The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 25, 1893
    "The Vikings".

    "The Vikings"has the reputation of being the most lively and industrious of Swedish societies. It is about to open a free Swedish Reading-room on Chicago Avenue, where Swedish newspapers from all parts of Sweden and in America together with other useful and up to date literature will be available for the visitors.

    But as it costs money to rent, arrange and maintain such an institution, the Swedish Theater Society will give a pageant at Criterion next Sunday, January 29, and "The Vikings" a concert at Turner Hall the following Sunday, February 5th. The net income from both these activities goes to the Reading-room Fund; and to make the foundation of this fund as large as possible our countrymen ought to attend both of these benefit affairs.

    "The Vikings"has the reputation of being the most lively and industrious of Swedish societies. It is about to open a free Swedish Reading-room on Chicago Avenue, where Swedish newspapers from ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 1 d, II B 2 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 01, 1893
    Amusements.

    The Independent Order of Vikings will arrange a Grand Concert for the benefit of a Swedish Reading-room Sunday, February 5th at 8 P.M. at Turner Hall on the north side.

    The program is well chosen and consists of orchestra music, songs by a quartet and by soloists, and recitations.

    Addresses will be delivered by Harry Olson and Robert Lindblom. Tickets are only 50 cents.

    The Independent Order of Vikings will arrange a Grand Concert for the benefit of a Swedish Reading-room Sunday, February 5th at 8 P.M. at Turner Hall on the north side. ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 2 a, II B 1 d, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- December 11, 1901
    Svea Society's New Home

    Chicago's oldest Swedish organization, The Svea Society, will soon move into a new home at Belmont and Lakeview Avenues. The address is 1205 Belmont Avenue. Here, the members will be much better accommodated, with a large meeting hall, a service room, a library, and smoking and reading rooms. On the opening day, Editor F. A. Lindstrand made a fine speech, and Miss Mary Nelson sang several numbers in a beautiful voice and pleasing manner.

    The Society was organized as the Inca Society in 1857, and was incorporated in 1862. Its first meeting place was at Wells and Kinzie Streets. The founders of the Society include some of our best-known countrymen: Captain Halbrand, ex-Sheriff Nelson, Captain Molenborg, P. J. Hussander, Mr. Billings, and Mr. Jocknick.

    One of the Society's oldest living members is Mr. Sven Olin, who became a member in 1859.

    2

    In the year 1883, the Society added a sick benefit department, which also pays death benefits. The members pay into this fund $6 annually; a $6 weekly sick benefit is paid out, and $50 towards funeral expenses. About $10,500 has been distributed for these purposes. The Society has among its assets a reserve fund of $4,500, an additional $3,000 invested in property, and a library containing 1500 volumes.

    Our well-known countryman, George J. Olson, county agent, is president of the Society. The Board of Directors consists of John G. Hullgren, John Lindgren, Charles Funk, A. W. Nelson, John E. Tengberg, and Peter Nelson. The present membership is more than 150, which number, we are told, will soon be doubled, in view of the fact that Svea now can entertain its members and friends in these splendid new quarters.

    Chicago's oldest Swedish organization, The Svea Society, will soon move into a new home at Belmont and Lakeview Avenues. The address is 1205 Belmont Avenue. Here, the members will be ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, II B 2 a, IV
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 09, 1903
    [The Society Svea Elects]

    On Thursday, June 4, the Society Svea held its semi-annual meeting at its meeting hall, corner of Belmont and Racine Avenues. Officers were elected as follows: President, J. G. Hultgren; vice-president, Axel E. Back; recording secretary, A. E. Peterson; financial secretary, Charles T. Funk; treasurer, A. W. Nelson; librarian, J. E. Tengberg; sergeant at arms, P. A. Nieman. At present, the society owns the largest Swedish library in America.

    On Thursday, June 4, the Society Svea held its semi-annual meeting at its meeting hall, corner of Belmont and Racine Avenues. Officers were elected as follows: President, J. G. Hultgren; ...

    Swedish
    II D 1, II B 2 a
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 07, 1904
    A Scandinavian "People's House" in Chicago (Editorial)

    From time to time the question has come up why we Chicago Swedes do not procure our own building, a Swedish "People's House," such as they have in many cities in Sweden, which would serve as a central meeting place for the discussion of our own affairs. The money which we now spend for rent of halls could then be diverted to other purposes, and such a building would, of course, tie closer together the various Swedish societies in Chicago.

    These were the points stressed in the invitation issued by the Verdande Lodge for a massmeeting last Sunday in Jaeger's Hall, but, we are sorry to report, the public did not respond in such numbers as one would expect for this occasion, so important to Swedish interests.

    2

    However, the meeting took place, and a number of worthy proposals were discussed. A Swedish Finlander and a newspaper man brought up the idea of a Scandinavian "People's House," and pointed out the many advantages of such a project, one of them being the great energy and enthusiasm displayed by our Scandinavian neighbors--the Norwegians, Danes, and Finlanders--for undertakings of this kind.

    Many speakers supported the proposition, and a ten-man committee was appointed and instructed to get in touch with the Scandinavian organizations, particularly on the North Side, requesting them to send delegates to another meeting, to be held in the near future, and where the question of a Scandinavian "People's House" will be discussed from all angles.

    The committee was instructed to study and make suggestions in regard to the 3financing of the project, location, building plans, and other details.

    When this preliminary survey is completed, a meeting is to be called of all the Scandinavian delegates. The latter should be authorized to speak for their respective organizations, so that definite decisions may be made. New proposals are, of course, gratefully received.

    Nearly everybody present at the meeting seemed to be inspired by the idea; only a few expressed their doubt as to the desirability and practicability of such an undertaking by Chicago's Scandinavians, and they did not succeed in discouraging the rest.

    For many decades now the Scandinavians have kept on coming to this great Western Hemisphere, tempted by enticing stories of dollars and gold, and more "milk and honey" than can be found in the countries of the north. When 4the young Swede, the young Finn, the young Dane, and the young Norwegian set their feet on American soil they usually lose track of the friends and acquaintances which they have acquired during the voyage across the ocean; they scatter to the north, south, east, and west, and our immigrant finds himself alone. In some cases he has relatives and friends to go to, but most newcomers are complete strangers. The Scandinavian immigrant then looks for an organization of his countrymen, where he may find sympathy and strike up new friendships. This is not always so easy, unacquainted as he is with the city and the language. In a centrally located Scandinavian "People's House" he has a good opportunity to attend the meetings of various types of organizations and to join those that appeal to him. A home of this kind here in Chicago would undoubtedly give the impulse for the establishment of similar institutions in other cities with a considerable Scandinavian population.

    In the same manner that the individual feels the need of associating with others of his kind, and just as this association is beneficial if properly 5chosen, so it would be a great boon to Scandinavian brotherhood and cooperation if this plan could become a reality, including at least the societies of the North and Northwest Side of the city; the South siders are probably too far removed from the center of the Scandinavian population to take advantage of this opportunity.

    This is indeed a great cause, worthy of the most wise and energetic leadership that can be obtained.

    It is not out of order already at this point to begin to picture the interior of this future "People's House," the exterior we will leave to the contractors and architects. The layout must be carefully planned. There must be of course, a large auditorium, suitable for theatre and concert performances, with up-to-date stage facilities. Every effort should be made to make this auditorium spacious, dignified, and beautiful. This is desirable not only from the 6esthetic but also from the financial point of view, with an eye to profitable renting. It is particularly important that this auditorium be so planned that the greatest Swedish (also the greatest Scandinavian) organization in Chicago--The Swedish National League--will find it suitable for its needs. We all know what immense sums the league pays out in rent alone for its annual events, for instance in the Auditorium. In addition to this large room, several smaller ones, suitable for lodge and club meetings, should be provided for. There should also be a library and reading room, well stocked with selected literature and newspapers, as well as a lecture room and a gymnasium. A restaurant, smoking room, and a bowling alley should not be lacking.

    Up to now there has been little or no association and cooperation among the four Scandinavian brother nationalities in this city. The proposed "People's House" would be a strong instrument for unity, replacing dissention and jealousy with concord and friendliness.

    7

    You, Scandinavian individuals and organizations, do not treat this cause with arrogant contempt, and do not take it for granted that this plan cannot be materialized just because it did not originate with you or your organization; and do not shake your head at the name "People's House."

    At this stage of advanced civilization and progressive enlightenment, those that already enjoy the advantages of education, culture, and wealth, should not make it their business to resist the intellectual progress of the masses; it is rather their privilege, for instance, by means of such a "People's House," to contribute generously to the knowledge and education of their less privileged fellow human beings, through lectures, discussions, and the like.

    Take the constructive, progressive attitude and remember that "many small creeks make the big river."

    From time to time the question has come up why we Chicago Swedes do not procure our own building, a Swedish "People's House," such as they have in many cities ...

    Swedish
    II D 6, II B 2 a, III A, III G, I A 3, II D 6, II D 6
  • Svenska Nyheter -- February 14, 1905
    Swedish Books in the Public Library

    During the past days the Chicago Public Library has had its collection of Swedish books greatly increased, and the books that have been added are valuable. The directors of the library have sent us a list of the new books, but the list is so extensive that we simply cannot spare the space for it. Hitherto, Norway and Denmark have greatly outshone Sweden on the shelves of the library; and Sweden has been treated as a stepchild in comparison, chiefly because no advocate of Swedish literature has been a member of the library board. Now there is a Swedish-American on the board in the person of Editor F. A. Lindstrand, and thanks to his interest and energy, the committee on new books decided to buy these books, which have just arrived from Sweden.

    During the past days the Chicago Public Library has had its collection of Swedish books greatly increased, and the books that have been added are valuable. The directors of the ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 a, I F 4
  • Svenska Nyheter -- May 16, 1905
    [Scandinavian Books in University of Chicago]

    A valuable collection of Old Norse books has been acquired by the Scandinavian department of the University of Chicago, through the generosity of a Norwegian, Paul O. Stensland. The collection comprises no less than 1,250 bound volumes, and consists mainly of works on saga literature.

    Earlier the books formed part of the library of the famous historian Von Maurer, which had come into the possession of Harvard University. The reason for Harvard's willingness to part with the books was the fact that Harvard had recently acquired a similar collection, a fact which in itself testifies to the great scientific value of the collection. Among the philologists, Saga collectors, and critics represented in the collection we may mention names such as: Grundtvig and Suhm, Aasen and Bugge, Bjorner and Geijer, Munch, Daae, Hildebrand, Keyser, Afzelius, Unger, Wimmer, Brandes.

    2

    Those among the Scandinavians who, like Paul Stensland, are awake to the significance of our race in the history of the world, will greet with joy the founding of this Nordic university library. To be sure, this is merely a small beginning. The Scandinavian countries, especially if acting together, should be able to compete with practically any of the great cultural nations in regard to book culture. Of course, twelve hundred fifty volumes of almost exclusively Old Norse literature is a nice start. Yet it presents merely a faint conception of the vastness of this literature, still less of the Scandinavian literature as a whole. Even so, the Stensland collection forms a good basis on which the Chicago Scandinavians may hope, little by little, to build a university library that will form a worthy reflection of the culture of the North.

    A valuable collection of Old Norse books has been acquired by the Scandinavian department of the University of Chicago, through the generosity of a Norwegian, Paul O. Stensland. The collection ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 a
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- October 22, 1907
    Oscar Ii's Traveling Library

    The Oscar II's Traveling Library was organized Jan. 21, 1906, for the purpose of supplying books to national travelers and Swedish-Americans. This library has already sent out free of charge a large number of books to various libraries and Swedish societies and congregations. The books deal on various subjects and are written by Swedish writers.

    The organization has about 50,000 volumes, which are given out through five hundred branches. All books are given out by the Literature Committee which consists of Professor Warberg and Doctor Karlfedt. The management is in Stockholm under the control of the King. All countrymen interested may write for further information to Consul Lindgren, Chicago, Ill.

    The Oscar II's Traveling Library was organized Jan. 21, 1906, for the purpose of supplying books to national travelers and Swedish-Americans. This library has already sent out free of charge ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 a, III H
  • Svenska Kuriren -- October 26, 1907
    King Oscar Ii's Lending Library

    The lending library of King Oscar II which was instituted in January 1906 for the purpose of providing a National link between the Swedes abroad and the ones in the old country, has now sent out books to various places in the world. Several books have arrived in the United States to be distributed free of charge and on a lending basis among Swedish societies and assemblies. The books, written by many prominent authors, deal on various topics. These lending libraries will be a substitute for the permanent larger libraries. All books are chosen by a literary committee under Professor Warburg and Dr. Karlfeldt. The Board of Directors' office is in Stockholm, Sweden, under control of the King of Sweden. Those of our countrymen interested in this matter can obtain further information through Consul Lindgren, Chicago.

    The lending library of King Oscar II which was instituted in January 1906 for the purpose of providing a National link between the Swedes abroad and the ones in the ...

    Swedish
    III H, II B 2 a
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- June 16, 1908
    Swedish Historical Society of America

    The Swedish Historical Society has recently acquired a large addition to its library from the Engberg-Holmberg Publishing Company in Chicago. They gave samples of all publications of which the firm owned more than one volume, amounting to more than four hundred volumes. Among the donated books, we find that many belonged to other publishers which the above mentioned publishing company had purchased from such companies as the Swedish Lutheran Publication Society, Julin & Hedenberg, Julin & Rylander, A. Hult, Wistrand & Thulin, J. T. Relling Company, Enander & Boman, and Sangen Publishing 2Company. The oldest printed book in this collection goes back about fifty years. A complete set of the firm's catalogues, old and new, were included in the donation. The library of the Swedish Historical Society consists of about one thousand volumes, the largest part of which is printed in America by Swedish publishers. The Augustana Book concern, and the Methodist Book concern have also donated from their collections. Even from Sweden, valuable gifts have been received from the Academy of Stockholm, and P. A. Nerstedt & Sons. From the Government's Archives in Stockholm, a large shipment is on the way.

    The library of Uppala University has promised to send what they can of their 3volumes where they have duplicates that might be of interest to us. The generous Swedish-Americans have also wonderfully supplied the library with books. Among them is a very valuable selection of Swedish-American newspapers donated by Consul G. N. Swan of Sioux City, Iowa, Prof. C. W. Foss, of Rock Island, and also from the Augustana College.

    The Swedish Historical Society has recently acquired a large addition to its library from the Engberg-Holmberg Publishing Company in Chicago. They gave samples of all publications of which the firm ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 c, II B 2 a, III H