The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- July 25, 1882
    Murder

    Two Swedes, Robert Hilding and John Robinson, were arrested a couple of days ago on a charge of burglary. After being booked, Hilding confessed to Lieutenant Steele that he and Robinson had murdered a young woman in Stockholm on December 1, 1875. A merchant, Perault, paid Hilding five hundred crowns for murdering the young woman. The girls name was Sophia Dahlberg, she was strangled to death with a cord, in the good old East Indian fashion.

    The two murderers will be extradited to the Swedish police some time in September. Of course, the Swedish Government will pay all expenses.

    Two Swedes, Robert Hilding and John Robinson, were arrested a couple of days ago on a charge of burglary. After being booked, Hilding confessed to Lieutenant Steele that he and ...

    Swedish
    III H, II E 2
  • Skandinaven -- March 07, 1889
    Kidnapped

    Fannie Eckstrom, 2928 South La Salle Street, has had Phillip S. Austin arrested and charged with kidnapping. Austin forced Fannie to live in a room at his hotel at 167 West Madison Street. Here he and his friends would visit her and force her to have intercourse against her will.

    Fannie Eckstrom, 2928 South La Salle Street, has had Phillip S. Austin arrested and charged with kidnapping. Austin forced Fannie to live in a room at his hotel at 167 ...

    Swedish
    II E 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 02, 1890
    [Starving Man Steals]

    Charles H. Johnson, a Swedish laborer, the other day went into Bartholdy's hardware store at 240 W. Chicago, Avenue and asked the woman behind the counter for some money. When he was refused, he grabbed hold of a large tin kettle and walked out with it. Upon being arrested he said that he had stolen for the purpose of being sent to Bridewell, where he would get food. He had not worked for four months and was starving.

    Charles H. Johnson, a Swedish laborer, the other day went into Bartholdy's hardware store at 240 W. Chicago, Avenue and asked the woman behind the counter for some money. When ...

    Swedish
    II E 2, I D 2 c
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 01, 1890
    A Gambling House Episode.

    Our countryman, Charles Johnson, has sued George Hankins, a gambling-house proprietor, to recover a sum of $600. that Johnson claimed he lost in Hankin's place on April 1,1889. On the same grounds Mrs. Johnson has brought suit for $2,000. The fact that it is possible to bring forth so many law-suits on the same item is explained by the peculiarity of our laws, which state:

    If the person losing the money does not present his claim within six months from the date of the loss, any one may sue the proprietor of the gambling house for a sum equal to three times the amount of the original loss.

    Mr. Johnson formerly was the proprietor of the Larson Furniture Company of this city.

    Our countryman, Charles Johnson, has sued George Hankins, a gambling-house proprietor, to recover a sum of $600. that Johnson claimed he lost in Hankin's place on April 1,1889. On the ...

    Swedish
    II E 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 12, 1890
    Swede Murdered

    Walter Jacobson, about thirty years old, and residing at 110 Sholto St., was arrested last Sunday morning for the murder of James Johnson, a painter, of 38 Sholto St. These two men, in the company of three others, had spent Saturday night drinking and carousing in the saloon located at the corner of Sholto and Gurley Sts., and which is owned by Michael Dalton. They had imbibed so freely that finally one after another fell asleep in chairs or on the floor. Around seven o'clock in the morning they were about to resume their beer drinking. It was at this time that somebody dropped a glass on the floor, which somehow aroused Jacobson's anger. A quarrel ensued, during which Jacobson pulled a knife and lunged toward the saloon-keeper. He tripped and fell against Johnson, however, and the quarrel was now between these two men. All of a sudden Jacobson thrust his knife into Johnson's chest. Then he left the saloon and went home to try to sleep. The witnesses to the tragic incident were all so intoxicated and so apathetic from the night's orgy that they did not even think of sending for help for the wounded man, who succumbed before medical aid finally was 2summoned. Johnson's arrest took place at nine o'clock the same morning. He is married and has two children.

    The July 24, 1890 issue of the Swedish Tribune relates the sentencing of Walter Jacobson by Judge Altgeld to five years of hard labor. The verdict was manslaughter.

    Walter Jacobson, about thirty years old, and residing at 110 Sholto St., was arrested last Sunday morning for the murder of James Johnson, a painter, of 38 Sholto St. These ...

    Swedish
    II E 2
  • Skandinaven -- July 10, 1890
    A Vicious "Concert Hall"

    A few weeks ago, T. M. Swanson opened a so-called "Concert Hall" at 226 Milwaukee Avenue. It did not take the Police long to find out what really was going on there.

    C. Williams and O. E. Little, agents for the Illinois Humane Society, arrested Swanson, on the charge of permitting girls under fourteen years to frequent his saloon.

    Swanson had a stage erected in the back of his Tap room, where these girls, none of them over twelve years, would dance and sing. Later, they had to mingle with the patrons, to drink and dance with the men.

    Most of the customers were pimps, prostitutes, and crooks of every description.

    Such dens are to be found all over the city. It is high time that these "Joints" be closed. The Humane Society is doing its part, but the Police, as usual, are very lax.

    A few weeks ago, T. M. Swanson opened a so-called "Concert Hall" at 226 Milwaukee Avenue. It did not take the Police long to find out what really was going ...

    Swedish
    II E 2, II E 3
  • Skandinaven -- January 31, 1897
    Green Goods Man

    John Alfred Skoog, who gave the aliases of Charles Bennet and Zukowski, was arrested late last night when caught passing counterfeit twenty-dollar bills.

    Skoog stated that he had passed about thirty of the spurious bills last Thursday. The police went to his home at 4931 Justine Street where they found quite an elaborate counterfeiting outfit, also, one hundred and fifty dollars in good currency and a bank book with several hundred dollars. After searching the house, they also found a great bundle of counterfeit money; the money was so well made that there was some argument as to whether it was good money or bad money.

    Skoog told the police that he had learned his trade in Stockholm where he had made quite a number of eight-hundred crown bills; he was caught and served six years there.

    John Alfred Skoog, who gave the aliases of Charles Bennet and Zukowski, was arrested late last night when caught passing counterfeit twenty-dollar bills. Skoog stated that he had passed about ...

    Swedish
    II E 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 03, 1901
    Fred Hanson Guilty

    p.11...... Fred Hanson, who, on December ninth, last year, shot and killed Edward O'Connor in a room at 164 Ontario St., was declared guilty of manslaughter in the second degree last Friday, by a jury in Judge Tuley's Court. Punishment for this crime is, according to criminal laws, from fourteen to twenty years at hard labor.

    The criminal is of Swedish heritage. He was born in Iowa in 1875, but has lived in Minneapolis for nineteen years. He came to Chicago in the early part of September last year. Jealousy motivated the crime. Both men were in love with the same girl. The murder was committed in her room.

    p.11...... Fred Hanson, who, on December ninth, last year, shot and killed Edward O'Connor in a room at 164 Ontario St., was declared guilty of manslaughter in the second degree ...

    Swedish
    II E 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 15, 1901
    Actions Speak Louder Than Words. (Editorial)

    p.11...Chief of Police O'Neill permitted Ike Rosen's saloon to be closed one day last week. The saloon is an infamous nest in the Levee-district. A person was robbed in the saloon and by order of the chief of police the saloon-keeper was relieved of his license. Rosen turned to "Hinky Dink" Kenna, alderman of the first ward, who at once went to the mayor and without much cermony prevailed on him to return Rosen's license. If this has any meaning at all it is this, of course, that the mayor's words about the chief of police having complete freedom is a deviation from the truth. Much has of late been said and written about the corruptness within the city's police department, and by the above mentioned incident one can draw one's own conclusions as to the cause for the evil complained of. Clearly, the chief of police stands powerless and the responsibility for the laxity in 2regard to the saloon-element and the reigning lawlessness must be placed on the mayor, and in the case mentioned even on Kenna, who appears to wield the sceptre in the First Ward. This was also the opinion expressed by the daily newspapers, when they took the Rosen case into consideration. This prompted the mayor to give fuller information concerning his action. According to him no misunderstanding prevails between him and the chief of police, that the latter had nothing to do with the saloon-matter, that alderman Kenna did not at all seek to make his influence felt for Rosen's benefit, that no robbery had taken place at the saloon, and for these reasons it would not have been right not to return Kenna's license, etc.

    Naturally, the explanations were lined with many phrases, but it is doubtful whether the mayor has thereby succeeded in fooling thinking people. Actions speak louder than words.

    p.11...Chief of Police O'Neill permitted Ike Rosen's saloon to be closed one day last week. The saloon is an infamous nest in the Levee-district. A person was robbed in the ...

    Swedish
    I F 6, II E 1, II E 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- April 21, 1903
    Rid Chicago of its Shady Liquor Places (Editorial)

    Once more a Swede has been killed in one of the many saloons in the city. The crime took place at 55 East Chicago Avenue where George Johnson and William Peterson are conducting a saloon. Last Friday, about noon, Fred Johnson, a laborer, living at 196 Gault Court, went into the saloon in company with a blind man by the name of Borjeson. Johnson ordered a couple of drinks, paying for them. Shortly afterwards, Charles Bowman came into the saloon. He is conducting a one man affair at 85 East Chicago Avenue. A few remarks were exchanged between Fred Johnson and Bowman, whether pleasant or not was not known by the only men who witnessed the crime; namely, one Sam Anderson, and the saloon-keeper, Peter Johnson. Then Bowman pushed at Fred Johnson, and in answer, the latter's fist hit Bowman in the face. The saloonkeeper separated the two men, but Fred Johnson came back at Bowman, threatening to give him a beating. In return, Bowman pulled out his gun and fired two shots at his antagonist. Johnson was hurt, but not fatally, as it seemed at first. Later in the afternoon he was taken to the police hospital where he 2died at 8 P. M. the same day. Bowman gave himself up at the East Chicago Avenue police station. At the coroner's inquest on Saturday afternoon, Bowman was ordered held over to the grand jury...

    The murdered man was born in Sweden thirty-one years ago, and at the age of ten years came to Chicago with his parents. He was married and leaves a widow and three children, also his aged mother. His home is at 196 Gault Court. It is said that he was of peaceful nature, never starting trouble. His great fault was his too great love of liquor.

    The man who is accused of the crime is also a man in his best years. In the past he has conducted a saloon business in the same place where he shot Johnson last Friday, but a year ago his license was revoked on account of another murder which took place in his saloon shortly before. The victim at that time was the twenty-three year old Lillian Buttler, who was shot and killed by a Swede, Fred Carlson. Shortly afterwards Bowman had his license renewed, and opened a saloon at 85 Chicago Avenue. It is asserted that 3Johnson and Bowman were never on terms of friendship.

    The many liquor stores have made Chicago Avenue a street which is feared and despised by peaceful citizens. The few respectable swedes who are yet conducting business there are most keenly aware of this fact. Many of the houses on the street are now occupied by drunkards, thugs, and other persons of a shady type. They are the living results of the saloons of the street. If the government of our city would revoke some of the liquor licenses issued on the street in question, Chicago Avenue might yet become the type of street which it once was, and not a place to be feared and despised.

    Once more a Swede has been killed in one of the many saloons in the city. The crime took place at 55 East Chicago Avenue where George Johnson and William ...

    Swedish
    I B 1, II E 2, I F 6