representatives,

    Washington, D. C.

    4

    Being one of your constituents, I strongly urge that you give all possible support to the President by voting for the repeal of the National Origins provision of the Immigration Act and for the retention of the quotas based on the 1890 census.

    (Name)

    (Address)

    The addition of the national origins provision to the Immigration Act of 1924 has been postponed twice because it was considered impractical as a basis for the computation of immigration ...

    Swedish
    III G, III B 1