The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 29, 1878
    Rose Hill, a Swedish Creation.

    Rose Hill, one of Chicago's most beautiful suburbs is located a few miles north of Lincoln Park and not far from Lake Michigan. It is interesting for Swedish people to know that one of our countrymen, P.S.Peterson, has planted and is now the owner of a prominent nursery, well known, not only in Chicago, but also all over the United States for its trees which are planted along the streets and boulevards and in public, as well as in private gardens.

    Hundreds of thousands of trees from this prominent nursery have been shipped to various cities and their public parks. The gigantic elms along the beautiful boulevards on the south side of Chicago are from Rose Hill. The price for these trees varies from $25.00 up to $100.00 each.

    The owner of the Rose Hill Nursery, Mr. Peterson, a man of middle age, is 2typical of the strong sons from Sweden. He was born of poor parents at Oveds Kloster, Sweden, where he began to learn the work of gardening.

    After some study in Germany he settled in the United States and was for many years foreman at a prominent tree school in New York state. With the money he saved he came to Chicago twelve years ago and started his large business at Rose Hill, where he purchased some land at $200.00 per acre. From time to time he has expanded his business and property, until he now has planted and growing over three million young trees: elm, alder, ash, maple, and pine. Mr. Peterson has imported many trees from Europe and Scotland, 800,000 at one time. There are many trees we have in Sweden growing at Rose Hill. Many American trees have been shipped from there to Sweden and to other European countries.

    In good times the value of trees and plants shipped from Rose Hill was about fifty to sixty thousand dollars a year. The maintenance of the 3nursey is costly. Sometimes as many as forty people are employed and many of them must be very skilled....

    Rose Hill, one of Chicago's most beautiful suburbs is located a few miles north of Lincoln Park and not far from Lake Michigan. It is interesting for Swedish people to ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, II A 1, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 23, 1880
    New Invention by Captain John Ericson.

    Our great countryman, Captain John Ericson, has completed a new invention.

    The houses here are now built from eight to nine stories high in order to make expensive sites as profitable as possible. It has been impossible to bring the water up one level to another.

    Captain Ericson has now invented a pumping machine, which will force the water a considerable height. He calls this machine the caloric pump. It drives from 200 to 300 gallons of water an hour up to a height of fifty feet.

    Captain Ericson has obtained a patent on this machine. It is small, being only four feet high, and will be very practical, especially for tall buildings.

    The inventor said that he has not been working very hard on this pumping machine, but has used only his spare time on it. He doesn't think so much of it himself, 2but other professional men are of the opinion that it is of great value.

    Our great countryman, Captain John Ericson, has completed a new invention. The houses here are now built from eight to nine stories high in order to make expensive sites as ...

    Swedish
    II A 1, II A 2, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 25, 1882
    A Paradise Close to Chicago.

    EDITORIAL. The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprints an editorial from the Chicago Evening Journal concerning Mr. P.S. Peterson's Nursery at Rosehill.

    The author of this article took recently a trip north and came to a real paradise in the heart of Jefferson Township - Mr. P.S. Peterson's Nursery at Rosehill, which grand place is located not fully eight miles from the city. Lincoln Avenue goes through this glorious nursery and is a short distance from Mr. Peterson's magnificient home.

    The nursery consists of 365 acres and its owner has with care and intelligence taken care of its expansion during a quarter of a century.

    2

    The property, surrounded by tall trees and beautified with grass lawns, flower-beds and bushes, is an ideal of comfort, as well as a charming country home.

    Many of the large shade trees have been moved from other places to Rosehill by Mr. Peterson himself, and he is as attached to each one of them as if they were his own children.

    The oldest and tallest of all the trees is a stately elm. "This" - said Mr. Peterson, pointing with pride at the tree - "is George Washington, and this," pointing at another large elm, "is Abraham Lincoln, and this is General Sherman and there is General Grant."

    Mr. Peterson has millions of trees on his farm and he knows each type by sight. Most of these trees of all dimensions and types are planted in long rows and assume the appearance of large armies, regiments, brigades, and divisions. There are elms, maples, birches, ash, lark, chesnut, mulberry, and wild cherry.

    3

    In other words, every conceivable type of tree that can be grown in this latitude is ready to be re-planted. Many of them are imported from Europe and other parts of the world. Flowers, many of rare and exotic beauty, are found in abundance.

    Mr. Peterson has one of the largest and finest collections of trees, bushes, and flowers in the entire West, as well as a pleasant home.

    Mr. Peterson keeps more than twenty-five horses, and has one of the finest stables in the State of Illinois.

    EDITORIAL. The Swedish Tribune, Chicago, reprints an editorial from the Chicago Evening Journal concerning Mr. P.S. Peterson's Nursery at Rosehill. The author of this article took recently a trip north ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, II A 1, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 01, 1889
    Ingenious Invention.

    For a long time the city council has had in mind obtaining a practical machine by means of which the streets near the bridges could be shut off at the time the bridges are opened to let vessels pass by. Several accidents have occurred because of the lack of such arrangements. Many proposals have been offered to the authorities, but have not been of any practical use.

    Our countryman, P.M.Pearson, an engineer employed at the great machine building concern, Fraser & Chalmers, has constructed an automatic machine which seems to solve the problem. At the moment the bridge is opened two arms from two poles erected at each end of the street fall down and shut off all traffic until the bridge is back in its former position, when they again are lifted. These arms work automatically.

    Pearson has obtained a patent for his invention and it is to be hoped that the city council will soon be the owner of this machine.

    For a long time the city council has had in mind obtaining a practical machine by means of which the streets near the bridges could be shut off at the ...

    Swedish
    II A 1, II A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 06, 1890
    [Businessman Attacts Land Speculation]

    Robert Lindblom, the well-known Chicago Board of Trade man, was a guest speaker last Sunday evening at the meeting of "The Economic Conference". His subject was "Speculation and its bearing on prices". He made a vehement attack upon land speculation in uncultivated land in particular. He described the dangers and pitfalls of this type of speculation in a manner that won great acclaim from his listeners. The great hall was packed to capacity a full half hour before the hour scheduled for his speech.

    Robert Lindblom, the well-known Chicago Board of Trade man, was a guest speaker last Sunday evening at the meeting of "The Economic Conference". His subject was "Speculation and its bearing ...

    Swedish
    I H, II A 2, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 01, 1890
    A New National Bank

    Messrs. Haugan and Lindgren of this city have petitioned the Comptroller of Currency at Washington, D.C., to be granted the rights to organize a National bank in Chicago, to be known as the Northern National Bank of Chicago.

    Messrs. Haugan and Lindgren of this city have petitioned the Comptroller of Currency at Washington, D.C., to be granted the rights to organize a National bank in Chicago, to be ...

    Swedish
    II A 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 05, 1890
    A Seven-Story Hotel

    will be built on Chicago Avenue, near Townsend Street, by our countryman, Mr. O.H. Ahlgren.

    The construction costs are estimated at $50,000. and the plans have been drawn by Architect C.F. Sorenson.

    will be built on Chicago Avenue, near Townsend Street, by our countryman, Mr. O.H. Ahlgren. The construction costs are estimated at $50,000. and the plans have been drawn by Architect ...

    Swedish
    II F, II A 2, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 19, 1890
    An Ingenious Invention

    has been made by our countryman, William Noren, who resides at 3211 Portland Ave. The invention consists of a small contraption, which receives and registers the amounts of money put in the till. In a sense it is a regular cash register, but is superior to that because it is easier to manipulate and costs less. To illustrate the latter point, whereas the usual price of a cash register is from $100 to $150, Mr. Moren's device will sell at $50. He is securing a patent on the invention.

    has been made by our countryman, William Noren, who resides at 3211 Portland Ave. The invention consists of a small contraption, which receives and registers the amounts of money put ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, IV
  • Skandinaven -- December 06, 1890
    The Swedish Music Hall

    The Swedish Music Hall opened Saturday at 456 Thirty-first Street. There are one thousand seats. It is run on the European style, with tables and chairs where refreshment are served.

    The cost of the place is $60,000.

    The Swedish Music Hall opened Saturday at 456 Thirty-first Street. There are one thousand seats. It is run on the European style, with tables and chairs where refreshment are served. ...

    Swedish
    II A 2, II A 3 b
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 19, 1891
    Swedes in the Building Industry

    Among the building permits issued last week by the Building Department in City Hall, we note the following, granted to fellow countrymen:

    Nells Swanson, two-story dwelling at 48 Baxter St., $2,400
    John Johnson, one-story cottage at 1153 Southport Ave., 1,000
    J. Waline, three story dwlling at 3223 Portland Ave., 4,000
    Lothgren Bros., two-story dwelling at 6122 Carpenter St., 2,500
    Louisa Helstrom, two-story dwelling at 724 Logan St., 1,800
    Lars Olson, three story dwelling at 808 Washtenaw Ave., 4,000
    Alf Anderson, two-story dwelling at 6741 Peoria St., 1,800
    Mrs. A. Swenson, Two-story dwelling on Avenue K., near 97th St., 1,300
    Andrew Bloom, two-story dwelling at Winter and 60th Sts., 1,700
    V. Johnson, two-story dwelling at 1547 Otto St., 2,000
    John A. Jacobson, two-story dwellling at 46 Clifton St., 2,000
    F. A. Soderman, two-story dwelling at 6011 Elizabeth St., 2,000
    A. Backstrom, three-story dwelling at 146 Laughton St., 4,000
    Claus Nelson, two three-story dwellings at 836 and 838 W. Congress St., 12,000
    C. Anderson, two-story dwelling at 246 Baxter St., 1,500
    Henry Newgard, two-story dwelling at 582 N. Hoyne Ave., 4,000
    Martin Nelson, two-story dwelling at 147 Laughton St., 4,000
    Carl. S. Johanson, two-story dwelling and store on Davis St., 3,000
    2

    Translator's Note: Similar announcements are printed on Page 10 of every issue of this newspaper throughout the year. The following examples convey and idea of the activity of the Swedish people in Chicago's building industry during the year of 1891:

    March 12 issue cites 12 permits
    April 16 " " 8 "
    May 14 " " 23 "
    June 11 " " 14 "
    July 2 " " 15 "
    August 20 " " 9 "
    September 10 " " 7 "
    October 22 " " 10 "
    November 5 " " 9 "
    December 10 " " 5 "

    Among the building permits issued last week by the Building Department in City Hall, we note the following, granted to fellow countrymen: <table> <tr> <td>Nells Swanson, two-story dwelling at 48 ...

    Swedish
    II F, II A 2