The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 08, 1902
    [Swedes Give Benefit Festival]

    Verdandi Lodge No. 3, I. O. S. held its annual New Year's feast at Spelz Hall last Saturday night. Stereoptican views were shown. Music and songs were also on the program, which ended with a ball. Refreshments were served.

    The Swedish Home for Aged will receive a certain per cent of the net income from the feast.

    Verdandi Lodge No. 3, I. O. S. held its annual New Year's feast at Spelz Hall last Saturday night. Stereoptican views were shown. Music and songs were also on the ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 2 e, II D 10
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- December 16, 1909
    Lecture Tour

    Miss Hedvig, of the Peterson Commission, who has been on the editorial staff of the Stockholm Blade for several years, is here to study American life and accomplishments. She carries recommendations from Archbishop Ekman, General Director Sigfrid Wieselgren, and the writer, Selma Lagerlof. She will be in Chicago during the later part of January, and will give lectures on the subjects: "Swedish-Americans in Sweden," and "Stockholm Now and Before." The lectures will be accompanied by lantern slides.

    Miss Hedvig, of the Peterson Commission, who has been on the editorial staff of the Stockholm Blade for several years, is here to study American life and accomplishments. She carries ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II B 2 e
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1914
    A Christmas Feast

    On last Sunday at Orchestra Hall, a very attractive program was presented.

    Professor Emil Larson played several Swedish folk melodies on the organ. The Swedish Glee Club, directed by Professor Dahlen, sang several numbers and so did Knut Sjoberg, a baritone. "King Oscar's farewell to Sweden" was recited by director Behmer. A moving picture, with sceneries from Sweden and Chicago concluded the program.

    On last Sunday at Orchestra Hall, a very attractive program was presented. Professor Emil Larson played several Swedish folk melodies on the organ. The Swedish Glee Club, directed by Professor ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 a, II B 2 e
  • Svenska Kuriren -- May 14, 1914
    Swedish Patriotic Feast

    A Swedish patriotic feast has been arranged at Orchestra Hall Saturday, May 30, at 8 P.M. by the Swedish National Society and National Chorus, They will be assisted by the Royal Court Singer, Signe Rappe, from the Royal Swedish Opera, Stockholm; Alb. Lindquist, opera tenor, of the Chicago University Symphony Orchestra. Mrs. Carl Chindblom will be at the piano.

    Editor A. O. Assar from Stockholm will present moving pictures, showing the Farmer's Expedition and the Swedish students waiting upon King Gustav at the Stockholm Castle.

    A Swedish patriotic feast has been arranged at Orchestra Hall Saturday, May 30, at 8 P.M. by the Swedish National Society and National Chorus, They will be assisted by the ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 2 e
  • Svenska Kuriren -- June 04, 1914
    The Swedish Patriotic Feast

    The patriotic feast, arranged by the Swedish National Society and the National Chorus at Orchestra Hall last Saturday night was well attended, but not to any overflow.

    The interesting program began with two numbers, played by the Chicago University Amateur Orchestra, and directed by J. Beach Cragun. After a brief talk by Charles J. Ericson, president of the Society. Joel Mossberg directed the chorus, which sang several Swedish folksongs during the evening. Following this came the Royal Swedish Court singer, Signe Rappe, from the Royal Swedish Opera in Stockholm. She appeared on the stage with her husband, Herbert Lunden-Welden, who accompanied her on the piano. Her excellent song was rewarded with lively applauses and a gigantic bouquet of red roses.

    Editor A. O. Assar of Stockholm presented a moving picture at the end of the concert, showing interesting places from Sweden.

    The patriotic feast, arranged by the Swedish National Society and the National Chorus at Orchestra Hall last Saturday night was well attended, but not to any overflow. The interesting program ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 1 a, II B 2 e
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 04, 1917
    [Swedish Film Shown]

    p.11................The Swedish Red Cross received a considerable sum from the Swedish Film which a few weeks ago were so fully exhibited at Orchestra Hall and Strand Theatre.

    Its Director, Charles S. Peterson, whose guarantee of subsidy for these "Film Forestallningor" (filmings), brought about this showing.

    Director Peterson has sent to Sweden the sum of $486.47, which sum is to be equally divided between the Red Cross and Crown Princess' War Fund.

    p.11................The Swedish Red Cross received a considerable sum from the Swedish Film which a few weeks ago were so fully exhibited at Orchestra Hall and Strand Theatre. Its Director, Charles ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 e, II D 10, I G
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 23, 1919
    J. P. Seeburg Organs

    The art of organ building-as old as it is-has gone forward in double-quick pace during the last ten years. The introduction of electric power has opened unexpected possibilities in the domain of organ technique. We read that a few days ago, the world's largest all electric transmission organ has been installed in the Palace Church in the capital city of Sweden. And we were especially exultant to read that the inventor of this organ was Swedish Director J. Johansson, of Akerman and Lund's new organ factory at home. The organ is revolutionary, we decided we should give this joyous information to one of our most outstanding specialists in this country, Mr. J. P. Seeburg, chief of the J. P. Seeburg Piano Company, and head of Seeburg and Smith's magnificent organ building company in Chicago.

    After a talk with him, our admiration for the Swedish invention fell considerably.

    2

    We are told that Director Johansson's invention is by no means new. Seeburg and Smith has manufactured similar organs for a number of years. The company has made great progress in this field.

    The first Swedish church in this country to install an organ similar to the one in the Palace Church of Stockholm, was the Ebenezer Church, at Foster Avenue and Paulina Street in Chicago. Since then, many other churches have purchased electric transmission organs.

    The new principle in these electrical organs is called "The Unified System." This invention is undeniably great and revolutionary. But the honor does not go to Sweden, but to England. The rights to the invention were obtained a number of years ago by Mr. Seeburg and his firm. The company has since 3greatly developed the invention. Seeburg and Smith now manufacture electrical transmission organs which set forth complete orchestral effects. The organist at the keyboard is "the leader of the band." Hundreds of organs of this kind are sold yearly to first class theatres in this country,and in South America, and other countries.

    The concert organ in the Ebenezer Church cost $12,000, but the price of an orchestral organ starts at $15,000, and ranges upward to $100,000, and more, depending on the number of instruments one wishes the organ to "manage." We visited the company's display hall, 1004 Republic Building, and heard an organ demonstrated, which, besides being an ordinary concert organ, was also an orchestral organ, reproducing intonations of such instruments as violin, clarinet, 4flute, harp, violincello, piano, cornet, chimes, etc. This instrument is a true miracle of inventive ability. Seated at the keyboard, the player may bring forth the tones of a violin or cello solo, with piano or harp accompaniment, or other arrangements.

    Mr. Seeburg is now manufacturing a self-playing orchestral organ. This is built on about the same principle as the orchestral organ mentioned. It uses paper rolls like the ordinary player-piano. It is operated by electrical power. These self-playing orchestral organs, primarily designed for movie houses, reproduce the music without the mechanical and annoying bi-sounds, which appear in the music of the ordinary player-piano. This and the other inventions are the work of Mr. Seeburg and his assistants, and thus, can be said to be Swedish-American. For it should, of course, be known to the 5majority that Mr. Seeburg is Swedish. He was born in 1871, in Gothenburg, and came here at the age of fifteen with "two empty hands," as the old saying goes. At the present time his enterprise is the leader in its field. The firm's main office, factories, and display halls are located in Chicago, but a branch office has been maintained in New York for a number of years, and there are branches in other cities throughout the country.

    The art of organ building-as old as it is-has gone forward in double-quick pace during the last ten years. The introduction of electric power has opened unexpected possibilities in the ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, II A 3 b, II B 2 e, I D 1 a, III H, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- February 23, 1921
    The Swedish Film

    The great Swedish film presentation had its premiere in Orchestra Hall last night, and all seats were sold out in advance. But do not get discouraged! There will be plenty of opportunities to see this beautiful film showing ten thousand feet of moving pictures of Swedish cities, towns and countryside. The owners have rented the Aryan Grotto Temple, at Wabash Avenue and 8th Street, for eight more presentations,which will take place from February 27 to March 6, inclusive. The program will be identical with that offered at the premiere. The Northland Trio has been engaged for all eight showings of the film, as has the orchestra directed by Professor C. Sinn.

    The entire program is even more interesting and entertaining than is indicated by comments in the press. The film is so detailed and comprehensive that practically every Swedish-American has an opportunity to view the 2city, town or country district where he was born and played as a child. One might say that those who have seen Sweden only in their thoughts during the last decades have got a chance here to visit the old country without moving from their seats in the theatre. They will see the homecoming, when the liner "Stockholm" docks in Gothenburg, as well as the departure, when the "Drotningholm" leaves the Swedish coast behind, bound for New York. As one travels through the country with this film as a guide, he will see more of the country than he would be likely to see during an actual visit. He makes the thrilling trip through the locks of the Trollhattan Canal, and views the sunrise at Karlstad. The next minute he attends the world ski meet at Holmenkollen, Norway, where the world's most daring jumpers and long distance skiers vie for honors. He visits a large number of cities and towns, and makes extensive trips through the farm country. Of course, he makes a lengthy visit to the capital, Stockholm.

    This and much more is to be seen at the Aryan Grotto Temple during the showing of this film, and it should be enough to draw a capacity house every night.

    The great Swedish film presentation had its premiere in Orchestra Hall last night, and all seats were sold out in advance. But do not get discouraged! There will be plenty ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 e, II A 3 b, III H
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- October 04, 1922
    Swedish Motion Picture

    The Swedish motion picture "The Vermlanders," was presented twice last Thursday at the Lincoln Dixie Theater in Chicago Heights. The performances, which were arranged by various Swedish organizations in the locality, attracted capacity crowds, and are counted among the most successful events ever staged in that theater.

    The enthusiasm with which the picture was received augurs well for its success in other towns and cities throughout the state. The next performance will be given in the high school auditorium in Batavia.

    The Swedish motion picture "The Vermlanders," was presented twice last Thursday at the Lincoln Dixie Theater in Chicago Heights. The performances, which were arranged by various Swedish organizations in the ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 e
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- October 04, 1922
    Swedish Motion Picture

    The Swedish motion picture, "The Vermlanders," was presented twice last Thursday at the Lincoln Dixie Theater in Chicago Heights. The performances, which were arranged by various Swedish organizations in the locality, attracted capacity crowds, and are counted among the most successful events ever staged in that theater.

    The enthusiasm with which the picture was received augurs well for its success in other towns and cities throughout the state. The next performance will be given in the high school auditorium in Batavia.

    The Swedish motion picture, "The Vermlanders," was presented twice last Thursday at the Lincoln Dixie Theater in Chicago Heights. The performances, which were arranged by various Swedish organizations in the ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 e