The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 03, 1874
    Great Scandinavian Mass Meeting

    Those Scandinavians who belong to the opposition held a mass meeting yesterday.

    The assembly was called to order by Fritz Frantzen. The following persons were elected:

    President: A. B.Johnson, Vice Presidents: Geo. J. Hoffman, Capt. Ed. G. Lange, John Wickers; Secretary: John M. Arrvedson.

    We appointed on the committee of resolutions: Jacob Nielsen, Wm. Peterson, Capt. Bergquist.

    After General Lies had finished his speech, the committee on resolutions gave out the following report:

    As the present corrupt condition of our national politics requires the undivided attention of each good citizen, and as the Republican Party no longer defends 2the principles upon which it was founded, but has opened its doors to corruption, like other parties too long in power, and as the leaders of this party are unable to govern and have proven themselves unworthy of the confidence of the people, and since, to our way of thinking, a complete change of our national policy is imperative, as we are convinced, that the Scandinavian press does not express the views of the majority of the Scandinavian people: Be it resolved that the American citizens of Scandinavian descent approve completely the platform accepted by the opposition party on September 26:

    And be it further resolved that we oblige ourselves to work for the success of the opposition party at the next elections.

    After some further discussions the meeting was adjourned.

    Those Scandinavians who belong to the opposition held a mass meeting yesterday. The assembly was called to order by Fritz Frantzen. The following persons were elected: President: A. B.Johnson, Vice ...

    Swedish
    I F 3, I F 3, I F 3, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 18, 1879
    The Scandinavians

    Seventy Swedish citizens of the North Division held a meeting at Svea Hall, corner of Chicago Avenue and Larrabee Street, last evening and organized for the purpose of representation of their nationality in the city, town, and country governments. It is said there are from 16,000 to 18,000 Swedish residents on the North Side, and they cannot obtain the representation in the management of public affairs that their numbers entitle them to.

    S. A. Miller occupied the chair, and Rod Sylvan acted as Secretary.

    The proceedings were carried on in the Scandinavian tongue.

    At a previous meeting Messrs. Sundelius, Engstrom, Olson, Sylvan and Patterson were appointed a committee to draw up articles of organization, and they 2reported. The name adopted is the Swedish Political Club of North Chicago, and only Swedish citizens of the North Side and Lake View are entitled to membership in it. Some discussion took place over the matter of admitting those who were members of other political clubs, and an amendment to one of the articles was offered, which provided for the exclusion of any Swedes from the club who belonged to Republican, Democratic, Greenback, or any other party organizations, but it was voted down, and any Swedish voter living in the district indicated above was made eligible.

    The usual number of officers was provided in the articles for the government of the organization, and the report of the committee was finally adopted without alteration.

    The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President, F. T. Engstrom; First Vice-President, S.A.Miller, etc. etc......

    3

    A petition to the Judges of Cook County requesting nomination by them of S. A. Miller as a Justice of the Peace from the North Side, to represent the Swedish people, was read and approved........

    Seventy Swedish citizens of the North Division held a meeting at Svea Hall, corner of Chicago Avenue and Larrabee Street, last evening and organized for the purpose of representation of ...

    Swedish
    I F 3
  • Chicago Tribune -- October 30, 1879
    The Scandinavians

    A meeting was held in Justice Matson's office by several Scandinavian-American citizens for the purpose of considering the action taken by the Scandinavian press in striking the Republican nominees for Superior Court Clerk, Surveyor, and one Commissioner from the ticket and placing the Democratic nominees in in their place.

    After considerable discussion, it was decided to call a ratification mass-meeting Friday night at old Aurora Hall, on Milwaukee Avenue, near Ohio Street, for the purpose of ratifying the entire ticket nominated by the Republican Convention. Speeches were made by Messrs. I.K. Boyesen, R.C. Matson, S.T.Gunderson, Ammund Miller, Henry L. Bertz, Peter M. Balken, and others. The publisher of the Scandinaven, Mr. John Anderson, who was present, was called upon to explain the position the press had taken. He justified is on the ground of the neglect with which the Scandinavain-American citizens had been treated by the Republican Party.

    2

    While the sense of the meeting was, that the statement that the Scandinavians had been slighted was true, it was nevertheless decided that dissension at the present time was not justifiable, and that the Scandinavians should be called upon to ratify the Republican ticket as nominated in the last convention.

    A meeting was held in Justice Matson's office by several Scandinavian-American citizens for the purpose of considering the action taken by the Scandinavian press in striking the Republican nominees for ...

    Swedish
    I F 2, I F 2, I F 2, I F 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 02, 1891
    Anent Naturalization

    Arrangments have been made by the various Swedish-American Republican clubs in Chicago and Cook County to effect the naturalization of additional numbers of our countrymen next Monday evening, April 6th in the Court House, corner of Clark and Randolph Streets.

    The Committee on Naturalization once again calls our countrymen's attention to the importance of their becoming citizens and the many advantages gained thereby. Persons, who are not American citizens, cannot secure employment with the gigantic canal projects, now in progress, nor are they eligible for work on the World's Fair buildings or any other public construction. The State of Illinois prohibits non-citizens from ownership of property.

    2

    The so-called "first paper" may be obtained at any time after arrival in America. No witness is needed. A period of two years must have elapsed between this paper and the "second paper", at the time of procurement of which the applicant must bring with him one witness, who can verify to the applicant's residence in the country for five years. The fee for the "first paper" is fifty cents, but the second one is obtained free of charge.

    Arrangments have been made by the various Swedish-American Republican clubs in Chicago and Cook County to effect the naturalization of additional numbers of our countrymen next Monday evening, April 6th ...

    Swedish
    III A, I F 3
  • Skandinaven -- February 09, 1892
    Swedes in Chicago (Editorial)

    There are about 50,000 Swedes in Chicago. The first Swedes came to America in 1637, settled in the State of Delaware, and a few years later, a colony was organized in the State of Pennsylvania.

    Gustav Flack, the first Swede to arrive in Chicago, came here about 1843. In 1846 Mrs. Sara B. Larson arrived via the Prairie Schooner.

    The first church was started in 1849, by Rev. Gustav Svenomus; later, in 1853, Rev. Erland Carlson started the Immanuel Svensk-Lutherske Church.

    The oldest Swedish society is "Svea," organized in 1859. The Swedish glee club, the next largest society, was started many years later. Most of the Swedish 2immigrants were republicans.

    Many Swedish papers were started and most of them were fairly successful. Here are the most important: Svenska Amerikanaren. Svenska Tribunen, Gamla Ock Nya Hemlande, Svenska Curiren, plus a number of monthlys.

    There are about 50,000 Swedes in Chicago. The first Swedes came to America in 1637, settled in the State of Delaware, and a few years later, a colony was organized ...

    Swedish
    III A, II B 2 d 1, I F 3, III C, I C, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 01, 1892
    A Timely Reminder.

    The arrival last week at Chicago of the Norwegian steamer Wergeland naturally gave cause for festivities and other expressions of joy - all of which we deem very proper - although Wergeland is neither the first Norwegian sea-going vessel nor the first foreign steamer that has made its appearance in the harbor of Chicago. However, after these expressions of hilarity have waned and the glamor of festivity faded away to make room for the sordidness of everyday life, this welcome visit from afar should not be forgotten. This incident should, instead, serve as food for thought even with those, who rarely go to the trouble of using their reasoning faculties, and even with our honorable congressmen and the so-called "political leaders", who are enjoying the self-assumed authority to select "the people's" representatives in the Capitol at Washington.

    Unquestionably the arrival and visit here of the Norwegian merchant vessel Wergeland institutes a strong reminder of Chicago's need of a direct waterway connection with European harbors. It forcefully brings home the necessity of the doing away with the costly and time-wasting reloading procedures and the high freight rates on the railroads, which now form a part of waterway shipping from foreign parts. The present transportation arrangements of reloading at New York, followed by expensive freighting of goods of Scandinavian and other European origin intended for consumption in the States of the Middle West and the West, is ridiculous. Such a procedure adds to the cost of the goods to the consumer.

    2

    On the other hand consider that customs duties are the same, whether the goods are unloaded in New York or the importations go to Chicago direct.

    The very circumstance that the owners of Wergeland did not make any money on this trip is an undeniable proof of the fact that the canals linking the St. Lawrence River with the Great Lakes are not of sufficient depth. If they had been only a few feet deeper, the Wergeland would not have had to unload a part of her cargo at Montreal, in order to take on the same load again at Kingston. It goes without saying that the unloading and reloading processes, together with the rail freight charges between these two points, devoured all the profit that otherwise might have accrued.

    Adequate and sufficiently deep waterway connections between the Atlantic and the Great Lakes should be a goal, toward which all the representatives in Congress from the Western States should work unceasingly. They should be made to know that this is a matter of vital interest to the populations of the great West and Northwest, inasmuch as the lack of such a waterway increases the costs of many of the essentials of life and at the same time reduces the prices on their own products for shipment to Europe.

    We fully realize that the interests of the big railroad companies are diametrically opposed to those of the people, but our representatives in Congress should bear in mind that they are there primarily for the purpose of safeguarding 3the interests of the people. If they run the errands of the railroads, then they fail shamefully in their duties to their constituents. If they persistantly fail in their duties, new congressmen should be elected in their stead. In addition, the City Council of Chicago should, at each new session of Congress, petition the Federal Government at Washington concerning legislative measures for the inauguration of deepening the St. Lawrence - Great Lakes waterway as quickly as possible.

    Translator's Note: In the May 18 issue of the Svenska Tribunen there was a brief news item of following contents:

    "WATERWAY SHIPPING BETWEEN NORWAY AND CHICAGO. The steamer "Wergeland" at present is riding the waves somewhere on the Great Lakes on her journey from Tonsberg, Norway, direct to Chicago. She is carrying a cargo of 3000 pounds of salt fish and cod-liver oil."

    The arrival last week at Chicago of the Norwegian steamer Wergeland naturally gave cause for festivities and other expressions of joy - all of which we deem very proper - ...

    Swedish
    I F 3, I D 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 19, 1892
    Swedish Republican Mass Meeting.

    The mass meeting held last Thursday evening in Armory Hall, Battery D, was the largest and most successful meeting ever held by Swedish people in Chicago. More than 3000 people were present at this meeting, which was opened by Edward Westman, chairman of the Cook County Swedish-American Central Committee. In his opening address he pointed out that there are more than 12,000 legal voters among the Swedes in Chicago alone, and perhaps as many in the surrounding communities. He further stated that 14 new Swedish Republican Clubs had been organized in Chicago during the last few months in view of the pending general elections. The main speaker of the evening was Rev. Dr. C.A. Swensson from Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas. At first he spoke English, and later Swedish. He proved to be an orator of the first order and held his audience spell-bound from the beginning to the end. Clearly and in an interesting manner Rev. Swensson explained in details the principles of the Republican party in contrast to those of the Democratic party in the presidential campaign now being waged. But not only in national politics should the Swedes be Republicans, but also in state and local politics, where they have much to gain if they act in unison. Under a local Democratic regime the Swedes had been ignored and neglected! He concluded by reminding those present of the registrations to be held next Tuesday. Only those who register can vote.

    The mass meeting held last Thursday evening in Armory Hall, Battery D, was the largest and most successful meeting ever held by Swedish people in Chicago. More than 3000 people ...

    Swedish
    I F 2, I F 3, III B 1
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 05, 1901
    Adam's Ale

    p.6...Again scientific men, after examination, have declared that the water delivered to St. Louis through our drainage canal is absolutely free from contagion, or ingredients harmful to health. The same result has been given a number of times before. Can not the good St.Louisans quiet themselves and begin to drink "Adams's Ale" with the same security with which they consume Lemps or Anheuser Busch?

    p.6...Again scientific men, after examination, have declared that the water delivered to St. Louis through our drainage canal is absolutely free from contagion, or ingredients harmful to health. The same ...

    Swedish
    I F 3, I M
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 27, 1901
    The Republican Primary

    The Republican primary election will be held in the city next Friday, March 1. It is at the primary that it is necessary to have ones eyes open to see to it that the right delegates are chosen in the city convention and to support good candidates. Afterward it is too late to try to do anything.

    It cannot be inculcated enough that only the primary gives desirable men the opportunity to give their party their moral support. It is civic duty to select good candicates and this end cannot be entrusted to others, than delegates for the right, who can be depended upon. Each one should therefore help to nominate the right delegates to the convention. The winning or losing of the party depends on these means and judgments.

    The Republican primary election will be held in the city next Friday, March 1. It is at the primary that it is necessary to have ones eyes open to see ...

    Swedish
    I F 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 13, 1901
    A Change Is Necessary

    p.6. There is nothing creditable enough in the present mayor's career to recommend him for re-election. During the four years of his office life he has used the city of Chicago chiefly to further his personal interests as well as those of his friends.

    The police department is now nearly a subordinate political organization which protects law breakers and even omits collecting fines from this; the Democratic campaign fund usually gets its share from this "crime-preventive source" - such as it is. The city schools have never before been used for such evident political purposes and motives! In fact incompetency within various departments is so apparent that it openly shrieks with injustice. Innocent people have been made to suffer while rather doubtful characters have been left at large.

    In the public works only the loosest possible control has been practiced. The 2financial management has, in fact, made the city insolvent and now the administration agitates for more excessive debt placements through loans of obligation to refill the plundered treasuries.

    The inspection of coal deliveries to the city's buildings and institutions has been a scandalous affair. We could present column after column of intolerable corruption for which the present administration is responsible.

    The Democrats always reply with the charter question. It must cover a large portion of wrongs. Harrison's viewpoint on the charter, which was adopted because the public was so favorable to it, is considered his lone accomplishment. Hence when both parties are practically of the same opinion about the question; and the Republican program speaks out just as plainly as the Democratic, for short terms and just compensation for the city as conditions for the renewal of traction charters - then in the name of reason - there must be some regard for other public matters of 3of importance in the coming election.

    And if, as we hope, this should come about, the electorate should take into consideration the following election program which the Republican mayoralty candidate Judge Elbridge Hanecy speaks for and promises for the party: -

    (1) An honest, economical business-like administration.

    (2) The complete separation of the school system from any relation with party politics.

    (3) The management of towns and all taxing bodies should be consolidated into one central city administration.

    (4) The civil service system should be upheld and kept clean of favoritism and partiality.

    (5) Politics must not enter into the police department whose discipline must be sharpened above all.

    (6) Just and reasonable compensation shall be charged for all local concessions and privileges.

    4

    (7) The special assessment department means should be used only for known ends and overcharges punctually repaid to the taxpayer. No treaties with crime and vice.

    (8) The streets should be cleaned both materially and spiritually and kept safe all hours of the day.

    We put before the police these and other questions which the spring election will decide.

    p.6. There is nothing creditable enough in the present mayor's career to recommend him for re-election. During the four years of his office life he has used the city of ...

    Swedish
    I F 6, I F 3, I H