The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 02, 1891
    [Praise from Chicagoan]

    Chicagoan praises Sweden and Norway: A political meeting was held last Friday evening at the Scandia Hall to promote the candidacy of Elmer Washburn. One of the speakers was Melville E. Stone, who enjoys the reputation of being a highly educated and a widely travelled man. He has visited Sweden and Norway, and has nothing but praise for these Northern countries. In making comparisons between the social conditions in the capitals of these two countries and his own home town, Chicago, he admitted that he had no reason to glory in the fact of being a Chicagoan. In particular his comparisons applied to the different street-cleaning systems used in Chicago and in Stockholm, which latter city he referred to as "the Venice of Norway". From this remark, it appears that Mr. Stone, like the majority if Americans, possesses a very limited knowledge of goography.

    Chicagoan praises Sweden and Norway: A political meeting was held last Friday evening at the Scandia Hall to promote the candidacy of Elmer Washburn. One of the speakers was Melville ...

    Swedish
    I F 1, II B 2 g
  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 22, 1891
    [Elect Nelson and Boldenweck!]

    Our countryman, Gustavus L. Nelson has been nominated Republican candidate for member of the Cook County Board of Commissioners for the elections to be held next month.

    To aid in the election of Mr. Nelson and William Boldenweck, who is the Republican nominee for the office of Sanitary Trustee of the Drainage District, a meeting was called last Friday evening by the Linnaeus Club. The meeting was well attended and offered many points of great interest; among other things a lecture and a demonstration of the new voting law. The lecturer was Hon. Samuel E. Erickson, member of the Illinois State Legislature.

    It was pointed out that there are more than 25,000 naturalized Swedish voters in Chicago. For this reason, with all other reasons discounted, the Swedish people of Chicago should have a right to demand representation in the County's affairs. The chairman of the Club, W.S. Hussander, appealed to those present to cast their votes for Nelson, who enjoys a fine reputation and who will be a credit to the Swedish people. He also spoke with great warmth for the candidacy of Boldenweck, who has proved his ability and worthiness while holding the position of chief official of the Town of Lake View, prior to its incorporation with the City of Chicago.

    Cont.

    2

    In this connection we do well in mentioning that another countryman of ours is also running for office of Board member of Cook County Commissioners. His name is Peter W. Nilsson and he has been nominated by the Peoples Trade and Labor Party.

    Our countryman, Gustavus L. Nelson has been nominated Republican candidate for member of the Cook County Board of Commissioners for the elections to be held next month. To aid in ...

    Swedish
    I F 1, I F 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 23, 1892
    Swedish Candidates at the Forthcoming Election.

    Five Swedish men are candidates on the Republican ticket at the election to be held April 5, namely:

    John Larson, for Alderman from the 23rd Ward;

    Edward Peterson for Alderman from the 30th ward;

    Andrew Ringman, for Town Clerk of Hyde Park;

    John Thoren, for Town Clerk of West Town;

    C.P. Youngquist for Supervisor of Jefferson.

    In this connection we wish to mention that nine of our fellow countrymen are employed in the various departments of Sheriff Gilbert's office. During the regime of his predecessor, Sheriff Mattson, who was a Norwegian, there was only one Swede employed in that branch of our County Administration.

    Five Swedish men are candidates on the Republican ticket at the election to be held April 5, namely: John Larson, for Alderman from the 23rd Ward; Edward Peterson for Alderman ...

    Swedish
    I F 1
  • Chicago Tribune -- September 02, 1892
    (No headline)

    There is no more important element of the Republican Party in Cook County than the Swedish-American voters. They can poll 10,000 votes this fall. Additions are being made to their number every week. Before every election for the last three years the names of from 500 to 1,000 Swedish-American voters have been added to the registry lists of this city.

    The new and the old citizens of Swedish birth and blood have always been loyal to the Republican Party. They have never wavered. They have been sometimes treated shabbily in the party conventions, but that treatment did not weaken their allegiance to the party, and its principles. They have deserved well of the party and the party leaders. This fall they ask that one of their representatives shall be nominated for some important county office.

    They present two men, Mr. Erickson, a young man who has done splendid work in promoting the naturalization of his countrymen, and Mr. Nelson, who has served in the County Board most acceptably. The nomination of either for a country office will 2be acceptable to the Swedish American voters. They do not care to accept anything less. Their requests are modest. Their representations are modestly presented. The Republican leaders ought to use their influence to the end that they shall be favorably considered and acted on.

    It will be the height of folly to ignore the claims of this element. To grant their request will inspire them with enthusiasm for the ticket. It will give a wholesome stimulus to the naturalization movement amongst the Swedish, and will add from 1,000 to 1,500 good Republican names to the registry list of voters in the county. If the Republican leaders, in order to carry out some bargain to some chronic officeholder, or to "fix" a slate geographically for the benefit of bummers, or to "round out" a combine of spoilsmen, fail to satisfy the fair and just demands of the Swedish-American voters in Cook County this fall, they will invite and deserve defeat.

    3

    The Republican leaders are enough, if they are brave and honest enough, to ignore the demands of the chronic office holders, and of the greedy, mangy curs who pack Republican conventions, and make deals and trades, and try to boss the party. The eight prominent gentlemen who have been selected as the representatives of the different sections of the party have the power, if they have the will, to present a ticket to the voters of Cook County which can win this fall. Having undertaken the task, they will be held to a strict accountability if they fail. And their most important duty will be to name a Swedish-American for some place on the county ticket. That will lead necessarily to other nominations which ought to be satisfactory.

    There is no more important element of the Republican Party in Cook County than the Swedish-American voters. They can poll 10,000 votes this fall. Additions are being made to their ...

    Swedish
    I F 1, I F 4
  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 01, 1893
    Frederick Lundin.

    Frederick Lundin, our prominent countryman in Moreland and the Republican candidate for alderman for the 26th Ward, is a young industrious business man, respected and honored for his honest and his sincere manners. Moreland should be proud if it could be represented in the City Council by such a man as Lundin.

    He came from Sweden to this country with his parents when he was a child. He began his early life as an errand boy and is now a useful business man. Lundin rejected the candidacy for a long time but finally consented to accept it, when he was told that Moreland ought to be represented by a man who both would and could make his voice heard in the Council.

    Lundin's rival is a grocery merchant, T. Soyle, who said last spring at a meeting at the Sherman House, among other things, "Let us lay the Swedes beneath the table."

    2

    We Swedes will answer by placing our countryman, Lundin, at the table and Soyle beneath it.

    Frederick Lundin, our prominent countryman in Moreland and the Republican candidate for alderman for the 26th Ward, is a young industrious business man, respected and honored for his honest and ...

    Swedish
    I F 1, IV, I C
  • Svenska Nyheter -- April 05, 1904
    Do Not Forget to Vote (Editorial)

    The aldermanic election takes place today, Tuesday, April 5. We hope that none of the Swedes who have the right to vote will fail to use this right. The election places are open from six o'clock in the morning till four o'clock in the afternoon. The citizens would do well to vote "yes" to all the questions appearing on the small ballot.

    Do not forget to vote!

    The aldermanic election takes place today, Tuesday, April 5. We hope that none of the Swedes who have the right to vote will fail to use this right. The election ...

    Swedish
    I F 1, III A, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- October 09, 1906
    The Status of the Swede in Politics by Carl Smalandson

    The retiring or reticent trait of the Swede is periodical, noticeable from time to time in scattered parts of the country. At the last primary election the Swedes have in many locations attracted much attention by beating their opponents, regardless of what their nationality might have been. By these victories they have demonstrated that they can co-operate and win their objectives. However, most of the time the vote of the Swede is looked upon as and practically proven to be an article of transferable or purchasable merchandise. Where substantial state organizations of Swedish partisans have worked hard and in unity, they have succeeded in drawing the attention of the big party leaders and, in return for a sizable bloc of votes, they have secured appointments and even elections for many of their countrymen. In addition to offices won they have gained a surprising amount of respect from all nationalities in their colony.

    2

    Regarding the holding of offices by Swedes, there are comparatively few and not enough for excitement. Here and there the high officials show their appreciation of Swedish votes by appointing a Swede to a fair position, though not a high one. For example, the governor of Massachusetts appointed a Swede as chairman of the Board of Registration in Pharmacy. Ordinarily an Irish politician, who can barely sign his own name, has a very decisive preference, no matter how well educated and trained by experience a Swede might be.

    In politics the average Swedish-American shows two sides or views. Mixing with his countrymen he is very important, preaching the doctrines of his favorite party eloquently creating the impression that he is considered an able man in political circles. He is more humble when it comes to demanding an appointment, though he creates the impression that he holds a worth-while bloc of Swedish votes. His greatest humility comes to the surface when it is a question of raising funds for a club or a publication.

    In the case of many of our Swedish politicians, the greatest honor granted them is a written invitation to a rally to tell the crowd how they can count on the 3Swedish vote. Such rallies are held, as a rule, in quarters over a saloon making it convenient to have plenty of free beer on tap as bait.

    This fall, the Swedes have more candidates than ever before for governors, congressmen, and other inferior offices. It is now a question of whether they stick together and elect their candidates and prove what influence Swedish support of other candidates may accomplish. Naturally the Swedes must stick together. Their influence, even concerning national politics is growing even though much depends upon the second generation.

    The retiring or reticent trait of the Swede is periodical, noticeable from time to time in scattered parts of the country. At the last primary election the Swedes have in ...

    Swedish
    I F 1, I F 4
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- October 30, 1906
    The People and Their Judges (Editorial)

    "The People and Their Judges" is the main subject of daily discussions throughout Chicago and in all colonies of the foreign born at the present time.

    When a person's life is at stake or when he is in danger of losing his property because of an unreliable judge or jury, the latter's party preference should make no difference nor should the exposed man's party affiliation have any bearing on the decision of judge or jury. In other words, partisanship should be ignored and justice, pure and simple, should rule.

    In all elections we have voted for the candidate that we thought was the most impartial and just. The progress of our enterprises depends on the administration of such justice and on our confidence in the judicial honesty of the men we have elected.

    2

    In reference to the judicial branch of our Chicago government, we would have our readers think over and answer the following questions:

    Are trusts, corporations, and party bosses making a last stand effort to dictate the nominations and election of judicial and other candidates in their own interests?

    Or, are their efforts put forth to make it impossible for the people to elect trustworthy judges, thereby getting justice, instead of partisan selfishness and unfairness?

    Have you ever had a friend (a trust, corporation or party boss), who made inquiry into the political life of the candidate, when he knew the candidate was a little friendly to his trust, corporation or party boss.

    Have you noticed that corporation councils are all Republican in Republican districts and Democratic in Democratic districts. Also, have you noticed that they who enjoy special privileges try so hard to elect judges who grant them?

    3

    Is it not advisable for us to ignore party politics and vote for the candidate, who, we are convinced, is a man of dependable honesty dispensing justice to all, regardless of his party affiliation?

    Why should not we, the citizens, take the judiciary out of politics and elect men of real character and ability.

    Is it not more important to the average citizen to elect a judge they known is honest and just than to elect one because of his political or church status?

    In another column of this issue we present a list of candidates from our Swedish colony. Those mentioned in this article, we heartily recommend as men of unlimited ability and of an unassailable record. We shall look forward to a strong vote in their favor throughout our colony.

    "The People and Their Judges" is the main subject of daily discussions throughout Chicago and in all colonies of the foreign born at the present time. When a person's life ...

    Swedish
    I F 1, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- November 13, 1906
    Prominent Swedish-American Trade-Unionist

    Frequent notices in the local Swedish-American press call our attention to the important role played by Swedes in American trade-union circles, and today we take great pleasure in presenting a man who is held in high esteem by his colleagues, and who has even been honored with political recognition. He was a candidate for State's representative from his district on the Socialist ticket, and even though he was defeated pulled no less than 6,458 votes.

    G. E. Strom was born in Falun, Dalecarlia, on December 8, 1863, in which city he also received his public school education. He came to America in 1879. By trade he is a cement finisher, but for the last four years he has been business agent for the Cement Workers' Union. His experiences as a representative of the workers have led Mr. Strom to the conclusion that it is sheer folly for the latter to go on strike on an empty stomach, since in that case the employers have all the advantages. He thinks that the workers' 2best weapon is the ballot, for which also the capitalists have a healthy respect, and he is looking forward to the time when workers will vote workers into the legislature and the senate; then, in Mr. Strom's opinion, the situation will be reversed, and the capitalists will have to send delegates to the workers, instead of as is now the case, the workers asking their employers for a hearing.

    Also in other districts labor's Swedish-American candidates have made a good showing, according to incoming reports, even though the number of votes cast for them were not sufficient to bring about their election. It is, however, becoming more and more apparent that Swedish voters are inclined to give their votes to Swedish candidates.

    Frequent notices in the local Swedish-American press call our attention to the important role played by Swedes in American trade-union circles, and today we take great pleasure in presenting a ...

    Swedish
    I F 5, I D 2 a 3, I D 2 a 4, I F 1, IV
  • Svenska Amerikanaren -- February 19, 1907
    Political Talk

    Preparations are being mady by both political parties in Chicago for the coming election in April regarding the first five years term as a mayor. To ask Republicans and Democrats to consider carefully the problem is only natural. But the "five year mayor" is not the only question of the one of first interest. There are other matters of interest that concern the whole political situation. If we are now to have complete municipal ownership of the city's railway system it would seem that the present mayor would be as good as elected because he has to a great extent prepared the ground for this work.

    But the thinker has and will to a great extent question whether he has managed the affairs as he should have done.

    Both Democrats and Republicans are of the opinion that he has held up the finishing of affairs so as to make the City Railway question into a campaign argument for his own good. The question is so confusing that "experts interested in the situation cannot explain.

    2

    One fact stands out in Mayor Dunne's favor that in questions pertaining to the city and community interests Mayor Dunne has stood on the Corporations' side. Thus it was the fault of Dunne when the city alderman gave away 14 million dollars to the gas company, who have plundered the city and the consumers on gas with unheard of high prices for many years. When the aldermen finished studying the gas rates and wanted the price reduced 75c per thousand cubic feet, Dunne protested and waged a battle that cost the city dearly. And in many other questions Dunne has favored the corporations' side.

    But on the other hand he has been the Catholic priests best worker. In one way he has been a play ball in the Catholic hands. When his work as mayor is finished, when it is seen what he has done and what he should have done, then he will have to admit he was not the best. Dunne is an opponent of Carter H. Harrison who has served four terms and has a vast number of friends and followers. It is quite possible that he will receive the nomination. But that only effects the Democratic party. However many Dunnites will never be Harrisonites. The trouble Harrison will find is that he is not a Republican. He has a large number of best friends who are 3Republicans and if he receives the nomination he will receive many votes from the Republican side. But at the same time he will lose many of the Democratic votes. On the other side the Republican party has pretty well decided that Fred Busse will be their candidate.

    Preparations are being mady by both political parties in Chicago for the coming election in April regarding the first five years term as a mayor. To ask Republicans and Democrats ...

    Swedish
    I F 3, I F 1