The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 17, 1883
    A Swedish Home for Emigrants in Chicago.

    AN EDITORIAL: The Swedish Tribune suggested today that the Swedish community in Chicago, which now numbers around 30,000,should build a home for Swedish immigrants. The German immigrants recently celebrated the Two hundredth anniversay of the German Pilgrims' arrival at Germantown, Pennsylvania. On this occasion the Germans in the United States decided to build a home in Chicago for German immigrants at a cost of $50,000. The editor of The Swedish Tribune, therefore, thought it would be wise for the Swedes to make preparations to erect such a home for their own immigrants.

    Such a building should contain hotel rooms, reading rooms and halls in which the various societies can hold their meetings, concerts, and leatures.

    AN EDITORIAL: The Swedish Tribune suggested today that the Swedish community in Chicago, which now numbers around 30,000,should build a home for Swedish immigrants. The German immigrants recently celebrated the ...

    Swedish
    III G, II D 6
  • Chicago Tribune -- March 22, 1890
    [Discuss Boarding Home for Working-Women]

    There was a meeting at the Tremont House yesterday afternoon at which an association was formed to maintain a Scandinavian boarding home for working-women.

    The following directors were elected: Dr. Odelia Blenn, Dr. Fanny Dickenson, Dr. Lucy Waite, Mrs. Anna Armstrong, A. E. Johnson, Alex Johnson, proprieter of the Skaffaren; A. Chaiser of the Swenska Tribune; Peter Swanson, Swedish Vice-Consul; Emil Dryer, Danish Consul; Canute R. Matson, Coroner Hertz, Helge A. Haugan, John A. Anderson of the Scandinaven; the Rev. Christian Freider of the Christian Advocate, and the Rev. A. Hallner of the Mission Friend.

    There was a meeting at the Tremont House yesterday afternoon at which an association was formed to maintain a Scandinavian boarding home for working-women. The following directors were elected: Dr. ...

    Swedish
    II D 6
  • Svenska Tribunen -- September 17, 1891
    Plans for a Swedish Lodge Building.

    Numerous plans have been afoot toward the realization of the long-nourished idea of the bringing about the building of a large lodge or assembly building for the Swedish people of Chicago. Most of these plans have died in their infancy. This time, however, the prospects are more concrete than ever before. A month or so ago the Svea Society organized a committee for the purpose of stimulating interest for the idea among all the other Swedish ledges and societies in Chicago. The plan was to encourage and assist in the organizing of a similar committee within each individual ledge or society. The plan has met with success, for four Swedish societies have already joined with Svea in this endeavor, namely: Independent Order of Svithied, the Viking Society, Society Thor, and the Scandinavian Brick Mason's Association. All of these organizations have large memberships and are very progressive, all of which tends to speak for the success of the idea. Finally, we are prompted to add that a joint meeting of the five societies mentioned has been set for October 4, at which time several ether organizations are expected to join the movement.

    Numerous plans have been afoot toward the realization of the long-nourished idea of the bringing about the building of a large lodge or assembly building for the Swedish people of ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, III B 2, III A, II D 1
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 21, 1892
    More about the Swedish Society Building

    The central committee for the Swedish Society Building project met last Sunday, to replace Mr. Wahlgren, who has asked to be relieved from his duties as chairman. O Wessman was unanimously elected to the chairmanship of the committee. In addition Dr. Sven Windrow was elected secretary and Andrew Chytraeus, treasurer.

    Each and every one of the ten representatives from the individual lodges and societies taking active part at this point, was given five lists for the solicitation of subscriptions on shares. Lists were also taken by each one of the committee members. A minimum of $5,000. was set for collection by each stock seller. To stimulate the interest for increased activity among the solicitors, two of the committee members, Chaiser and Chytraeus, jointly donated a prize of $50. to go to the most successful salesman of shares.

    The central committee for the Swedish Society Building project met last Sunday, to replace Mr. Wahlgren, who has asked to be relieved from his duties as chairman. O Wessman was ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, III B 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 07, 1904
    A Scandinavian "People's House" in Chicago (Editorial)

    From time to time the question has come up why we Chicago Swedes do not procure our own building, a Swedish "People's House," such as they have in many cities in Sweden, which would serve as a central meeting place for the discussion of our own affairs. The money which we now spend for rent of halls could then be diverted to other purposes, and such a building would, of course, tie closer together the various Swedish societies in Chicago.

    These were the points stressed in the invitation issued by the Verdande Lodge for a massmeeting last Sunday in Jaeger's Hall, but, we are sorry to report, the public did not respond in such numbers as one would expect for this occasion, so important to Swedish interests.

    2

    However, the meeting took place, and a number of worthy proposals were discussed. A Swedish Finlander and a newspaper man brought up the idea of a Scandinavian "People's House," and pointed out the many advantages of such a project, one of them being the great energy and enthusiasm displayed by our Scandinavian neighbors--the Norwegians, Danes, and Finlanders--for undertakings of this kind.

    Many speakers supported the proposition, and a ten-man committee was appointed and instructed to get in touch with the Scandinavian organizations, particularly on the North Side, requesting them to send delegates to another meeting, to be held in the near future, and where the question of a Scandinavian "People's House" will be discussed from all angles.

    The committee was instructed to study and make suggestions in regard to the 3financing of the project, location, building plans, and other details.

    When this preliminary survey is completed, a meeting is to be called of all the Scandinavian delegates. The latter should be authorized to speak for their respective organizations, so that definite decisions may be made. New proposals are, of course, gratefully received.

    Nearly everybody present at the meeting seemed to be inspired by the idea; only a few expressed their doubt as to the desirability and practicability of such an undertaking by Chicago's Scandinavians, and they did not succeed in discouraging the rest.

    For many decades now the Scandinavians have kept on coming to this great Western Hemisphere, tempted by enticing stories of dollars and gold, and more "milk and honey" than can be found in the countries of the north. When 4the young Swede, the young Finn, the young Dane, and the young Norwegian set their feet on American soil they usually lose track of the friends and acquaintances which they have acquired during the voyage across the ocean; they scatter to the north, south, east, and west, and our immigrant finds himself alone. In some cases he has relatives and friends to go to, but most newcomers are complete strangers. The Scandinavian immigrant then looks for an organization of his countrymen, where he may find sympathy and strike up new friendships. This is not always so easy, unacquainted as he is with the city and the language. In a centrally located Scandinavian "People's House" he has a good opportunity to attend the meetings of various types of organizations and to join those that appeal to him. A home of this kind here in Chicago would undoubtedly give the impulse for the establishment of similar institutions in other cities with a considerable Scandinavian population.

    In the same manner that the individual feels the need of associating with others of his kind, and just as this association is beneficial if properly 5chosen, so it would be a great boon to Scandinavian brotherhood and cooperation if this plan could become a reality, including at least the societies of the North and Northwest Side of the city; the South siders are probably too far removed from the center of the Scandinavian population to take advantage of this opportunity.

    This is indeed a great cause, worthy of the most wise and energetic leadership that can be obtained.

    It is not out of order already at this point to begin to picture the interior of this future "People's House," the exterior we will leave to the contractors and architects. The layout must be carefully planned. There must be of course, a large auditorium, suitable for theatre and concert performances, with up-to-date stage facilities. Every effort should be made to make this auditorium spacious, dignified, and beautiful. This is desirable not only from the 6esthetic but also from the financial point of view, with an eye to profitable renting. It is particularly important that this auditorium be so planned that the greatest Swedish (also the greatest Scandinavian) organization in Chicago--The Swedish National League--will find it suitable for its needs. We all know what immense sums the league pays out in rent alone for its annual events, for instance in the Auditorium. In addition to this large room, several smaller ones, suitable for lodge and club meetings, should be provided for. There should also be a library and reading room, well stocked with selected literature and newspapers, as well as a lecture room and a gymnasium. A restaurant, smoking room, and a bowling alley should not be lacking.

    Up to now there has been little or no association and cooperation among the four Scandinavian brother nationalities in this city. The proposed "People's House" would be a strong instrument for unity, replacing dissention and jealousy with concord and friendliness.

    7

    You, Scandinavian individuals and organizations, do not treat this cause with arrogant contempt, and do not take it for granted that this plan cannot be materialized just because it did not originate with you or your organization; and do not shake your head at the name "People's House."

    At this stage of advanced civilization and progressive enlightenment, those that already enjoy the advantages of education, culture, and wealth, should not make it their business to resist the intellectual progress of the masses; it is rather their privilege, for instance, by means of such a "People's House," to contribute generously to the knowledge and education of their less privileged fellow human beings, through lectures, discussions, and the like.

    Take the constructive, progressive attitude and remember that "many small creeks make the big river."

    From time to time the question has come up why we Chicago Swedes do not procure our own building, a Swedish "People's House," such as they have in many cities ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, II B 2 a, III A, III G, I A 3, II D 6, II D 6
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 28, 1904
    To the Scandinavians of Chicago

    Never before have world conditions forced individuals to co-operation, drawn them together, as is the case now, in these days. The weak have to protect themselves against the abuses of the strong, and the lower, underprivileged classes are gradually becoming conscious of the fact that they are potentially many times as strong as the so-called upper classes. The tendency is toward socialism; the demand for municipal ownership, for instance, is a typical sign of the times, a step in the right direction. There are already indications that even the gigantic trusts may soon come under the complete control of the Government, and we will then have all the prerequisites of a paternal form of government, which controls everything and everybody. Switzerland, Australia and New Zealand have been in the lead along this road of progress. Therefore, brother Scandinavians, imbued with that same spirit, let us also get together and build a great Scandinavian People's House, here in Chicago, to serve as our social and political center.

    2

    Scandinavian unity is not a new idea. History teaches us, it must be admitted, that Scandinavianism, as practiced during the 126 years of the Kalmar Union, when the three countries were united under one king, was fraught with misunderstanding and strife. But this was due to the misrule of foreign kings and queens, and to the jealousies existing among the wealthy and greedy nobles. However, that was 400 years ago, and we have advanced in enlightenment and civilization, and particularly is this true here in the free West where we don't have even the remnants of Scandinavian class rule--but we do need each other.

    Such changes and improvements as take place in this world are as a rule very much needed and overdue, and such a community center, a Scandinavian People's House has been under discussion several times in the past. The idea has repeatedly shot across our horizon like a beam of light, and we take it as a good omen that it has now been revived by the Verdandi Lodge, Light Bearer, and again presented to Chicago's Scandinavian population.

    3

    Sceptics will declare that the Scandinavians, the Swedes, Norwegians and Danes, and for our present purpose we wish also to include our cousins, the Finlanders, cannot get along together. As part of our answer we will point out the fact that in recent years, during strikes and lockouts in anyone of the countries in question, the labor unions of the others have come to the aid, financially as well as morally, of the strikers, or those subjected to the lockout, and have helped them to hold out until an agreement was reached. Perfect co-operation exists among the labor unions of those countries and when union delegates have occasion to visit their brethren across the border, they always receive a hearty welcome. As far back as 1887, in London, England, a Swedish Workers' Club, two Norwegian and two Danish, united and formed a Scandinavian Workers' Society, which bought its own building and was active for many years with very beneficial results. There would be no difficulties among Scandinavian nationals were it not for a few mischief-makers.

    Our own capital, Washington, boasts a Scandinavian Society, the president 4of which is Mr. Sartz, former editor of the Norwegian publication Norden (The North), of Chicago. Both Paris and Rome have their Scandinavian organizations, their membership consisting mostly of students, writers and artists.

    We ought to be ashamed that with a Scandinavian population as large as that of Stockholm, we are not yet able to point to a Scandinavian People's House.

    The Chicago Federation of Labor has recently organized and incorporated a company for the purpose of erecting a Labor Temple at a cost of five hundred thousand dollars. The 150 Scandinavian organizations in our city should be able to finance a similar undertaking, and such a "federation" as we are here proposing would represent a power that would have to be reckoned with in the conduct of the city's affairs, and it would also promote Scandinavian unity in other parts of the United States.

    Such a Scandinavian People's House would become the center of the official 5social life of our people, and we tentatively suggest that it should be located as centrally as possible, and should contain modern facilities for theatrical performances and concerts, lecture rooms, lodge halls, class rooms for night schools and a library. In addition there should be a gymnasium, and a Swedish massage establishment, and also a restaurant; we would recommend that no alcoholic beverages be sold in the building. It would certainly be desirable to move the free Swedish labor bureau to such a location, and even to reorganize it into an All-Scandinavian agency.

    There are some 150,000 Swedes in Chicago, and of these, 40,000 do not belong to any church. Surely many of them would like to attend the scientific, historical and philosophical lectures in the projected People's House; the same goes for Norwegians, Danes and Finns.

    We sincerely hope that the great Swedish and Norwegian newspapers in Chicago will not permit themselves to be influenced by selfish interests, but will 6give the project their wholehearted support.

    We herewith request every Scandinavian lodge and society in Chicago to send delegates to the mass meeting which is to be held at Jaeger's Hall, Larrabee Street and Clybourn Avenue, July 17, at 8:00 P. M., for the purpose of discussing the plan; a working committee will then be appointed. Every organization should send at least one delegate and the larger ones, one for each hundred of their membership.

    Signed: A. Ahlberg

    K. J. Ellington

    K. G. Fredin

    M. J. Ring

    E. Johnson

    C. E. Kronlof

    A. Holm

    E. Ahlskog

    G. Berg

    J. G. Hamilton

    Never before have world conditions forced individuals to co-operation, drawn them together, as is the case now, in these days. The weak have to protect themselves against the abuses of ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, II B 2 d 1, I D 2 a 2, III B 2, V A 2, III H, I C, I E, V B, I C, I C
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- January 28, 1908
    Swedish-American National Festival

    A large Swedish-American national festival will be held Feb. 20 in Orchestra Hall, 169 Michigan Avenue. Among other features in the program there will be a mixed choir of 200 or 250 voices and a men's choir of 50 or 75 voices. Baritone Gustaf Holmquist and pianist Sigfried Laurin, of Rock Island, will offer patriotic numbers. Admission is 35, 50, and 75 cents; boxes six dollars, that is, one dollar a person. The proceeds will be divided equally between the Augustana Hospital's Free Hospitalization Fund and the Home for Young Women in Chicago.

    A friendly invitation is extended to all our people wishing to enjoy an evening of entertainment and at the same time to help a good cause.

    A large Swedish-American national festival will be held Feb. 20 in Orchestra Hall, 169 Michigan Avenue. Among other features in the program there will be a mixed choir of 200 ...

    Swedish
    II D 3, II B 1 c 3, III B 3 a, II D 6
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- March 02, 1921
    The Mission Society

    The Chicago Lutheran Home Mission Society held its annual membership meeting last Wednesday, February 23, at the Central Home, 1346 North La Salle Street.

    The report submitted by the president of the Society, Pastor J. Jesperson, was very encouraging, as was the financial report which was read by the treasurer, Louis M. Nelson. During 1920 the gross income amounted to $33,241.40, and the value of buildings and other properties increased $10,000. The society's liabilities were reduced according to plans. Pastors C. O. Bengtson, Carl Christenson and Gottfred Olsson, and also the laymen Axel Ostrand, Chas. E. Hallberg, C. G. Brunell and Emanuel Munson were newly elected members of the board of directors.

    The board of directors was authorized to expend $50,000 on an addition to the Central Home. It has been evident for some time that there is a real need in Chicago for a larger Lutheran Home and hospice.

    2

    The past year was by far the most successful one in the history of the Society. At the end of the meeting, the president, on behalf of the organization, thanked all those who with their time, talent and money had contributed to its welfare and success.

    The Chicago Lutheran Home Mission Society held its annual membership meeting last Wednesday, February 23, at the Central Home, 1346 North La Salle Street. The report submitted by the president ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, III C
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- August 10, 1921
    The Lutheran Central Home Expands

    The Chicago Lutheran City Mission League has taken title to the property-located at 1342 North La Salle Street, which has been bought for the purpose of expanding the Central Home. The newly acquired property borders on that of the Home, and on it is a three-story building containing twenty-two rooms. This building will now be remodeled and modernized and made part of the Home.

    The price paid for the property was $18,000, which was considered reasonable.

    The Chicago Lutheran City Mission League has taken title to the property-located at 1342 North La Salle Street, which has been bought for the purpose of expanding the Central Home. ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, III C, II F
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- September 20, 1922
    A Building for Chicago's Swedes (Editorial)

    As reported on another page in this issue, plans are under way for the building of a central Swedish clubhouse in New York City, and it looks as if these plans will materialize in the near future. The total cost of the projected building is estimated at four hundred thousand dollars. It should not be too difficult to raise this sum, for when the building is completed it is certain to yield a considerable income in rent. The venture is a sound one from a business point of view.

    It is a laudable undertaking, and speaks well for our countrymen in the eastern metropolis.

    They are setting an example which might well be followed in other Swedish 2centers in America, particularly in Chicago. The need for such a Swedish building here has been evident for a long time. The old Svenska Tribunen took up the idea as far back as 1890, advocating "the erection of a building where we Swedes can gather on important occasions without having to impose on the hospitality of other nationalities, who have had sufficient foresight and initiative to secure suitable buildings of their own." Many years have passed since the Tribunen took up this cause. Great changes have taken place, and Chicago's Swedes have been forging ahead. There are now many fine Swedish clubhouses in various parts of the city, but what we still lack is a central Swedish building in the Loop, Chicago's business center.

    The need for such a building is becoming increasingly evident. Our standards are higher now than ever before, and the need now is for a club building after the pattern of, for example, the Hamilton Club, with first-class restaurant service, large and small dining rooms, committee rooms, a gymnasium, a swimming pool, baths, locker rooms, etc. There should also be a 3great auditorium, big enough to accommodate large crowds at mass meetings, conventions, music festivals, moving picture shows, dramatic performances, and banquets. The upper floors might offer hotel facilities for residents and out-of-town club members.

    Is not this an attractive idea, and would not such a Swedish building reflect credit on every Swede in the city? The answer is yes; and some such plan as outlined here therefore merits serious consideration. There are many financially responsible Swedes in city, and it should be easy to interest them in such a project. If, in addition, our numerous societies and clubs should lend their co-operation, there is no good reason why plans and talk should not be transformed into action in the immediate future.

    As reported on another page in this issue, plans are under way for the building of a central Swedish clubhouse in New York City, and it looks as if these ...

    Swedish
    II D 6