The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Times -- January 30, 1875
    Thomas Paine's Birthday Anniversary Was Celebrated by the Scandinavians Yesterday.

    The Skandinaviske Frioenker Forening, or the Scandinavian Free Thinking Society, of this city, held its eighth annual celebration commemorating the 138th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Paine, last evening, at Orpheus Hall, on the corner of West Lake and Peoria Streets. The society was established nine years ago and consists at present of about one hundred members, the majority of whom are Swedes and Norwegians. They hold their regular sessions at No. 113 Milwaukee Avenue, where they meet twice a month and advocate the principles of their leader.

    About nine o'clock the hall was filled with a large representation of the Scandinavian race of both sexes, a number of the latter (women) having been attracted by the festivities which the latter part of the program offered.

    Upon the platform of the stage stood a rough representation of the Goddess of Liberty, and upon the pedestal which supported it were inscribed the words, "Friheds 2Gudinde Dit Nawn Er Godt Spred Sandheds Wisdoms Lys Fra Bol Til Bol."Goddess of Liberty, thy name is good. Spread the light of truth and wisdom from pole to pole." Over the center of the stage hung suspended a portrait of Paine, surrounded by a sketch designed to represent the American eagle, carrying in his beak the usual streamers, which bore the motto, "Frem itiden Komer Sandhedens Lys," or "In the future the light of truth will come." From the balconies on either side, the banners of the different nations represented alongside of the American flag were unfurled and the whole apartment was arranged with reference to the occasion. After an overture by the Exposition band, which furnished the music for the evening, Dr. G. Paoli, the president of the society, made an eloquent address in the Scandinavian tongue, eulogizing the founder of their principles of belief, and expressing himself as opposed to the religious doctrines propagated in this country. The president was succeeded by Gen. I.N.Stiles, whom he introduced to the audience as one of the strongest and most sincere free-thinkers in the city.

    Gen. Stiles began by stating that liberty might well point to Thomas Paine, for he was her noble son; genius might point to him also, for he was her brother. Few men 3were abused as much as he had been because he did not agree with the majority. The thinkers, the men who moved the world, always started from among the minority, and labored among the many. Paine had been calumniated because he had dared to think for himself, and had set priests at defiance. The world was his country, he said, and to do good was his religion. The speaker challenged any one to find a sentence uttered by Paine which had ever savored of immorality. He had thought for himself, and had then doubted that God could be such as Moses had described him. Nothing so delighted him (God) as a sacrifice, and what pleased Him above all things was the blood of women and children. Paine had defied the priests of the so-called Christian religion to demonstrate to him that God was a being of such atrocious cruelty. When men come to think for themselves, they no longer desired the services of a priest. The priest insisted that fixed belief should be indoctrinated in the minds of children when they were too young to use their reason. In that they were mistaken. In addition to his doctrines of free thought, Paine had advocated the principles of liberty, and aided Jefferson and Adams in establishing a republic in this country. No man had done so much to impress the American people with the importance of independent thought and action. The nineteenth century had produced her Darwin, 4her Tyndall, and her Huxley, and the time was not far distant when the people could embrace the doctrines of liberty and truth.

    Marc Trans was the next speaker. He began by giving a sketch of the life of Thomas Paine. He considered him the real founder of the republic, because the idea of liberty and free thought originated with him. Paine was not only a speaker and a writer, but an actor as well, for he had served as a soldier in defense of his country. It is Tom Paine the people should thank for the free institutions of this country, nothwithstanding the fact that the press and the pulpit had united to caluminate him; that he was not held in greater estimation did not speak well for the character of the American people.

    At the conclusion of the addresses, which were received with enthusiastic applause, the hall was cleared, and dancing succeeded, a part of the program which continued until an early hour in the morning.

    The Skandinaviske Frioenker Forening, or the Scandinavian Free Thinking Society, of this city, held its eighth annual celebration commemorating the 138th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Paine, last evening, ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 d, II B 1 d
  • Svenska Tribunen -- November 09, 1892
    The Swedish Journalists of Chicago

    The Swedish-American Publicists club of Chicago hold its regular meeting last Saturday in the Sherman House. A motion was carried to have the by-laws changed to read that the officers of the club should be elected for terms of six instead of twelve months. In accordance with this decision, an election of officers was held, resulting as follows; P. A. Sundelius, pres.; Alex, J. Johnson, 1st. vice-pres.; Algot E. Strand, 2nd. vice-pres.; F. A. Lindstrand, 3rd. vice-pres.; Nils Mannow, secretary, and A. Chaiser, treasurer.

    The Swedish-American Publicists club of Chicago hold its regular meeting last Saturday in the Sherman House. A motion was carried to have the by-laws changed to read that the officers ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 d
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 25, 1893
    "The Vikings".

    "The Vikings"has the reputation of being the most lively and industrious of Swedish societies. It is about to open a free Swedish Reading-room on Chicago Avenue, where Swedish newspapers from all parts of Sweden and in America together with other useful and up to date literature will be available for the visitors.

    But as it costs money to rent, arrange and maintain such an institution, the Swedish Theater Society will give a pageant at Criterion next Sunday, January 29, and "The Vikings" a concert at Turner Hall the following Sunday, February 5th. The net income from both these activities goes to the Reading-room Fund; and to make the foundation of this fund as large as possible our countrymen ought to attend both of these benefit affairs.

    "The Vikings"has the reputation of being the most lively and industrious of Swedish societies. It is about to open a free Swedish Reading-room on Chicago Avenue, where Swedish newspapers from ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 1 d, II B 2 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 01, 1893
    Amusements.

    The Independent Order of Vikings will arrange a Grand Concert for the benefit of a Swedish Reading-room Sunday, February 5th at 8 P.M. at Turner Hall on the north side.

    The program is well chosen and consists of orchestra music, songs by a quartet and by soloists, and recitations.

    Addresses will be delivered by Harry Olson and Robert Lindblom. Tickets are only 50 cents.

    The Independent Order of Vikings will arrange a Grand Concert for the benefit of a Swedish Reading-room Sunday, February 5th at 8 P.M. at Turner Hall on the north side. ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 2 a, II B 1 d, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 21, 1899
    The Polar Star Society

    The Polar Star Society is the name a newly organized literary society has adopted. Even people outside Chicago are entitled to join the society; its main purpose is to translate books of prominent Swedish authors into English. Among those whose works are going to see the light of day in English dress are King Oscar II, Viktor Rydberg, August Strindberg, Gustav av Geijerstam, Alfred Hedenstierna (Sigurd), Henrik Wraner, and others.

    Nineteen works are already translated, ready for the printing press. Mr. Andrew Schon is president of the society and Albert Alberg, well known author and translator is secretary.

    The Polar Star Society is the name a newly organized literary society has adopted. Even people outside Chicago are entitled to join the society; its main purpose is to translate ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 d
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 27, 1901
    Lecture at Swedish Cultural Institute

    The Swedish Cultural Institute at Spelz Hall, at North Clark Street in Lake View, last Sunday was well attended. The program offered a beautiful solo by Dr. E. O. Benson, who sang "Du Gamla, Du Friska, Du F Jallhoga Nord" ( Thou Old, Thou Sound, Thou North With Mountains High").

    After this followed two excellent violin solos by Professor C. F. Frederickson, a masterful temperance declamation by Miss Elizabeth Swanstrom, and an especially pithy lecture on the care of health, by Dr. C.O. Young. Next Sunday, editor A. Shon will deliver a lecture at the same place on Erik Janssonism in Helsingland, whose followers emigrated at last, and founded the colony of Bishop Hill in Illinois.

    The program will also offer songs, music and declamations. The lecture will begin at three P.M. Admission is free.

    The Swedish Cultural Institute at Spelz Hall, at North Clark Street in Lake View, last Sunday was well attended. The program offered a beautiful solo by Dr. E. O. Benson, ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d, III F
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 13, 1901
    Swedish Cultural Institute

    p.11. Last Saturday, Pastor G. A. Hagstrom, gave an interesting and educational lecture on the subject: "World Conditions at the Time of Christ's Appearance." This was followed by singing by Miss Frida Eklund.

    Next Sunday, Professor Nyvall, President of North Park College, will lecture on "The Meaning of Fantasy in Relation to Character," after which the Mozart Octett and Chorus, under the direction of Mr. Dufvas, will entertain. The lecture will begin at three P.M. sharp. Admission is free. All countrymen are cordially invited.

    p.11. Last Saturday, Pastor G. A. Hagstrom, gave an interesting and educational lecture on the subject: "World Conditions at the Time of Christ's Appearance." This was followed by singing by ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d, II B 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 20, 1901
    Swedish Cultural Institute Lecture

    p.11...................The Swedish Cultural Institute's Lecture was held last Sunday afternoon at Spelz Hall in Lake View before a full house. After a male chorus, under Mr. Dufvas' direction had rendered two beautiful Swedish songs, Professor D. Nyvall, President of North Park College gave a very interesting lecture on "The Meaning of Fantesy in Regard to Character." The justly famous Mapart Octette then sang two songs, which were well received by the audience. Mr. Frithiof Malmquist recited between the numbers the poem "Sveaborg" by John Ludvig Runeberg.

    Next Sunday at three P.M. C. A. Evald will deliver a lecture entitled "Greetings from the Reformation's Homeland." The program also offers music and song by the best of talent.

    Countrymen and country-women are most heartily invited. Admission is free.

    p.11...................The Swedish Cultural Institute's Lecture was held last Sunday afternoon at Spelz Hall in Lake View before a full house. After a male chorus, under Mr. Dufvas' direction had rendered ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d, II B 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 03, 1901
    Swedish Cultural Institute

    p.11..... The lecture at the Swedish Cultural Institute at Speltz Hall, Lake View, last Sunday afternoon was attended by an attentive audience. Countrymen and Countrywomen from both the South and West sides attended, but, strangely enough there were fewer from Lake View than expected from that section.

    Miss Margaret Dahlstrom sang a very beautiful song, accompanied by Mrs. Engstrom. Pastor Leonard Stromberg gave a lecture on "Religion and Culture". It was characterized by lofty ideals and noble thought. After this Mr. A. Hagman sang two Swedish songs. They were request numbers. The program ended with a declamation concerning the native land.

    Next Sunday at three P.M. the well-known Editor, Poet and Man of Letters, Dr. Jacob Bonggren will lecture on Swedish, and Swedish-American Literature. During The Last Twenty Years."

    2

    Other numbers on the program will be music and song.

    Since meetings of various kinds are held at the same time in different halls in the same building,it is to be carefully noted that the Cultural Institute Lectures are held in the large hall. Its entrance is to the right at the top of the stairs.

    Admission is free, and the lectures begin at three P.M. sharp. Those who wish to secure good seats should come early.

    p.11..... The lecture at the Swedish Cultural Institute at Speltz Hall, Lake View, last Sunday afternoon was attended by an attentive audience. Countrymen and Countrywomen from both the South and ...

    Swedish
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 08, 1901
    Alpha Literary Club

    p.11...................A banquet was given at the Boston Oyster House last Saturday evening, by former members of the now disbanded Alpha Literary Club. The banquet was given in honor of Dr. August Anderson's visit to this city. Mr. Anderson is on his way to Germany.

    Master of ceremonies at the richly laden table was Dr. Emil Benson. Many old memories were revised during the evening.

    p.11...................A banquet was given at the Boston Oyster House last Saturday evening, by former members of the now disbanded Alpha Literary Club. The banquet was given in honor of Dr. ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 d, IV