The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 28, 1891
    Scandinavian Civil Engineers Organize

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago was organized last Thursday, the 21, at a meeting held in the Sherman House. The following officers were elected: Allan Strale, president; L. Holmboe, first vice-president; E.T. Sederholm, second vice-president; Thomas G. Pihlfedit, secretary; and Chr. Holth, treasurer. By-laws were drafted and adopted.

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago was organized last Thursday, the 21, at a meeting held in the Sherman House. The following officers were elected: Allan Strale, president; L. Holmboe, ...

    Swedish
    II A 1, II B 2 c
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 22, 1892
    Among Our Engineers

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago held its regular monthly meeting last Thursday, at the Sherman House, under the presidency of Allan Strale. A discussion on "The Relative Features of Rope and Belt Transmissions" was opened by the society's first vice president, E. T. Sederholm, who holds the position of chief engineer of the Fraser & Chalmer's Engine Works. A discussion of the same subject will be resumed at the society's next monthly meeting, at which time a written treatise on the subject, will be read by N. A. Christensen, who is a consulting engineer with the above mentioned firm. Non-members are invited to take part in these instructive discussions.

    The Scandinavian Engineering Society of Chicago held its regular monthly meeting last Thursday, at the Sherman House, under the presidency of Allan Strale. A discussion on "The Relative Features of ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II B 2 c, II A 1
  • Svenska Nyheter -- August 01, 1905
    Swedish-American Historical Society

    The Swedish-American Historical Society, planned during the last few months, was organized last Saturday at a meeting held in the building of Chicago Historical Society. Statutes were adopted and officers elected.

    The Swedish-American Historical Society, planned during the last few months, was organized last Saturday at a meeting held in the building of Chicago Historical Society. Statutes were adopted and officers ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c
  • Svenska Nyheter -- September 05, 1905
    Swedish-Amerigan Historical Society

    The Swedish-American Historical Society was organized last week at a meeting held in John Crerer Library building. The following officers were elected: president, Dr. John A. Enander; vice-president, Dr. Gustaf Andreen, also president of Augustana College, Rock Island; secretary and editor, Mr. A. Schon; treasurer, A. G. S. Josephson, Chicago.

    The Swedish-American Historical Society was organized last week at a meeting held in John Crerer Library building. The following officers were elected: president, Dr. John A. Enander; vice-president, Dr. Gustaf ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- January 28, 1908
    Swedish American Historical Society

    The society has recently sent out its Year Book. It has sixty-four pages. It tells of the accomplishments for 1906, as well as what part the Swedish people have played in the national life in America since the Swedish landed in Delaware in 1600 up till the present time. The Year Book has a biography of John Morton, one of the Swedish American Revolutionists - one of the patriots who undertook self preservation at that time.

    The Swedish American Historical Society has undertaken a splendid work; namely, the preservation of all information pertaining to Swedish American culture, and anything else that might be of historical interest in regard to the Swedish people's presence in the United States. The society's work is, therefore, worth encouragement. These interested in the work may communicate with the secretary, A. G. S. Josephson, care of John Crerar Library, 87 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Illinois.

    The society has recently sent out its Year Book. It has sixty-four pages. It tells of the accomplishments for 1906, as well as what part the Swedish people have played ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c, II B 2 d 3
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- March 31, 1908
    Swedish American Historical Society

    The Society held their third annual meeting March 25, at the Chicago Historical Societies Building, 142 Dearborn Avenue. Mr. Franklin H. Head welcomed the Swedish people. Pastor C. G. Wallenius of Donovan, Illinois was detained so E. W. Olson was elected chairman for the evening. Pastor J. E. Hillberg read a message sent in by Pastor Wallenius, his subject was: The Swedish American Literature and its meaning for the Swedish American world.

    The secretary's report this year showed that during the year two of the society's desires have been realized. The first year book of the society has been printed. The library has moved to the Swedish Theological Semminary's new building in Evanston where a room has been obtained for its use. Several valuable gifts have been received during the past year. Actual memories from Stockholm Linne Publications and a large collection of Swedish American newspapers were given by Consul G. N. Swan of Sioux City, Iowa, another valued collection is on the way from Prof. C. W. Foss of Rock Island, Ill.

    2

    The society plans to buy of Dr. O. N. Nelson in Minneapolis his library and this is nearer realization as Consul A. E. Johnson of New York has subscribed $100.00 to a purchasing fund on the condition that at least nine other like donations be secured. The price asked for the library is $2,000. Consul Johnson has also donated $60.00 for the purchase of book shelves; other money collected for the library amounted to $50.

    The management decided during the year that English shall be the official language of the society due to the fact that Americans could be interested in the under-taking, particularly offsprings of the Swedish Americans and it might also be that other Historical Societies with which we now exchange literature, might take part in this undertaking. Articles presented in Swedish will be printed in the Year's book in that language.

    The auditors of the treasurer reported $38.83 in the society's general fund, $48.00 in the library fund, and the lifetime membership fund $50.

    3

    Hon. E. W. Olsen gave an interesting report of his visit to Madison, Wisconsin as delegate to the American Historical Association's annual meeting. Hon. E. Mannhardt, secretary of the German American Historical Society of Illinois read a very interesting report of their work so far, and of the historical movement in general in this country. Wefind that another society has existed since 1889 which is incorporated by the name of Swedish American Historical Society, so the management made a motion to change their name to Swedish Historical Society of America. Other changes were offered so as to make the work more effective.

    The following members will manage the affair of the society for the coming three years: G. N. Swan, Sioux City, Iowa; D. Nyvall McPherson, Kansas; newley elected were J. Lundahl, A. J. Carlson and J. G. Sheldon all of Chicago; and for two years in the place of C. G. Largergren who resigned, Pastor J. E. Hillberg of Evanston, who already had been appointed to fill the vacancy.

    The society made a motion to get C.H.S.Sprincharn in Malmo, Sweden to secure records of the first colonists historically speaking. Mrs. George B. Keen of Philadelphia was requested to secure chapters about New Sweden in Justin Winsor's, "Narative and Critical History of America."

    4

    The management had suggested that the society take initiative regarding the holding of a conference with the teachers in the Swedish American schools, this led to a short but lively debate. The motion was laid over until next year's annual meeting. Council G. N. Nelson suggested that the society try and assemble literature from different states that might come under the society's interest even try and secure titles of such books, through the large libraries.

    Consul C. A. Ekstrom of St. Louis had made the trip to Chicago especially for this meeting and told of his interest and desire to work with and for the society's welfare. Talks of the same nature were given by Hon. F. A. Larson and others. The society management will appoint the various committees and then adjourn.

    The Society held their third annual meeting March 25, at the Chicago Historical Societies Building, 142 Dearborn Avenue. Mr. Franklin H. Head welcomed the Swedish people. Pastor C. G. Wallenius ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c, IV
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- June 16, 1908
    Swedish Historical Society of America

    The Swedish Historical Society has recently acquired a large addition to its library from the Engberg-Holmberg Publishing Company in Chicago. They gave samples of all publications of which the firm owned more than one volume, amounting to more than four hundred volumes. Among the donated books, we find that many belonged to other publishers which the above mentioned publishing company had purchased from such companies as the Swedish Lutheran Publication Society, Julin & Hedenberg, Julin & Rylander, A. Hult, Wistrand & Thulin, J. T. Relling Company, Enander & Boman, and Sangen Publishing 2Company. The oldest printed book in this collection goes back about fifty years. A complete set of the firm's catalogues, old and new, were included in the donation. The library of the Swedish Historical Society consists of about one thousand volumes, the largest part of which is printed in America by Swedish publishers. The Augustana Book concern, and the Methodist Book concern have also donated from their collections. Even from Sweden, valuable gifts have been received from the Academy of Stockholm, and P. A. Nerstedt & Sons. From the Government's Archives in Stockholm, a large shipment is on the way.

    The library of Uppala University has promised to send what they can of their 3volumes where they have duplicates that might be of interest to us. The generous Swedish-Americans have also wonderfully supplied the library with books. Among them is a very valuable selection of Swedish-American newspapers donated by Consul G. N. Swan of Sioux City, Iowa, Prof. C. W. Foss, of Rock Island, and also from the Augustana College.

    The Swedish Historical Society has recently acquired a large addition to its library from the Engberg-Holmberg Publishing Company in Chicago. They gave samples of all publications of which the firm ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c, II B 2 a, III H
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- June 23, 1908
    Swedish Historical Society

    The management of the Swedish Historical Society met at the John Crerar Library June 18, and discussed several plans whereby they might interest more of their compatriots in their work and to expand it. Among these plans, a resolution was adopted that during the fall, Prof. Oscar Montelius, who will give a series of lectures in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania, be invited to come to Chicago and give one or more lectures under the auspices of the society here. Prof. Oscar Montelius is not only one of Sweden's most educated men, but also one of the most popular public speakers. At one of his lectures a few months ago at Skofde, he spoke on the subject "Vastergotland in Moses' Time" and drew a mass of people. Secretary J. G. Sheldon announced that one of the admirers of the society, Rector Carl Sprineborn of Malmo, author of "Colonial New Sweden's History," has donated to the library of the society his 2own volume, which deals with writings from the library of Stockholm, and treats of the early colonial settlements. In these volumes, we even find photographs of the colonial period and writings relative to the purchase of Peminacka and Ahopameck Sackimonen from the Indian chiefs on July 8, 1654, and the valued charts with their markings which the Indians have copied somewhat.

    It was also reported by Hon. A. G. S. Johnson, chairman of the library committee, that the library at Evanston would be enlarged.

    The management of the Swedish Historical Society met at the John Crerar Library June 18, and discussed several plans whereby they might interest more of their compatriots in their work ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c, II B 2 a, II B 2 g
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- October 15, 1908
    Swedish Engineers Society Organized

    "Swedish Engineers Society" is the name given to a society organized last Saturday evening, the function of which will be to furnish an exchange of views between Swedish engineers of Chicago and other societies of engineers.

    G. A. Akerlind, consulting engineer of the National Pump Car Company and the Roger Ballast Car Company was the first to issue the call for a meeting at Kunz Remmler's. The meeting was attended by twenty ex-members of the Swedish Engineers club who have abandoned this organization because its work is unsatisfactory.

    After a discussion on important questions of organization, the following members were elected officers: Henry Nyberg, automobile manufacturer, chairman; Albin Rissler, engineer, vice-chairman; G. A. Akerlind, engineer, secretary; F. Seaberg, engineer, financial secretary and cashier. The members of the Executive Committee are Inspector C. A. Alzen; Henry Ericson, architect; A. G. Lund, Superintendent at the Illinois Steel Company; John Brunner; and Fred Norlin civil engineer. The meeting was followed by a dinner 2to which the press was invited and during which Mr. Nyberg acted as master of ceremonies. A toast was offered to the Swedish Engineers of America, especially those of Chicago.

    Secretary Akerlind's address is 1702 Railway Exchange Bldg.

    "Swedish Engineers Society" is the name given to a society organized last Saturday evening, the function of which will be to furnish an exchange of views between Swedish engineers of ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- November 05, 1908
    Sweden's History of Long Ago

    Oscar Montelius gave a lecture Thursday evening at Association Hall, 155 La Salle Street, and although his lecture was important enough to attract a large crowd, the attendance was smaller than expected.

    The lecture was the first of three arranged by the Swedish Historical Society of America. Dr. Joshua Lindahl introduced Professor Montelius.

    Professor Montelius, a lecturer of great ability, spoke on "Iron Ages," a subject in which he is Sweden's foremost authority. He limited his lecture to a discussion of the use of iron from the so-called historical period to the period when its use became universal.

    The Iron Age varies in different countries. In Scandinavia iron was first used about 400 years B. C. instead of bronze.

    It was the latter half of the Iron Age that the lecturer discussed. The beginning of the Iron Age in Sweden goes back a long time in history.

    2

    Although we are little acquainted with prehistorical periods in the north lands, we know iron was used there in various weapons and other articles which have been preserved since that time, that is, for about two thousand years or longer. We have been fortunate enough to discover these objects to bear witness to the early use of iron. They reveal the culture of the people, their religious habits, and the fact that our pagan forefathers lived in a higher plane of culture than is generally thought. It has been established beyond all doubt that travel between Sweden and Europe went on in those times. This fact is recorded in history where it is shown that in Southern Europe there are traces of the Swedes that went there to trade. It was just to such discoveries that Professor Montelius devoted most of his lecture. The things he explained being so important, we wonder why so many people missed the opportunity of listening to him.

    The second lecture was held Saturday evening at the Emmanuel Church on 3Sedgwick Street. As expected, the attendance at this lecture was larger than at the previous one. The lecturer explained the use of articles by our northern forefathers during the Bronze Age. Even in 1500 B. C. in the most remote parts of the land there was a culture which came in contact with the European and Greek cultures. It is thus that we account for traces of foreign influence in the North, and influence which reveals itself in our forefathers' methods of manufacture and their records of foreign trade. In those times both iron and silver were unknown, and all weapons were made of bronze or gold. Copper and tin, the raw materials for bronze, were purchased from other countries. This is born by the fact that although copper mines were unknown in Sweden, its inhabitants made many articles of molded bronze. The speaker showed pictures of bronze swords, axes, needles, and other articles, explaining their development, both as to use and ornamentation.

    Men's wearing apparel during these old periods was made of wool and was 4held up by a belt or strap over the shoulders. Women's dresses were made of the same material, and their headdresses were similar to the ones of today. One of the most important accomplishments was the way in which our ancestors chipped stones during the Bronze age. Writing was unknown then, and our only clues to this old culture are the objects that were used.

    These articles show that the prehistoric Northerners owned animals and implements to cultivate the land, that they planted oats, wheat, and corn, and that rye was unknown. Toward the end of his lecture the professor spoke of a time 2,500 or 3,000 years ago when the waters of the Adriatic extended over the Alps and to the foot of Denmark.

    On Friday evening the Swedish Historical Society gave a banquet in honor of Professor Montelius. This banquet was original in that the guests did not have to listen to any speeches.

    Oscar Montelius gave a lecture Thursday evening at Association Hall, 155 La Salle Street, and although his lecture was important enough to attract a large crowd, the attendance was smaller ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II B 2 c