The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svenska Tribunen -- March 10, 1880
    Swedish Amateur Society.

    The Swedish Amateur Society, Chicago was invited to appear at Timms Hall in Moline, Ill. with the comedy "Rockus Pumpernickel" Sunday, February 29th. The theater was packed to the doors and all the tickets were sold out in advance. The public greeted the artists with roaring applause.

    A representative of the Swedish Tribune who was present, noticed that many prominent and respected members of different religious bodies had cast away the fear of damnation and in brotherly union with the so called "children of the world" attended the spectacle in the temple of Thalia to lay an offering on its altar from a sincere heart.

    The Nordenskiold Society was the host of the occasion, inviting the artists of the play for supper after the spectacle.

    The Swedish Amateur Society, Chicago was invited to appear at Timms Hall in Moline, Ill. with the comedy "Rockus Pumpernickel" Sunday, February 29th. The theater was packed to the doors ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 1, I B 4
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 15, 1893
    Swedish Service.

    Swedish service was conducted last Sunday at 4 P.M. in Trinity Chapel at Michigan Avenue and 26th Street in the presence of 150 persons.

    After the service, which was conducted by the Rev. A.F.Schultzberg, the Rev. Herman Lindskog, Rector of St. Ausgarius Swedish Episcopal Church on the north side, spoke and said that these services in Trinity Chapel are conducted for the benefit of those Swedes living on the south side of Chicago and who like to worship God as their forefathers did.

    Fifteen persons remained after the service and declared their willingness to participate in future parish work. The leader of the new congregation will be the Rev. Schultzberg and he will conduct services every Sunday at 4 P.M. regularly and also Thursdays at 7:30 P.M.

    Swedish service was conducted last Sunday at 4 P.M. in Trinity Chapel at Michigan Avenue and 26th Street in the presence of 150 persons. After the service, which was conducted ...

    Swedish
    III C, III H, I B 4
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 17, 1893
    Theological Examination

    Fourteen Swedish theological students took their examination last Thursday at the Swedish section of the theological faculty at the University of Chicago. The instruction there is held in the Swedish language and so is the examination.

    Professor C. G. Lagergren made the farewell address to the students, which was answered by C. F. Wiking, from Evanston, chosen by the class for this purpose. This examination was the first one since the amount of time required for study was changed from three to four years. Two of the graduated: C. W. Swndmarkoch, and Carl Anderson are going to stay in the city; two go as missionaries to China, and the ten remaining will go to different states.

    They will all receive their diplomas Midsummer Eve. Witnesses to the examination were Reverend Charles Palm, from Evanston; P. A. Hjelm, Chicago; O Hedeen, Brooklyn, and C. A. Sandvall, Minneapolis.

    Fourteen Swedish theological students took their examination last Thursday at the Swedish section of the theological faculty at the University of Chicago. The instruction there is held in the Swedish ...

    Swedish
    I A 2 a, I B 4, III C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 28, 1899
    Swedish Midsummerfeast

    We have again celebrated Midsummer here and we have once more gone back in our thoughts to old Sweden, with its clear blue skies, under which young and old danced around the Maypole. We Chicago Swedes have faithfully preserved the customs of our forefathers, even if Midsummer sun is shining over us thousands of miles from the land of the Midsummer sun.

    The Swedish Central Society had invited our countrymen to Columbus Park last Sunday to celebrate Midsummer in the old Swedish fashion, and at the same time to think of our aged people, for whom it is the intention of the Society to erect a Home. About 10,000 people responded to the invitation and enjoyed the outing very much. The program consisted of plays, races,and a historical pageant and dancing, of course. Several Swedish singing societies sang Swedish folksongs. Doctor J.A.Enarder delivered the festival address....

    We have again celebrated Midsummer here and we have once more gone back in our thoughts to old Sweden, with its clear blue skies, under which young and old danced ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 3, I B 4, II D 5
  • Svenska Tribunen -- January 29, 1902
    [Altar Society Is Busy Now]

    The Altar Society of St. Ansgarius Swedish Episcopal Church is decorating the altar every Sunday with flowers, which later on are distributed to the sick after the church services are over.

    The Altar Society of St. Ansgarius Swedish Episcopal Church is decorating the altar every Sunday with flowers, which later on are distributed to the sick after the church services are ...

    Swedish
    III C, I B 4
  • Svenska Tribunen -- October 01, 1902
    [Fiftieth Anniversary]

    The Swedish Baptists in America celebrated this week their Fiftieth Jubilee with an elaborate church festival at the American Baptist Church on Michigan Avenue. The festival was attended by many delegates representing Swedish Baptist congregations not only from this country, but from Sweden, Norway, and Finland. Many speeches were made concerning the denominational work here in America. A solemn church service concluded the jubilee. The Swedish Baptist denomination in America was founded by Reverend Gustaf Palmquist of Rock Island, Ill. on Sept. 13, 1852. There are now 16 conferences, 318 congregations, 293 ministers, 245 churches and 21,767 members.

    The Swedish Baptists in America celebrated this week their Fiftieth Jubilee with an elaborate church festival at the American Baptist Church on Michigan Avenue. The festival was attended by many ...

    Swedish
    III C, I B 4
  • Svenska Nyheter -- July 02, 1903
    Leo XIII

    Few persons have been in charge of the pontificate so long as the recently deceased Pope Leo XIII. For more than twenty-five years he has been pope, during a period when mighty currents of thought manifested themselves, and one memorable page after another became printed in the book of history.

    Naturally the late pope has been blamed for much, but taking an impartial point of view one is forced to admit that in his method of directing the activities of the papacy he has come to deserve consideration as one of the greatest occupants of the chair of St. Peter. We are no devotees of the pope or of the Catholic Church, yet we feel obliged to express our admiration for a man who has shown himself in every way to 2be a person of great intelligence, more learned than most of his contemporaries....and broad enough in his views to embrace all humanity and everything that tends to improve human life. As a statesman he could stand comparison with the best....

    Leo XIII has concluded life...History will pass judgment on his acts.

    Few persons have been in charge of the pontificate so long as the recently deceased Pope Leo XIII. For more than twenty-five years he has been pope, during a period ...

    Swedish
    I B 4
  • Svenska Nyheter -- February 23, 1904
    Is Poverty a Result of Laziness (Editorial)

    Hard times and soup kitchens are with us again. Each day during the past few months has brought us news of closed factories and reduced wages for the workers. In spite of the stubborn insistence in some quarters that good times are still with us, the misery of hard times and soup kitchens are closing in about us. This sinister fact cannot be hidden, not even by those papers which so willingly close their eyes to the depressing facts of our social life.

    Our daily papers are beginning to publish stories of the situation, quite akin to the tales from ancient Rome. The hungry masses are crying for bread, and the politicians are competing in their show of benevolence. Just to give an example:

    Alderman Michael Mullen of Ward Eight last Wednesday morning established 2a free soup kitchen at 435 East Front Street. Immediately the place was crowded with a throng of hungry people who, however, soon went away carrying baskets with bread and cans filled with coffee and soup.

    The condition of the unemployed has become so alarming and the number of petty thieves so large that the machinery of law, usually so hardhearted when the question of punishment for petty offenders is concerned, has stalled. In our police courts we have witnessed such remarkable incidents as to hear policemen ask lenience from the courts for the accused who stole to satisfy his hunger.

    Here is a scene at court: A man accused of having stolen a loaf of bread is before the judge. The arresting policeman is the chief witness. But what do we hear? The policeman forgets that he is the accuser.....This is what he says: "Your Honor, in the rooms below, there are in the neighborhood of two hundred people who are starving. This man, Jones, is a worker, not a thief. He was to divide what he stole with the others. I arrested him to prevent him from committing some worse offense such as 3robbery. For the same reason I also arrested his associates in stealing. About 3 A.M. they are accustomed to go out to get hold of something edible. A side of pork was taken last Monday, and the butcher told me not to hunt for it. "God knows that they needed it," he said. In a number of the rooming houses there are people who neither have a cent, or anything to eat."

    And how did the judge answer the policeman's appeal for mercy for the offender? The judge is not a minister or a priest. Perhaps he is not even a member of any church. He is a politician. Perhaps many of those he sends to prison are better people than he. Yet, after all, the judge is not heartless, and his reaction to the appeal of the policeman was expressed as follows: "To steal a loaf of bread under such circumstances is no crime."

    And now, hear the words of a clergyman who made a visit to the soup kitchen: "This is a sad lineup! All my life I have studied the problem of human misery, and I am not any closer to the solution of it than when I started. I suppose that as soon as these people have consumed their piece of bread soaked in syrup, they will be perfectly content with their existence and 4will not consent to work till they are driven to it by hunger."

    Is that a clergyman speaking? Seated in a comfortable study he has tried, all his life, to solve the problem about which he now utters his pronouncement, and from the profundity of his study and meditation, he has arrived at the conclusion that laziness is the cause of poverty. Oh, what blind leaders of blind people!

    Dear and Reverend Mr. Clergyman: Put aside your phrases about the Fall of Adam and about the Blood of Christ, and try instead to find the reason why there is so much unemployment in our age. Try to solve this problem in a manner worthy of a wide-awake human being and a clergyman.

    Hard times and soup kitchens are with us again. Each day during the past few months has brought us news of closed factories and reduced wages for the workers. In ...

    Swedish
    I D 2 c, II E 2, I B 4
  • Svenska Nyheter -- March 22, 1904
    Worse Than in Russia (Editorial)

    From our earliest years, we have been taught to look at the great country of the Czars as the most barbarous country in the world, a land where the government, through its officials and officers, will throw freethinking men and women, who had never been tried in court, into subterranean prisons, there to languish, or send them to work during the rest of their lives in the mines of Siberia. Siberia has been pictured to us as somewhat akin to the Hell that threatens through the dogmas of the church, a place where those "who enter here leave all hope behind."

    Here in the United States; "the land of freedom of thought and speech," we have become so used to dwell upon the woeful fate of the Russians who love liberty that we have forgotten to pay attention to our fellowmen in this country who suffer persecution "for the sake of their faith."

    2

    As far as we are concerned, we gladly permit the various religious sects to carry on their fight for the domain over the sinners, although we have to confess that the means employed by the sects are frequently far from noble. But when the secular powers take a hand in the fight, sentencing to prison members of a certain faith because they consider Saturday a holier day than Sunday, and, therefore, carry on work on the latter day, or when an attempt is made to expel from the Senate a person because he belongs to a sect, the dogmas of which are at variance with such as are generally held, then there is something the matter with our liberty of thought.

    Our reason for comparing the United States with Russia is the brutal manner in which a number of so-called "respectable" citizens of Telluride, Colorado, acted against members of the miners' union there, while the government there took no steps to stop the crimes committed by them. A telegram informs us that on last Tuesday night about one hundred members of the Citizens' Alliance, an organization consisting of mine owners, 3manufacturers, and prominent merchants, armed with guns and rifles, broke into homes of peaceful workers, and with cuts and blows compelled fathers of families to accompany them to a waiting express train. Pushed into the coaches of this train, the workers were transported out of the city, having been warned not to return. Most of those who were thus expelled from the city were members of the Miners' Union. Among them, however, were also certain people who had sympathized with the workers, one being A. P. Floaten, an alderman and highly respected merchant. This man had so far forgotten himself as to take a leading part in the campaign of the Socialist party in the city. This was the reason for his expulsion from the city.

    The American press has not found it necessary to raise its voice against this cowardly deed. Let it be supposed, however, that the armed robbers had been members of the miners' union, and that those who were attacked had been "prominent citizens." What would then have happened? The question is easily answered. Governor Peabody, so highly beloved by all the mine 4owners, would at once have sent his faithful sabre rattler, General Bell, to the place to take prisoners of war all members of the Miners' Union. The peace-loving press would praise the Governor and his General for having shown such alertness and vigor in a time of danger.

    We are yet leaning upon the oft repeated assurance that we are living in a land of freedom, a land of equality, in a land where all citizens have equal rights and duties. We believe--or at least, we wish to believe--that there are no anarchists in the United States, but if the Government in our country were to investigate the activities of the "prominent citizens" of Telluride, it would find that in that western city a breed of anarchists is being developed of the most sinister kind.

    By the right of physical force and guns one hundred capitalists drove eighty workers out of the city of Telluride in Colorado, simply because the workers dared to utilize the rights which belong to every citizen in this country. Did worse things ever happen in Russia?

    From our earliest years, we have been taught to look at the great country of the Czars as the most barbarous country in the world, a land where the government, ...

    Swedish
    I E, I D 2 a 3, I B 4, I F 6, I C
  • Svenska Nyheter -- April 19, 1904
    A Sermon by a "Learned" Man (Editorial)

    His name is Eneas B. Goodwin; he belongs to the Roman Catholic church and is a professor at St. Cyril's University in Chicago. Last Sunday, speaking at the Ravenswood Roman Catholic church, his topic was: "No Room for additional Immigrants," and a precious sermon it was indeed. In the sermon the speaker displayed his enormous ignorance of the education and culture which have permeated the Scandinavian people and made the Swedish, the Norwegian, and the Danisk workers take their place among the best trained mechanics in the whole world.

    In his remarkable sermon he pointed to just the Scandinavian people as being non-desirable immigrants, designating them as "poor, narrow-minded foreigners." He had no remarks to make against immigrant Jews from Russia, but he informed his audience that the "Scandinavians left their countries 2as a result of the persecution of Jews in Russia," a most profound statement.

    In one of his brighter moments he let his listeners know that the immigrants from Scandinavia are not exactly poorhouse inmates. But then his mind became clouded again and he added: "Nevertheless it is a fact that poverty and hopeless misery have set their marks on the pale faces and the fallen-in cheeks of these immigrants."

    We do not know whether the professor ever ventured near enough to the ocean to get out upon one of the docks where the immigrants from the Scandinavian peninsula land. If not, then he ought to do so as soon as possible. But when he does, he ought to take care to leave his immigration sermon at home, for if he were to give expression at the dock to the thoughts contained in the sermon, it is quite possible that some one of these "hopeless, unintelligent foreigners" might undertake to teach the priest that the capacity for understanding of these people is unusually keen..... and that they are strong 3enough to defend their good name and reputation.

    The prelate professed his friendliness to labor in his sermon. His objection to the Scandinavians as immigrants had nothing to do with the fact that they were protestants. Far from it! Only his warm interest in the welfare of the native American workers prompted him to speak as he did; these foreigners were willing to work for and subsist upon one fourth of the amount required by the native workers.

    We have no right to impose upon the time of the precious professor, but if he would spare us a fraction of the time which he used to disseminate his infernal lies, we would take him to plants in any field of industry which he might designate, and produce facts to show that not only do the Swedes at work demand and get as high wages as do the native workers, but in hundreds of cases they get more.

    His name is Eneas B. Goodwin; he belongs to the Roman Catholic church and is a professor at St. Cyril's University in Chicago. Last Sunday, speaking at the Ravenswood Roman ...

    Swedish
    I H, I B 4, III G, I C, I C