The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- July 06, 1880
    Unveiling of Monument for "Herman Roos"

    On January 2, 1880 Herman Roos, editor of the Swedish-American, a representative man in Scandinavian circles, and prominently known as an advocate of the doctrines of Voltaire and Thomas Paine, was accidentally run over by a train on the Michigan Southern Railroad and very seriously injured.

    Every effort was made to save his life, but death ensued shortly afterward. Mr. Roos was a man of finished education, a graduate of Copenhagen University, a terse and forcible writer, and his influence among the Scandinavian free-thinkers of America was wide-spread and generally acknowledged. Since his untimely death his friends have been engaged in raising funds to erect a monument over his grave in Waldheim Cemetery.

    The work was completed some weeks ago, and yesterday a large concourse of Scandinavian citizens formally unveiled the monument.

    2

    The many friends of the dead journalist and writer proceeded by train to Oak Park, and thence to the cemetery by carriages. The arrangements for the impressive ceremony were in charge of Messrs. Magnus Elmblad, F. T. Engstrom, Charles Eklund, Nels Anderson, A. Lindquist, and C. F. Nelson.

    The "Svea Society" of which the deceased was an honored member, were present, carrying their beautiful society flags.

    Arriving at the grave, Capt. O. G. Lange read from manuscript a tribute to the lamented dead, during which the veil was taken from the column, displaying a Scotch granite monument twelve feet high resting upon a pedestal four feet in height.

    The monument is very plain, no attempt having been made at ornamentation.

    The following is inscribed upon the base in the Swedish language:

    3

    "Sacred to the Memory of Moons. Herman Roos of Hjelmsater, Sweden, who, as Editor of the Swedish-American, Fought Nobly for the Mastery of Common Sense and Reason, over Bigotry, Superstition, and Hypocrisy. In Honor of These Pinciples, Liberal-Minded Countrymen and Friends Throughout the United States Raised This Monument".

    Besides Capt. Lange, ex-Consul Sundell and Mr. Marcus Thrane also addressed the people in Swedish. The music for the occasion was supplied by Nitsche's band, and the Svea Singing Society sang several selections over the grave.

    Among the prominent Scandinavian citizens present were the Hon. C.G.Linderburg, P.M.Almini, A.G.Lundburg, M. Salmonsen, Dr. Paoli, Mr. E. Hegstrom, Marcus Thrane, L. P. Nelson, K. Nelson, and others.

    After completing the ceremonies, the friends returned by train to the city.

    On January 2, 1880 Herman Roos, editor of the Swedish-American, a representative man in Scandinavian circles, and prominently known as an advocate of the doctrines of Voltaire and Thomas Paine, ...

    Swedish
    IV, II C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 13, 1887
    A Statue of Karl von Linne

    A mass meeting was held on June 7th at Svea Hall to sondier a proposal to erect a statue in honor of Karl von Linne in Lincoln Park. The proposal was accepted with great enthusiasm, and the persons present appointed a committee of forty-five to handle the affair. The monument is going to be raised in the name of the Swedish-Americans in the United States and with their financial support.

    The committee elected the following as officers: President, John A. Enander, vice presidents: C.J.Sundell, Rob.Lindblom, P.M.Almin; P.S. Peterson, O.G.Lange, P.W.Nilson and A. Chaiser. Secretaries: L.Hasselroth, V.Tengwald, H.W.Brusewitz and C.Eklund, Treasurer, J.R.Lindgren, Fin. Sec. L.Widestrand.

    The General Committee made this appeal in The Swedish Tribune today:

    2

    "It has been suggested that the intended monument should be a copy of the one erected in Stockholm, Sweden a couple of years ago. About $40,000 is needed for the purpose. We, therefore, ask you, our countrymen, to co-operate with us.

    Linne' was a Swede of world-wide fame as a scientist. We Swedes in America should, therefore, honor him by erecting his statue in a place where men can seek rest after a busy day or week. Linne' gave to the world his beautiful truths of the life of the flowers. We, therefore, ask you for your contribution to enable us to erect this monument in Lincoln Park in Chicago. If 40,000 Swedish-Americans gave $1.00 each we would have the needed money in a couple of months.

    If someone should ask why the statue should be erected in Chicago we answer 3this: The largest Swedish colony is located in Chicago. Chicago is the most centrally located of all the large cities in the United States, and is the binding link between East and West, South and North,Chicago is the most cosmopolitan city in America. It is, therefore, most fitting that the statue should be raised here. The genius of Linne' was of such magnitude that he belongs to the whole world. ...

    A mass meeting was held on June 7th at Svea Hall to sondier a proposal to erect a statue in honor of Karl von Linne in Lincoln Park. The proposal ...

    Swedish
    II C, III A
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 04, 1888
    The Linne' Monument Society.

    The interest in contributing to the fund for the erection of a statue to Linne' is steadily increasing. Many different societies in the middle west are working hard and with great enthusiasm for this purpose.

    Many societies are arranging lectures, concerts, balls, and bazaars and are taking in hundreds of dollars in admission fees.

    A meeting was held last Tuesday night with the committee of the Linne' Society. The chairman reported that he had held a conference with the Commissioners of Lincoln Park the other day concerning a place for the statue. It was decided that the greenhouse should be demolished and its place be given to the new monument among the flowers. A letter from sculptor Dyverman, Stockholm, Sweden, was read at the meeting. Dyverman offered to deliver to the committee models of the statue for 9,000 Swedish kronen, and the foundry factory, Meijer & Co., Stockholm offered to cast the whole monument in copper for 250,000 and in zinc for 10,000 Swedish kronen.

    After the letter was read the chairman said he did not think it necessary to raise the suggested 40,000 then. He thought that $28,000 should be enough. Several speakers said that no conclusion should be reached until there was at least $10,000 in the treasury of the fund.

    The interest in contributing to the fund for the erection of a statue to Linne' is steadily increasing. Many different societies in the middle west are working hard and with ...

    Swedish
    II C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 03, 1890
    The Linne Memorial

    The Scandinavians know how to give their festivities a certain historical significance by including living pictures and even dramatic presentations of important events. They are masters in this respect. During the first half of the season, the state of the North Side Turnhall often functioned as a pictorial show place, where Gustav Adolphos' deeds of valor and the prowess of Nordic heroes were depicted. The local Swedes arranged a similar festival at the Armory of the Second Regiment, last Wednesday, which helped considerably in producing more funds for the Linne Memorial. This historic Wednesday marks an important botanical achievement which was realized 160 years ago. Linne at the time had just completed his now famous system of plant classification, the family and specie enumerating method. This occurence was the incentive for the celebration. Four Swedish Knights, armed with lances and garbed in 16th century costume, paraded as guards before the entrance to the hall. On the highly decorated stage, scenes from the Fridjof saga(and others) by the famous Swedish author, E. Tegner, were presented, followed by rustic dances in national costume. Linne's compatriots intend to erect a monument in Lincoln Park to perpetuate his memory. It is said that considerable sums have been contributed for this purpose

    The Scandinavians know how to give their festivities a certain historical significance by including living pictures and even dramatic presentations of important events. They are masters in this respect. During ...

    Swedish
    II C, II B 1 c 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 08, 1890
    The Linne Monument Society

    met last week to discuss several questions of major importance.

    It was reported that the freight charges for the transportation of the Linne statue from Sweden to Boston will amount to 25 pounds sterling, or approximately $150., and it was decided at the meeting to leave decision of the matter to the firm of Meyer & Company in Sweden. Another report was to the effect that the Grand Trunk Railway had promised to ship the monument via this railroad from Boston to Chicago free of charge. An offer from a sculptural artist in Stockholm to accompany the statue across to Chicago and to supervise the assembling and erection of the statue was declined, inasmuch as a competent person, at a considerably lower rate, can be found locally.

    Mr. Robert Lindblom renewed at this meeting his previously stated desire to be relieved of his duties as chairman of the Society and its executive committee, inasmuch as he is about to go to Europe and may be absent from Chicago for possibly a whole year. This gave cause to a lengthy discussion which resulted in an appeal to Mr. Lindblom to retain the presidency of the Society, especially in view of the fact that the burden of chairmanship in his absence could be placed upon the shoulders of the seven vice-presidents of the Society.

    2

    Mr. Lindblom thankfully acknowledged the "vote of confidence" accorded him, and consented to remain in his capacity.

    At this juncture mention was made of the fact that the by-laws of the Society provide that the presidential gavel, in the absence of the president, shall be in the hands of the vice-presidents in the order they are recorded. In view of the possibility of the regular president's lengthy absence, and particularly in view of the lack of interest displayed by the first vice-president, the meeting decided to suspend the rules and elect an executive president to serve during the absence of Mr. Lindblom. The roll call showed that the required majority was present, and Mr. Andrew Chaiser was duly elected to fill the position.

    The treasurer reported that a cash sum of $10,844.81 had been paid into the fund and was at this time at the Society's disposal. An additional sum of $4,000. has been pledged and will be in the treasury by August 1.

    met last week to discuss several questions of major importance. It was reported that the freight charges for the transportation of the Linne statue from Sweden to Boston will amount ...

    Swedish
    II C, III H, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 07, 1890
    For the Benefit of the Linne Monument Fund

    the various Swedish societies of Chicago will hold a joint mammoth picnic in Gardner's Park on Sunday, August 24. The most elaborate preparations are being made to make this picnic an outstanding event in the history of Swedish people of Chicago, to which end the following societies are uniting their best efforts: Svithiod; Nordstjernan; Iduna; Svea; Kronan; Vega; Engelbrekt; Balder; Gustav Adolf II; and the Swedish Glee Club.

    In this connection we will cite the report just made by the financial secretary of the Linne Memorial Fund Society. He states that a sum of not less than $1,376. has been made to the Society's treasury during the month of July and that the contributions up to and including July 31 totalled $12,463.81.

    the various Swedish societies of Chicago will hold a joint mammoth picnic in Gardner's Park on Sunday, August 24. The most elaborate preparations are being made to make this picnic ...

    Swedish
    II C, II B 1 c 3, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 03, 1891
    Scandia Hall

    The Scandia Hall, located on Ohio St., near Milwaukee Ave., has been built by the Scandinavian Labor Association and will be dedicated on Thursday, the twelfth day of March. It is a four story building, which cost $70,000. The ground area is 60x116 ft. A hall on the second floor has a capacity of 1,200 people; its dimensions are 60x70 ft., it is two stories high.

    A lovely stage and ornate curtains on which the three nationalities, Swedes, Norwegians and Danes have been depicted by portraits of famous men and other symbols, are a special ornament of the hall. The Scandinavian Labor Association has about one thousand members and its officers are the following: John Olsen, pres., N.M.Sonme, librarian, John Nelson, legal adviser.

    The Scandia Hall, located on Ohio St., near Milwaukee Ave., has been built by the Scandinavian Labor Association and will be dedicated on Thursday, the twelfth day of March. It ...

    Swedish
    II C, II C, II C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 02, 1891
    More about the Linne' Monument

    The Linne' Monument Society held its regular monthly meeting last week. The proposal of the "Committee of Nine" to issue 4,000 Linne' medals was approved of, the medals to sell at twenty-five cents apiece. The "Committee of Twelve" submitted a plan of celebrations in connection with the dedicatory ceremonies on May 23rd. To these plans we will refer more fully in a later issue, but may it be said that there will be a grand concert and a banquet to be held in the evening of the day of the dedication of the monument. The question of the four flanking, allegory figures, again gave cause to an animated discussion, but it is apparent that the problem is nearing solution.

    The Linne' Monument Society held its regular monthly meeting last week. The proposal of the "Committee of Nine" to issue 4,000 Linne' medals was approved of, the medals to sell ...

    Swedish
    II C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 23, 1891
    Linne's Monument.

    A grateful generation will give deserved tribute to the immortal Linne, father of botany, by dedicating his monument in Lincoln Park today. The festivities are to be held under the auspices of the Linnean Monument Association and several Swedish and Scandinavian clubs, which affilated themselves with the movement. The point of departure will be at 155 East Chicago Ave. at 2 P.M. From there the members march to Lincoln Park. Music and speeches are on the program. A continuation of the festivities will be given at Thielmann's Summer Garden, north of the park, where a wonderful concert, both instrumental and vocal,will bring the celebration to a fitting end.

    The speaker's list contains such well known names as Mr. Robert Lindblom, Dr.F. Larson, Mayor Washburne, etc.

    2

    The statue of Linne is thirty-nine feet high; its cost, including the allegorical figures which belong to the monument and to be added later, is $22,000. The figure in itself is fourteen and one-half feet tall. The location is at the continuation of Fullerton Ave., in Lincoln Park. The money has been donated mostly by the Swedes of Chicago. The monument is a copy of the Linne memorial of Stockholm, which was dedicated several years ago. The figure comes from the atelier of Otto Meyer & Co., the model, however, is the work of C.J.Defoeman. The granite work for the pedestal is the product of contractor Anderson of Prose Hill. .....

    The officials who founded the Linne' Association are: Robert Lindbloom, Pres., and eleven others, almost all of whom are Swedish.

    The arrangements which have been made for today, will undoubtedly induce thousands to go to Lincoln Park. All honor to the Swedes, who intend to perpetuate the memory of their famous countryman. It is a duty for the German to participate in the festival which has been given in honor of the renowned scientist.

    A grateful generation will give deserved tribute to the immortal Linne, father of botany, by dedicating his monument in Lincoln Park today. The festivities are to be held under the ...

    Swedish
    II C
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 24, 1891
    Presented to the City Unveiling of the Linne Statue at Lincoln Park

    With the sun shing from a cloudless sky on the trees and flowers which were his life study and surrounded by thousands of admiring fellow countrymen, the statue of Carl Von Linne in Lincoln Park was unveiled yesterday and formally became the property of the people of Chicago. The Swedish-American population of the city joined with visitors of that race from the Northwest in honoring the memory of Sweden's illustrious botanist, doctor, chemist, and zoologist.

    All the Swedish societies of Chicago, supplemented by labor organizations, several brass bands and prominent Swedish-American citizens in carriages rendesvoused at 155 East Chicago Avenue shortly after two o'clock. Marshaled by D. R. Sven Windrow, who wore the uniform of a select Knight of America, the procession passed between crowds of spectators via Dearborn Avenue to the park in the following order: Platoon of Police, Marshalls and Adjutant, Guard of Honor, Select Knights of America, Invited guests in carriages, directors of Swedish Linnean Association of Chicago, Society Svea 2Odd Fellows, First Swedish Lodge, Society of the North Star, headed by Swedish Gymnasium Society; Court Vega, Independent Order of Foresters, Independent Order of Svithiod, Scandinavian Society Kronan, Society Bolder, Society Thor, Courts Linne Stockholm and Tegner A. O. Foresters of America, Society Gustavos Adolphus, Society Dunee, Society Baltic, Harmony Knights of Pythias, Vikings, Alpha Literary Club, Society Linne, Independent Order of Good Templars, and Workingmen's Societies.

    A Brilliant Spectacle

    The procession was a brilliant spectacle. Most of the societies were uniformed and their gorgeous silk banners, mingling with the Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, and American national flags, added luster to the scene. As the procession turned into the Stockton Drive and advanced toward the statue, the thousands of citizens, women and children, who crowded around the platform and monument turned an admiring eye upon the approaching host and cheered lustily. From the platform as far as the eye could reach almost on all sides were to be seen people of all classes, equally divided as to sex, the typical Swedish features naturally predominating.

    3

    After a patriotic selection by the band on the platform, Robert Lindholm, president of the Linnean Association, removed his hat, advanced to the front of the platform and delivered the presentation speech which was frequently interrupted by applause. He said:

    The Presentation

    "In the name of the Swedish Linnean Monument Association, I have the honor and pleasure of presenting to the Commissioners of Lincoln Park and to the City of Chicago, a statue of Carl Von Linne, the naturalist, the doctor, the chemist, and the founder of scientific botany.

    "When we concluded to testify our regard for our adopted country and our favorite city in a proper and enduring manner, it did not take long for us to decide upon Linne as the best representative of that scientific foundation upon which rests the constitution, the government, and the wonderful development of the industrial resources of the great Republic of North America. Not that our native land is poor in great men, for no country has a greater percentage. Thrones have tottered at the beck, and empires have been disposed of by Swedish statesmen. Oppressed Europe has appealed to Swedish 4arms for deliverance, and have in vain.....

    Linne was in science what the old American pioneers were in industry. He embarked upon unknown seas. He left old landmarks behind him and made his own roads through the labyrinths of natural science, and he staked out these roads so plainly that his followers could not lose their way. He divided the vegetable kingdom into twenty-four classes and the animal kingdom into six classes. These classes he divided into orders; the orders he subdivided into genera and these again into species, and by so doing brought order out of chaos, and made it possible for his investigators to pursue their investigations intelligently. He never claimed that his classification (based on outward semblances) was a scientific basis and he hinted at the changes that were subsequently advocated by Curie, who made anatomy the basis for clarification, but Linne knew that no one man could hope to accomplish in his life a purely scientific classification, and he made the easiest road he could, knowing that some road was necessary before any progress could be made, and science today is traveling on his roads.

    The idea of different sex in plants, dreamed of by Aristotle 2,000 years before was first promulgated by Linne and made use of in his classification. He published scientific works mostly in Latin, commenced with his system of 5nature, embraced nearly every branch of natural science as well as medicine, and there are twenty-eight in number.

    As Mr. Lindholm uttered the last word his eleven year old daughter Vesta, attired in a Swedish peasant dress and garlanded with carnations and smilax, pulled the cord attached to the top of the statue. After a few seconds of suspense the flags of Norway, Sweden, and the United States, parting and falling to the base of the monument revealed to the view of the great throng the bronze feature of Carl Von Linne.

    With the sun shing from a cloudless sky on the trees and flowers which were his life study and surrounded by thousands of admiring fellow countrymen, the statue of Carl ...

    Swedish
    II C