The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- November 06, 1901
    [Art Exhibit in Progress]

    An art exhibit is being held at the Art Institute, showing American paintings and sculptures. The displays number more than five hundred. Mr. Alfred Jansson and Bror Julius Olson Nordfelt are among the exhibitors.

    An art exhibit is being held at the Art Institute, showing American paintings and sculptures. The displays number more than five hundred. Mr. Alfred Jansson and Bror Julius Olson Nordfelt ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 c
  • Svenska Tribunen -- December 11, 1901
    Wedding Guest

    Miss Elin Lindholm, from Norrkoping, Sweden, is visiting Chicago for the purpose of attending the wedding of her sister Miss Ida Lindholm to Dr. D. S. Tarelins .....

    Miss Lindholm is a popular artist. She has several canvases on display at the Art Institute, some of which have won great acclaim. On her way back to Sweden, she will visit South America and portions of Southern Europe.

    Miss Elin Lindholm, from Norrkoping, Sweden, is visiting Chicago for the purpose of attending the wedding of her sister Miss Ida Lindholm to Dr. D. S. Tarelins ..... Miss Lindholm ...

    Swedish
    I C, II A 3 c
  • Svenska Nyheter -- December 01, 1903
    A Swedish-American Mansion in Chicago by Algot E. Strand

    Not many years ago it was considered quite an event among Swedish-Americans in Chicago when one of them was able to build a cottage or a two-story frame house for his family. To be able to erect such a home required many years of strenuous effort and many sacrifices by the man and his family. Only the necessities of life could be provided during this period.

    Usually, the Swede who wanted his own home would start by investing his savings with some building and loan association. During the period when these associations flourished, it was usually possible, after eight or ten years, for the investor to withdraw the amount which he had placed with the association plus the accrued earnings.

    Frequently, the first aim of the future home-owner was to save enough so that the sum due when the shares matured would amount to one thousand 2dollars. With this sum he would buy a building lot, and with this lot as security, he would then borrow enough money from the association to enable him to build a nice frame house. The loan would be repaid by continuing his monthly deposits with the association as before. When the payments were all made, he would then own his home free of debt.

    Most of the Swedish immigrants who own their homes have acquired them in the manner just described. The building and loan associations, when honestly managed, have been of great benefit to our people, and although the borrowers were made to pay a rather high rate of interest, yet when the loan was repaid they found themselves in a far better position then those who had been paying rent to others. These tenants have no other prospect than simply to go on paying rent, until somebody is compelled to buy a lot for them--in the cemetery.

    Among our Swedish immigrants there is a class of people who, at least during an earlier period,have earned much money. They are the tailors 3who use factory methods. Those who have been satisfied to limit their activity to tailoring alone have frequently become the owners of a considerable amount of real estate and other assets, which usually include elegant homes.

    Among the Swedes who started as mercantile tailors, there are not many, on the other hand, who have been successful, whatever the reason for their failure may be. It may well be that in most cases these men were so anxious to do business that they became too liberal in granting credit.

    The Swedish mercantile tailor who has undoubtedly been most successful is Frank A. Rose, whose home is located at 2857 Kenmore Avenue, not far from the lake. The decoration of this home is worthy of notice.... The house has been occupied by the Rose family for about two years, but not until this fall was the interior decoration completed. Our well-known fresco painter, Olof Nilsson, 1656 Dewey Place, has done the decorating, 4and the result is unusually beautiful.

    Mr. Olof Nilsson, who did the beautiful decorating of this house, was born on April 15, 1842. He studied decorating at the technology school in Stockholm, Sweden, where he was graduated with excellent marks and where he received a medal for his work.

    In 1868 he emigrated to America, and after a stay of two years in Philadelphia he came to Chicago. During the years 1875-1876, Mr. Nilsson did a piece of decorating which evoked much admiration and many favorable comments. This was the decoration of the rotunda and the great dining hall in the Palmer House, unquestionably at the time the most elegant hotel in Chicago. Since then he has decorated churches, theatres, and numerous private residences.

    He is a jolly, agreeable man to know, a mighty Nimrod, and a worthy follower of Isaac walton. He is an Odd Fellow, but more than that he is a "good fellow."

    Not many years ago it was considered quite an event among Swedish-Americans in Chicago when one of them was able to build a cottage or a two-story frame house for ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 c, I D 1 b, II A 2, IV
  • Svenska Nyheter -- February 14, 1905
    Swedish-American Society of Art

    On the initiative of C. J. Nilsson the sculptor, 774 Racine Avenue, a number of Swedish artists met last Thursday evening at Hotel Bismarck in this city, to discuss the organizing of a Swedish-American society of art. All those present were in favor of the organization of an art society, the purpose of which will be, among other things, to develop co-operation between Swedish artists and Swedish-American artists and to arrange for annual exhibitions of art in Chicago.

    A second conference, to which all the Swedish artists in Chicago are to be invited, is to be held at the same place on this coming Friday, at 8 P.M. At that meeting proposals for statutes will be discussed, and the organization may take place. It is intended to push the matter so as to make it possible 2to present an art exhibition next spring.

    On the initiative of C. J. Nilsson the sculptor, 774 Racine Avenue, a number of Swedish artists met last Thursday evening at Hotel Bismarck in this city, to discuss the ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 c, III H
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- July 10, 1906
    A Seascape Masterpiece

    Our well-known seascape artist, Charles Hallberg of Chicago, has recently completed a work of art that is the most impressive modern painting we have seen exhibited. In painting pictures like the traditional "Flying Dutchman" Mr. Hallberg has attained the most natural effect by the high running foam-tipped billows. One can almost see and hear the great waves as they strike the two boats.

    Of the two boats, which are similar in type, the ghost effect of the "Flying Dutchman" in this picture makes one think that the traditional boat still plows the seas and can, under certain conditions, be seen today.

    Few modern paintings picture the spirit of the subject painted so truly that it almost speaks to those whose privilege it is to view such work. We predict a great future for one whose technique is outstanding as that of Hallberg.

    Our well-known seascape artist, Charles Hallberg of Chicago, has recently completed a work of art that is the most impressive modern painting we have seen exhibited. In painting pictures like ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 c, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- August 07, 1906
    [Swedish Marine Artist]

    Charles E. Hallberg, Chicago's eminent Swedish marine painter, has recently obtained copyrights for his paintings; he is the first Western artist to be granted such rights. Mr. Hallberg intends to sell reproduction rights to some of the largest corporations in America.

    More than fifty-four thousand people have viewed Hallberg's masterpieces, on display at the Art Institute.

    A dozen of his paintings have already been sold at very good prices, and other sales will take place after the Institute exhibit. During September Mr. Hallberg will take an extended trip seeking desirable scenes for his future productions. Considering what he already has done, we eagerly look forward to seeing his future painting treasures.

    Charles E. Hallberg, Chicago's eminent Swedish marine painter, has recently obtained copyrights for his paintings; he is the first Western artist to be granted such rights. Mr. Hallberg intends to ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 c, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- August 07, 1906
    Swedish Marine Artist (Editorial)

    An outstanding member of our Swedish colony is Charles E. Hallberg. There are exceedingly few "knights of the palette" who devote their time, even in part, to the marine branch of painting.

    Very few have ever pictured the deep sea and its violent waves. Among the few are two American artists, Cleveland Rockwell and Alexander Harrison, whose true-to-nature paintings have brought them fame.

    Charles E. Hallberg is not only the equal of the two most famous painters of this type in America, but in several phases of sea views he unquestionably even surpasses them, and our Swedish colony is justly proud of him.

    Hallberg was born in Goteborg, Sweden in 1855, where, while attending school, 2his regular studies were secondary in his desire and ambition. As a boy, during his study periods, textbooks were often left unopened while the pencil was plied with a magic touch.

    Charles Hallberg is known today as one of America's greatest artists, especially in the circle favoring marine pictures. Among his highly esteemed paintings we would mention the realistic "In the Teeth of the Gale", "Returning Fishermen", "Sunrise--Lake Michigan" (which reveals the poetic nature of Mr. H.).

    "Off the Isle of Wight" is painted with the most brutal realism of any painting we have seen. In viewing this painting, no aesthetic sensibility is required to hear the creaking of the straining timbers of the boat, and the savage, voracious sound of the stormy billows. One is carried away inadvertently by the spirit of the picture. All his paintings specify the time of day they represent; "Evening at Sea" and "Morning After the Storm" exemplify the contrast.

    3

    Among our American artists, Mr. Hallberg occupies an independent and individual pedestal, his right to which has been won by his exclusive and energetic application to the art he has loved from childhood until today. Among marine painters he ranks first, a fact which is admitted by the best painters of land or sea.

    An outstanding member of our Swedish colony is Charles E. Hallberg. There are exceedingly few "knights of the palette" who devote their time, even in part, to the marine branch ...

    Swedish
    II A 3 c, IV
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 25, 1908
    The Swedish National Society

    Last Sunday night, the Swedish National Society celebrated its Midwinter festival at the Auditorium by presenting an historical play by Zacharias Topelius, called "Gustaf II Adolf and Regina von Emmeritz." It was played by The Swedish Dramatical Society, assisted by Harmony Singing Club, Scandia Gymnastics Athletic Club, and John Meck's orchestra. Before the performance started, a bust of King Oscar II was presented by Attorney G. B. Anderson to the Swedish National Society on behalf of the Swedish Dramatical Society, and modeled by the sculpture C. J. Nilsson. Miss Ida Ostergren and Prof. John R. Ortengren played the leading roles in the performance. The net income of the festival goes to charity.

    Last Sunday night, the Swedish National Society celebrated its Midwinter festival at the Auditorium by presenting an historical play by Zacharias Topelius, called "Gustaf II Adolf and Regina von Emmeritz." ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 d, II A 3 c, III B 2, II D 10, IV
  • Svenska Kuriren -- April 11, 1908
    Swedish May Festival

    The skilled marine artist, Charles E. Hallberg, intends to hold an exposition of his best and newest paintings at Austin Library Hall, May 15 and 16. The first evening, an English program for the American public will be presented for those interested in Mr. Hallberg's work. The second evening, a Swedish song and musical program will be given. Editor Anna S. Swenson will deliver an address, entitled: "Swedish-American art and music."

    The skilled marine artist, Charles E. Hallberg, intends to hold an exposition of his best and newest paintings at Austin Library Hall, May 15 and 16. The first evening, an ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II A 3 c, II B 1 a, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- March 02, 1909
    A Notable Swedish Artist

    Swedish-American painting has several notable representatives in Chicago and among them is Charles E. Hallberg of 1013 North Park Avenue. Within art circles he has been holding the limelight since, a short time ago, one of his finest paintings, "The Atlantic," was procured by the Goeteborg Art Museum, Goeteborg, Sweden, which is known for its high standards, and the critical care with which it adds to its collections. As the name implies the painting has a marine motif, depicting the magnificent ocean in natural color nuances, with a sunbathed sky, drifting clouds, and majestic, white-topped waves. Nature's awe-inspiring beauty as seen by the loving eyes, and felt by the receptive mind, of a worshiping artist, has been masterfully reproduced. For a long time the ocean was Hallberg's home, and he has loved it ever since.

    Born in Goeteborg in 1855 into a poor home, he went to sea at an early age. The inborn artistic instinct which had been awakened within the boy during visits to the art treasures in the galleries of his home city,blossomed out 2in the young mariner under the stimulus of sunsets on the ocean and other beauty impressions which flooded his impressionable mind during his travels on the seven seas.

    About twenty years ago he left the sea and came to Chicago where he obtained employment as a watchman in a bank. He fitted out a studio in the basement and began seriously to devote all his spare time to painting.

    Almost without any formal instruction, and under economic difficulties, he progressed, thanks to his iron will and artistic ambition, and was finally rewarded when two of his paintings were accepted by the Chicago Art Institute. Last year he exhibited several paintings at the Art Institute, including "The Atlantic" which attracted unusual attention and was valued at $800. Among his other outstanding works are "Sunrise" and "After the Storm", both with motifs from Lake Michigan, and characterized by the very individualistic conception of nature, and the remarkable choice of colors which are so typical of Hallberg.

    3

    After years of hard work and sacrifices he has now definitely "arrived": he is a member of the Chicago Society of Artists, and his name is known and respected among artists as well as among the general public.

    His countrymen have reason to be proud of Hallberg, and everybody who knows the soft-spoken and unaffected artist is happy over his success.

    Swedish-American painting has several notable representatives in Chicago and among them is Charles E. Hallberg of 1013 North Park Avenue. Within art circles he has been holding the limelight since, ...

    Swedish
    IV, II A 3 c