The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 02, 1890
    [The Death Toll Continues]

    The Death Toll in Chicago through Railway crossing accidents was unusually large during the year of 1889. Not less than Two-hundred fifty persons lost their lives in this manner - fifty more than during the previous year. In one day alone, on Tuesday of last week, seven people were killed at railroad crossings, four within the City limits and three, the Revell family, in Wilmette. All these murders, for they can hardly be called anything else, must primarily be laid at the doorsteps of the railroads and secondarily upon the city administration

    It is expressly provided for in the City's ordinances that the railway companies must install, or cause to have installed, safety gates at all crossings and provide a watchman at all such places. They are further required to provide all other pre-cautionary measures for the safe guarding of lives for all, who in their daily 2pursuits have to cross the tracks. But these laws have been and still remain a dead letter on the statute books and the railroads no doubt will be permitted to add victim after victim to their list and without fear of punishment to increase the already horribly large number of deaths because of negligence and indifference on their part.

    The Death Toll in Chicago through Railway crossing accidents was unusually large during the year of 1889. Not less than Two-hundred fifty persons lost their lives in this manner - ...

    Swedish
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  • Svenska Tribunen -- April 06, 1892
    American Journalistic "Knownothingism"

    As an example of the general inaccuracy of the statements made by, and the information contained in, the American newspapers, we are quoting excerpts from an article published in a recent issue of "The Financier", a journal of finance and commerce.

    This paper says that the first savings banks in Europe were those instituted in Belgium in 1869. This paper goes on to say that savings banks came into existence in France in 1883, in Hungary in 1886, in Italy in 1875, and in Sweden only ten years ago. But that is not all. It makes the further claim that Europe has imitated the American system of savings banks.

    Now, if the writer, who prepared this ill-smelling concoction for the glorification of our big American financiers, had gone to the trouble of consulting an encyclopedia, he would have found that savings banks were proposed and suggested in Europe by the great Daniel Defoe as early as 1697. He also would have found that such banks were founded in great numbers in several of the European countries during the latter half of the eighteenth century; and, as far as Sweden is concerned, the first savings bank in that country was founded over seventy years ago, inasmuch as the first Swedish bank of that type was founded in the City of Gothenburg in the year 1820.

    As an example of the general inaccuracy of the statements made by, and the information contained in, the American newspapers, we are quoting excerpts from an article published in a ...

    Swedish
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  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 01, 1892
    A Timely Reminder.

    The arrival last week at Chicago of the Norwegian steamer Wergeland naturally gave cause for festivities and other expressions of joy - all of which we deem very proper - although Wergeland is neither the first Norwegian sea-going vessel nor the first foreign steamer that has made its appearance in the harbor of Chicago. However, after these expressions of hilarity have waned and the glamor of festivity faded away to make room for the sordidness of everyday life, this welcome visit from afar should not be forgotten. This incident should, instead, serve as food for thought even with those, who rarely go to the trouble of using their reasoning faculties, and even with our honorable congressmen and the so-called "political leaders", who are enjoying the self-assumed authority to select "the people's" representatives in the Capitol at Washington.

    Unquestionably the arrival and visit here of the Norwegian merchant vessel Wergeland institutes a strong reminder of Chicago's need of a direct waterway connection with European harbors. It forcefully brings home the necessity of the doing away with the costly and time-wasting reloading procedures and the high freight rates on the railroads, which now form a part of waterway shipping from foreign parts. The present transportation arrangements of reloading at New York, followed by expensive freighting of goods of Scandinavian and other European origin intended for consumption in the States of the Middle West and the West, is ridiculous. Such a procedure adds to the cost of the goods to the consumer.

    2

    On the other hand consider that customs duties are the same, whether the goods are unloaded in New York or the importations go to Chicago direct.

    The very circumstance that the owners of Wergeland did not make any money on this trip is an undeniable proof of the fact that the canals linking the St. Lawrence River with the Great Lakes are not of sufficient depth. If they had been only a few feet deeper, the Wergeland would not have had to unload a part of her cargo at Montreal, in order to take on the same load again at Kingston. It goes without saying that the unloading and reloading processes, together with the rail freight charges between these two points, devoured all the profit that otherwise might have accrued.

    Adequate and sufficiently deep waterway connections between the Atlantic and the Great Lakes should be a goal, toward which all the representatives in Congress from the Western States should work unceasingly. They should be made to know that this is a matter of vital interest to the populations of the great West and Northwest, inasmuch as the lack of such a waterway increases the costs of many of the essentials of life and at the same time reduces the prices on their own products for shipment to Europe.

    We fully realize that the interests of the big railroad companies are diametrically opposed to those of the people, but our representatives in Congress should bear in mind that they are there primarily for the purpose of safeguarding 3the interests of the people. If they run the errands of the railroads, then they fail shamefully in their duties to their constituents. If they persistantly fail in their duties, new congressmen should be elected in their stead. In addition, the City Council of Chicago should, at each new session of Congress, petition the Federal Government at Washington concerning legislative measures for the inauguration of deepening the St. Lawrence - Great Lakes waterway as quickly as possible.

    Translator's Note: In the May 18 issue of the Svenska Tribunen there was a brief news item of following contents:

    "WATERWAY SHIPPING BETWEEN NORWAY AND CHICAGO. The steamer "Wergeland" at present is riding the waves somewhere on the Great Lakes on her journey from Tonsberg, Norway, direct to Chicago. She is carrying a cargo of 3000 pounds of salt fish and cod-liver oil."

    The arrival last week at Chicago of the Norwegian steamer Wergeland naturally gave cause for festivities and other expressions of joy - all of which we deem very proper - ...

    Swedish
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  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 27, 1901
    Industrial Combines

    p.6... The matter of "Industrial Combines" is difficult to make decisions upon because it involves the question of individual rights. Both labor and capital seek to combine in ever larger unions. Who is a prophet? Who can say where we are going?

    p.6... The matter of "Industrial Combines" is difficult to make decisions upon because it involves the question of individual rights. Both labor and capital seek to combine in ever larger ...

    Swedish
    I D 1 a, I D 2 a 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 08, 1901
    Dr. Carl Swensson on Labor and Trusts (Editorial)

    p.6. From Pittsburg comes the news that measures and steps are being taken to call a national convention of workers and workers' organizations representing the Iron and Glass industries in Chicago about the first of July. The objective will be to bring about a strongly united organization of two million workers to oppose the trusts, because they do not favor labor and since capital has organized itself, no sensible person can blame the workers for doing likewise. One cannot help but realize that the rich have carried this action on the part of labor through the Trust Movement. In fact anyone can perceive it.

    The under-signed is opposed to Trusts of all kinds among rich and poor; in the state and the church. I am a child of Reformation, a free American citizen and believe in individual freedom to the very greatest degree possible. Recognition 2of the individual and individual rights is one of the great principles of the Reformation or Protestantism. The same is true of our early American forefathers.

    But where are we going now. -

    A Steel Trust of a million dollars! The object of it was said to be to produce more cheaply. However, as soon as the Trust was established, steel rails increased in price two dollars per ton. Yes it is pleasant to think that another fifty million dollar Trust is now being established which will at least be an aggravating thorn acting as a billion dollar inducement next.

    President Schwab tell us that a cultured person is not so through self determination. Hurah! for Schwab! Yes, Schwab says that a cultured person, who for example, has taken student examinations cannot or would not strive with all his soul to only earn money. Hear ye the words? The greatest objective in the twentieth century is to earn money by the millions. Is it a dream or is it a reality?

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    Now there will be a workers' trust. Who has not awaited it? I was about to say, who does not wish its success under the circumstances? In a billion dollar enterprise the worker becomes a number only. Why, then, not combine the numbers? Why not count them like money? Yes! that is the thing to do now. Force will meet force. The Money Princes have carried those of small means to be ruined. The Workers' Princes try to force Workers to become their spineless tools in and for the winning of a planned victory against capital. Who does not perceive it, and deplore it, but the longer both are left at large, so much more difficult will it be to remain as one people

    If the giant organization becomes a reality among the workers, they will probably be able to force the Trusts. But only if they present a united front long enough, and are not too low in their demands. On the other hand increased wages are not taken out of the pockets of the Trusts. The consumer pays of that.

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    As to how this situation will be met no one can fortell. The whole matter is an affair that as yet lacks vigor and direction. However, let us consider American people have an usual amount of "common-sense," when confronted with serious social questions and problems.

    p.6. From Pittsburg comes the news that measures and steps are being taken to call a national convention of workers and workers' organizations representing the Iron and Glass industries in ...

    Swedish
    I D 1 a, I D 2 a 3, I J
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 15, 1901
    The Great Schwab.

    p.6....The great Schwab has spoken. He is against workers' organizations, since they limit the individual worker's freedom "hast du mir gesehen" -Schwab-interested in the individual worker! But why does not the billion trust manager say a single word about the fact that his other trusts are against the man with little capital? Why does he not Mention with even a whisper the danger - the one; namely, that the individual may come to lose all meaning as an individual and competitor. No, Schwab is silent about that.

    p.6....The great Schwab has spoken. He is against workers' organizations, since they limit the individual worker's freedom "hast du mir gesehen" -Schwab-interested in the individual worker! But why does not ...

    Swedish
    I D 1 a, I D 2 a 3
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 22, 1901
    Texas Oil Speculation (Editorial)

    p.6..........It is a known fact that petroleum has really been found in Northeastern Texas, and the discovery will certainly be in time, an enrichment for the state as well as for the individuals or companies, who give time, trouble, and money to this useful pursuit.

    But even another class of people have understood how to "earn money," on the discovery, and of these the great public should beware. This class is made up of so-called "promoters," who, through buying or in some other way have secured for themselves a few acres of land, under which it is claimed that great reserves of petroleum are to be found. The exploitation of this wealth they are not selfish enough to reserve for themselves, but will permit a larger or smaller circle of their fellow-men to share in it through the "purchase" of shares in the enterprises.

    Among these "companies" a number appear already to have done a shining business, 2through the sale of stocks, even before they have begun to drill for the supposed oil. Others have made trial-drills without finding oil but by the sale of a few hundred thousand shares "at ten cents on the dollar" of the market par-value,the Messrs promoters have just as fully reached their goal. Ten cents for a share, which "among brothers are worth a dollar," appears surely to be a pretty low price, but to be able to sell shares it is necessary to offer them cheaply, and 100,000 shares at ten cents each cost, of course, little more but bring in exactly as much as 10,000 shares at one-hundred cents each. Many among those who buy such shares know themselves, that no oil will be found but hope that in time they will be able to resell the shares bought all these help, therefore, to swell businesses, and all appear to be satisfied and happy - except the lost owners of the shares, who, after they have found there expectations mocked feel themselves just as much lost as the market-players in New York, who at the recent catastrophe there had the misfortune of finding themselves on the wrong side.

    Our intention is, in the meantime, not to dissuade from all buying of shares in Texas oil firms, when, of course, sometimes such firms may be founded on good suppositions, and only need capital to become profitable. But none should, according 3to our viewpoint, lay down his money in such enterprises before he himself has, with the aid of really versed persons carefully tested their standing and their prospects for success. The exportation for the utmost caution in this matter is necessary, since the every day experience shows that the great majority, all too easily, allow themselves to be fooled by the prospect of extraordinary profits, when, in addition, from the world-city, Chicago, thousands of dollars stream to an "underhanded prophet's" treasury-chest, it is no wonder the more honest and trusting citizens in the country permit themselves to be fooled by such promises, which are given them by the Messrs. promoters - often as the only reward for their money.

    p.6..........It is a known fact that petroleum has really been found in Northeastern Texas, and the discovery will certainly be in time, an enrichment for the state as well as ...

    Swedish
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  • Svenska Tribunen -- September 11, 1901
    Theodore Roosevelt (Editorial)

    If we correctly interpret President Roosevelt's speech at the Minnesota State Fair, he intends to handle the Trust problem, as if it were a valuable, but dangerous Bull, which should be taken with a lasso, be furnished with a nose and tethered, so as not to harm the people.

    If we correctly interpret President Roosevelt's speech at the Minnesota State Fair, he intends to handle the Trust problem, as if it were a valuable, but dangerous Bull, which should ...

    Swedish
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  • Svenska Tribunen -- November 27, 1901
    Mr. Anderson's Donations

    Our countryman P. H. Anderson has made several donations for religious and charitable purposes. In connection with them, we wish to clarify many erroneous rumors regarding their disposition. Of Mr. Anderson's donations $10,000 goes to the treasury of the Mission Church; $5,000 to a Children's Home in Alaska; $25,000 to North Park College; $5,000 to needy students attending North Park College; $25,000 are on deposit in the State Bank of Chicago, as a nucleus for the founding of a hospital. Anderson has also given $1,000 to the China-Alaska Mission.

    Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have sailed aboard the "Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse" for a trip to Sweden and other parts of Europe. The Andersons intend to remain in Stockholm through the winter. Mrs. Anderson's mother lives in Gothenburg.

    Our countryman P. H. Anderson has made several donations for religious and charitable purposes. In connection with them, we wish to clarify many erroneous rumors regarding their disposition. Of Mr. ...

    Swedish
    IV, I A 1 d, I D 1 a, II D 3, III C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- December 04, 1901
    Uniform Railway Regulations (Editorial)

    It may be that a mistake of a forgivable nature caused the accident on the Wabash Railway at Seneca, Michigan.

    Two trains were traveling on the same track, directed only by telegrams. It seems that the wording in these telegrams were not correctly construed by the train dispatchers. This was most unfortunate, because the inevitable consequence was that the two trains collided with one another head-on. The weather was clear, the head-lights of the locomotives could be seen for a distance of five miles in either direction.

    The only way in which such accidents can be entirely stopped is for the individual States and the United States government to formulate laws for 2the railroads, making it absolutely compulsory to double track their road-bed, particularly for express and through service; also to install the automatic blocks system.

    The Interstate Commerce Commission should be charged with the supervision and enforcement of the laws. It would seem to us then that no further accident of this nature would be possible. Nothing can excuse the State of Michigan for its laxity in regard to railroad safety control.

    The traveling public is certainly entitled to the utmost safety as they travel over our various railroads.

    It may be that a mistake of a forgivable nature caused the accident on the Wabash Railway at Seneca, Michigan. Two trains were traveling on the same track, directed only ...

    Swedish
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