The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 08, 1901
    The Swedish Organizations

    p.10......Svenska Glee Klubben (The Swedish Glee Club), 470 LaSalle Avenue.

    Svithiod Singing Society, 120 East Chicago Avenue.

    Fria Svenska Arbets Byran (The Free Swedish Employment Bureau), 78 Dearborn Street, rooms 15 and 17, telephone Central 2687, open every day except holidays from nine A.M. to four P.M. Employers in need of help should kindly apply here.

    For Bundet Gustaf II Adolf (The Gustavus Adolfus II Society) meets at Phoenix Hall, 324 East Division Street, the second and fourth Wednesday, each month.

    2

    Foreningen Baltic (The Baltic Society) meets the first and third Tuesday of the month at Masonic Hall, Grand Crossing.

    Independent Order of Vikings, Logen Vikingarne (Viking Lodge) Number One I.O.V. holds a general meeting at Odd Fellows Hall, 120 East Chicago Avenue, the first and third Thursday of each month.

    Foreningen Norden (The North Society) meets at Hopkins Hall, 528 63rd Street, the second and fourth Thursday of each month.

    Forsta Svenska Byggnads-Osch Lane Foreningen (First Swedish Building and Loan Association). Head Office and Meeting Room: 161 Washington Street, room 808. Monthly meetings: the third Monday of each month. Lake View office: 1836 North Clark Street. Open the first and third Thursday evenings. Roseland office: 111045 Michigan Avenue, Roseland. Open the last Wednesday evening of each month.

    3

    Foreningen Monitor (The Monitor Society) meets at Mahony Hall, corner of Sixty-third and Halsted Streets, the first and third Wednesday of each month.

    Vikingarnes Gymnastik-Och Fakt Klubb (The Viking Gymnastic and Fencing Club) holds its exercises each Tuedsay and Friday at its club-house, 913 Sheffield Avenue.

    Logen Brage (Brage Lodge) Number Three, I.O.V. holds its general meeting at Phoenix Hall, 324 East Division Street, the second and fourth Thursday of each month.

    Logen Drake (Drake Lodge) Number Three, I.O.V. holds its general meeting at Wells Hall, 1631 North Wells Street, the first and third Thursday of each month.

    Logen Agantyr (Agantyr Lodge) Number Four, I.O.V. holds its general meeting at Wismes Hall, corner of Thirty-fifth and Wood Streets, the first and third Sunday of each month.

    4

    Logen Frej (Frej Lodge) Number Five, I.O.V. holds its general meeting at Linnea Hall, corner of Buffalo Avenue and Eighty-eighth Street, the second and fourth Wednesday of each month.

    Logen Frithiof (Frithiof Lodge) Number Six, I.O.V. holds its general meeting at Heim's Hall, corner of Lincoln and Graceland Avenues, the second and fourth Wednesday of each month.

    Logen Runan (Runan Lodge) Number Seven, I.O.V. holds its general meeting at Kerwin's Hall, Southwest corner of Garfield Boulevard and Wentworth Avehue, the second and fourth Thursday of each month.

    Logen Fridhem (Peaceful Home Lodge) Number 360, I.O.G.T. meets at 1748 Diversey Boulevard, each Saturday evening.

    5

    Logen Hoppets Har (Hope's Host Lodge) Number 441, I.O.G.T. meets at Oakley Hall, 1141 South Oakley Avenue, each Saturday evening.

    Logen Idoghet (Industry Lodge) I.O.G.T. meets at Little Phoenix Hall, 324 East Division Street, at seven-thirty P.M. each Sunday.

    Logen Jupiter (Jupiter Lodge) I.O.G.T. meets at Phoenix Hall, 324 East Division Street, at seven-thirty P.M. each Sunday.

    Logen Kronan (Crown Lodge) Number 832, I.O.G.T. meets each Sunday evening at seven-thirty, Linnea Hall, 8743 Buffalo Avenue, South Chicago.

    Logen Svenskarne I Illinois (Swedes of Illinois Lodge) Number 258, I.O.G.T. meets each Sunday at four P.M. Jaeger Hall, Clybourn Avenue and Larrabbee Street.

    6

    Logen Verdandi (Verdandi Lodge) Number One, I.O.G.T. meets at K. of P. Hall, third floor, Arcade Building, Pullman, each Sunday, four-thirty P.M.

    Norden Athletic Club meets at 958 Belmont Avenue, corner of Southport Avenue, every Tuesday and Friday evening.

    Odin Lodge, Number 103, K. of P. meets at the North Side Turner Hall, North Clark Street, every Tuesday evening.

    Skandinaviska Bagare Foreningen (Scandinavian Baker's Society) Number Sixty-two, I.B.C.U. meets at Hert's Hall, corner of Townsend and Locust Streets, the second and fourth Saturday of each month at seven-thirty P.M.

    Skandinaviska Foreningen Enighet (Scandinavian Unity Society) meets at Ahlgrim's Hall, Twenty-second and Robey Streets, the second and fourth Thursday of each month.

    7

    Svenska Amerikanska Gardet (Swedish American Guards) meets at Bromstedt's Hall, corner of Sixty-third and Halsted Streets, every Tuesday evening.

    Foreningen Ingeborg (Swedish Ladies' Society Ingeborg) meets at the South Side Turner Hall, Thirty-first Street, the first and third Wednesday of each month.

    Svenska National Forbundet (Swedish National Society) meets at Seventy-eight Dearborn Street, the first Tuesday of each month.

    Svenska Gymnastik-Och Atlet Klubben (The Swedish Athletic and Gymnastic Club) meets every Tuesday and Friday evening at Columbia Hall, 5326 State Street.

    Svenska Vanner's Sjuk-Forening (Swedish Friends' Sick Benefit Society) meets the second Wednesday of each month at the Swedish Methodist Church, corner of Thirty-third and Fifth Avenue, at eight P. M.

    8

    I.O.S. Storlogen (I.O.S. Grand Lodge Svithiod) meets jointly the second Wednesday in February, every year. The Grand Lodge's Secretary's Hall at Seventy-three Sedgwick Street is open every Wednesday evening seven to nine P.M.

    Svithiod Logen (Svithiod Lodge) Number One, I.O.S. meets at North Side Turner Hall, every Saturday evening.

    Manhem Logen (Manhem Lodge) Number Two, I.O.S. meets at Waswo Hall, 197 West Division Street, every Thursday evening.

    Verdandi Logen (Verdandi Lodge) Number Three, I.O.S. meets at Wells Hall, 1629 North Clark Street, corner of Fletcher Street, the first and third Saturday of each month.

    Mimer Logen (Mimer Lodge) Number Four, I.O.S. meets at Edgewood Hall, 1930 Milwaukee Avenue, the first and third Thursday of each month.

    9

    Frithiof Logen (Frithiof Lodge) Number Five, I.O.U. meets at Leddy's Hall, corner of Wentworth Avenue and Thirty-first Street, the first and third Tuesday of each month, eight P.M.

    Gylfe Logen (Gylfe Lodge) Number Six, I.O.S. meets at Linea Hall, 8743 Buffalo Avenue, the first and third Tuesday of each month.

    Bjorn Logen (Bear Lodge) Number Seven, I.O.S. meets at Wm. Moss Hall, East Chicago, Indiana, the first and third Saturday of each month.

    Ring Logen (Ring Lodge) Number Eight, I.O.S. meets at Phoenix Hall, 324 East Division Street, the first and third Wednesday of each month.

    Hilding Logen (Hilding Lodge) Number Nine, I.O.S. meets at the corner of One-hundred and eleventh Street and Michigan Avenue, every Wednesday evening, eight P.M.

    10

    Odin Logen (Odin Lodge) Number Ten, I.O.S. meets at Odd Fellows Hall, Chicago Street, Joliet, Illinois, the second and fourth Friday, each month.

    Thor Logen (Thor Lodge) Number Eleven, I.O.S. meets at Walter's Hall, Chicago Heights, Illinois, the first and third Wednesday of each month.

    Balder Logen (Balder Lodge) Number Twelve, I.O.S. meets at Fifty-first and Armitage Avenue, Cragin, the second and fourth Thursday of each month.

    Logen Svea (Svea Lodge) Number Fourteen, I.O.S. meets the first and third Friday of each month, eight P.M. at Odd Fellows Hall, corner of One-hundred and nineteenth Street and Wallace, West Pullman.

    Stockholm Logen (Stockholm Lodge) Number Thirteen, I.O.S. meets the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at eight P.M. at Oakley Hall, 1144 South Oakley, Avenue.

    (I.O.V. - Independent Order of Svithiod.)

    p.10......Svenska Glee Klubben (The Swedish Glee Club), 470 LaSalle Avenue. Svithiod Singing Society, 120 East Chicago Avenue. Fria Svenska Arbets Byran (The Free Swedish Employment Bureau), 78 Dearborn Street, rooms ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 1 a, II D 1, II D 2, II D 8, II B 3, I B 1
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 01, 1902
    The Swedish National Society

    The Swedish National Society, a well-known benevolent Society, has been very successful in helping needy countrymen during the past year. Over a thousand men and six hundred women have received employment during last year through the efforts of the Society. Over $1,100 has been distributed to poor people. The society is supported from the income of its Midsummer outdoor festivals and winter feasts at the Auditorium. Such a feast will be held there this year on February 6.

    The Swedish National Society, a well-known benevolent Society, has been very successful in helping needy countrymen during the past year. Over a thousand men and six hundred women have received ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, II D 8
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 29, 1902
    The Swedish National Society

    One of the most active organizations in the field of helping our needy countrymen in Chicago is The Swedish National Society. Last year it distributed $1,200 to the poor not to mention the activity of its free employment bureau. The society is now making plans for a midwinter festival to be held at the Auditorium Feb. 6, when a Swedish historical play will be presented.

    One of the most active organizations in the field of helping our needy countrymen in Chicago is The Swedish National Society. Last year it distributed $1,200 to the poor not ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, II B 1 c 1, III B 2, II D 8
  • Svenska Tribunen -- December 10, 1902
    [Some Good Work]

    The Swedish National Society through its free employment bureau, procured work for two hundred persons during the last month. It also donated $75 to needy Swedes in Chicago.

    The Swedish National Society through its free employment bureau, procured work for two hundred persons during the last month. It also donated $75 to needy Swedes in Chicago.

    Swedish
    II D 8, II D 10
  • Svenska Nyheter -- May 12, 1903
    Swedish National Association's Employment Bureau

    During the month of April, the free employment bureau of the Swedish National Association succeeded in placing 291 men and 75 women, a total of 366. Some people may hold that at present it is not very difficult to get employment for people, and this is true to a certain degree. On the other hand, it should be remembered that the majority of the men and women who have found employment through the activity of the Bureau have come to this country only recently, and on account of their lack of knowledge of the English language in all probability would have had considerable difficulty in securing employment were it not for the Bureau's assistance.

    During the month of April, the free employment bureau of the Swedish National Association succeeded in placing 291 men and 75 women, a total of 366. Some people may hold ...

    Swedish
    II D 8
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 09, 1903
    [Swedish National Association's Employment Bureau]

    The free employment bureau of the Swedish National Association during the month of May has succeeded in placing 225 men and 120 women, a total of 345 persons. This is the largest number of jobless ever to find employment in one month through the efforts of the Bureau.

    The free employment bureau of the Swedish National Association during the month of May has succeeded in placing 225 men and 120 women, a total of 345 persons. This is ...

    Swedish
    II D 8
  • Svenska Nyheter -- August 11, 1903
    Swedish National Association's Employment Bureau

    At the Swedish National Association's meeting last Tuesday, the directors of the free employment bureau maintained by the Association reported that during the month of July, employment had been provided for one hundred and eighty-nine men and seventy-three women. The association decided to hold its customary mid-winter festival at the Auditorium in the month of February, and to hold its great annual summer festival on Sunday June 26, 1904, at Elliott's Park.

    At the Swedish National Association's meeting last Tuesday, the directors of the free employment bureau maintained by the Association reported that during the month of July, employment had been provided ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, II D 8
  • Svenska Nyheter -- December 22, 1903
    [Report Of] Swedish National Association.

    The Swedish National Association, strong and powerful by virtue of the combined support of the Swedes in Chicago, is responsible to the Swedish-speaking population in Chicago for the activities of the Association, and for this reason begs to present to its friends and supporters a few leaves [from the book] of its history and activities during the past year.

    Through the free employment bureau maintained by the Association, 3,367 Swedes have gained employment--2,305 men and 1,062 women. In many cases, the applicants were unfamiliar with the language of our country, and for these especially, the need for employment was imperative. The minimum cost of gaining employment through some agency rendering the service for a fee could not be less than two dollars per applicant, or $6,734 for the entire number. The value of the activity of the Association along these lines is therefore easily recognized.

    2

    The Association extends a helping hand to many destitute Swedes. During the past year, aid has been rendered in 208 cases to the total amount of $910.65. Widows and abandoned wives with many children have always been given the preference when aid was to be granted. The destitute in Norrland, Sweden were aided with $354, and an elderly unemployed man was provided for at the Home of Mercy in Bowmansville.

    In hundreds of other ways the Association has aided needy Swedes,both men and women. Ailing people have been sent to Colorade, to California, to Oregon, and to the southern States, there to regain their health and strength. Some have been sent home to Sweden to recuperate. Swedes lacking employment have been sent, without cost to them,to Minnesota, Nebraska, and other States, where the Assoication had secured work for them.

    To the extent possible with the means at its command, the Association has given clothes, lodging, and food to Swedes who were in need.

    3

    The Swedish National Association has always done its best to assist unfortunate compatriots. As is well known, the Association has made efforts to obtain a new trial for John Nordgren, who has been found guilty of murdering his wife. Strong doubts were felt as to the guilt of John Nordgren, but Judge Chetlain refused to grant a new trial. The Association has appealed his decision. The expenses in connection with the appeal will amount to about two thousand dollars.

    The activities of the Association are being supported exclusively by the funds accruing from the two great annual festivals arranged by the Association: the midsummer festival, held annually in one of the attractive parks in the neighborhood of the city and usually attended by some ten to twenty thousand people; and the midwinter festival, held annually in the Auditorum, the largest and most expensive theater in the city. Through their attendance at these festivals, our Swedish-Americans become supporters of the worthy activities carried on by the Association.

    4

    On the tenth and eleventh of February, the famous play by Jules Verne, "Around the World in Eighty Days", will be presented by the Association as the midwinter festival play. We welcome all Swedish-Americans to this festival, and in the name of the sick and the poor among our compatriots in the city, we express in advance our gratitude to all those who will attend.

    The Swedish National Association, strong and powerful by virtue of the combined support of the Swedes in Chicago, is responsible to the Swedish-speaking population in Chicago for the activities of ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, II D 7, II D 8, II D 10
  • Svenska Nyheter -- May 10, 1904
    Jobs to Be Had

    The free employment agency sponsored by the Swedish National League has placed during the month of April 385 job-seekers, of which 283 were men and 102 women.

    The free employment agency sponsored by the Swedish National League has placed during the month of April 385 job-seekers, of which 283 were men and 102 women.

    Swedish
    II D 8
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 14, 1904
    The National League (Editorial)

    Ten years ago the Swedish National League was organized in Chicago, and there are many reasons why we consider it both a pleasure and a duty to point out some of the important and beneficial activities in which the League has been engaged during this last decade.

    It grew from the committee which early in 1894 was appointed for the purpose of bringing to justice the two police officers who on Christmas eve, 1893, shot and killed a Swede by the name of Swan Nelson. Already before this purpose was accomplished, the members of the committee organized the Swedish National League, which took over the committee's work and completed it to the full satisfaction of the Swedish-American public. The trial cost the so-called Swan Nelson Committee and the National League close to eight thousand dollars, and this sum was obtained partly from the proceeds of entertainments of various kinds, 2partly through voluntary donations by poor but determined Swedish-Americans.

    When the trial was over, Chicago's Swedes were justly proud of a job well done, and the American press gave them credit for having accomplished what had never been done before--bringing about the conviction of two Irish police officers charged with murder, but acquitted at the first trial. At the second trial they were found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years in the penitentiary. The newspapers were jubilant, and from then on the League's future was assured.

    During the ten years of its existence, the League has taken a hand in two other somewhat similar cases. One was the trial of Anton Nelson, charged with having caused the death of a young man. Aided by its attorneys, G. Bernhard Anderson and O. C. Peterson, the League succeeded in obtaining his acquittal. The other is the so-called Nordgren case. John Nordgren has been found guilty of murdering his wife and sentenced to fourteen years in prison. But the League has come to his aid, and 3is trying to obtain a new trial, since there is reason to believe that he is innocent of this crime, and that his conviction was due to the incompetence of his lawyer.

    Already early in its existence, the leaders of this organization, which then as now consisted of representatives from Swedish societies in Chicago, realized the desirability, even necessity, of a free employment service through which Swedish men and women might obtain jobs. Again it was up to the League, which tackled the problem with energy and enthusiasm. The undertaking involved a considerable risk, since it was necessary to rent a centrally located office and hire a manager, which requires cash. The League's bank account, like that of all benevolent societies, was low. However, those of the members who had a little money came to its aid; the employment service was established, and within a short time it prospered. It has been a blessing to thousands of our countrymen and women.

    Swedish immigrants arrived here without knowing the language and unfamiliar 4with American working methods. Times were what we consider bad, and jobs scarce. Here and there "slave traders" (we call them so because this type of employment agencies, remaining outside of the jurisdiction of the state, accept the customer's money on the promise of furnishing a job without delivering) had pitched their tents, conniving with the large employers, particularly the railroad companies, concerning with the large employers, particularly the railroad companies, concerning the amount and price of the "merchandise" they were to deliver. A worker who could produce a couple of dollars would gladly lay them down, hoping that they would buy a job, but as a rule they bought only disappointment.

    The Swedish Free Employment Agency fought bitterly against these racketeers, and with considerable success. Gradually the employers came to realize that this agency could and did give them better service than any other; requests for Swedish workers increased rapidly from farmers, manufacturers, wholesalers, railroads, etc., and today it enjoys an enviable reputation for efficiency and fair dealing. During last April and May it placed 5857 persons--568 men and 289 women.

    During all these years Mrs. Othelia Myhrman has been the manager of the agency. She has been reappointed repeatedly to the position by the board of directors, and to her should go the lion's share of the credit for its success.

    It is true, particularly in a city like Chicago, with two million inhabitants, that "the poor are always with us," and a considerable number of the city's 130,000 Swedes belong to this category, depending to a large extent on the kindness and help of others. Sickness, suffering, and discouragement are frequent guests in their homes. The helping hand of the Swedish National League also reaches this section of our people. One cannot count how many sighs have been transformed into smiles, how many hungry mouths fed, or how many unhappy hearts comforted by the League's permanent relief committee during the past ten years. Some twenty-eight thousand dollars has been distributed among needy Swedish families, and in addition to that, assistance of various kinds, worth 6many times as much, has been rendered. We will only mention the many sick and poor people for whom reduced rates have been obtained on railways and ocean liners, and the many incurables who have been placed in homes and sanitariums. Only one who has been following the League's activities through the years can fully appreciate the value of its work.

    The uninitiated may ask where the money for all these charitable activities comes from, inasmuch as no reimbursement is asked for or accepted from those who have received aid in any form. Likely as not, the questioner himself has made his contribution. Everyone who attends affairs arranged by the League is helping in its work. If you attend one of its concerts in the Auditorium, or if you go on one of its picnics during the summer, then you are helping to make it what it is--the greatest Swedish organization in Chicago.

    Ten years ago the Swedish National League was organized in Chicago, and there are many reasons why we consider it both a pleasure and a duty to point out some ...

    Swedish
    II D 7, II D 10, II D 8, II D 3, II E 2, IV