The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- September 06, 1889
    [A Love Affair]

    The two love birds, the Chinaman Frank Lee and Miss Jenny Ericksen, who is Swedish, are not married yet. Mr. Ericksen stopped the marriage, because Jenny is not yet seventeen. Mr. Ericksen caused both Mr. Lee and Miss Ericksen to be arrested. The judge agreed that Jenny was too young to decide in the matter of her marriage.

    The two love birds, the Chinaman Frank Lee and Miss Jenny Ericksen, who is Swedish, are not married yet. Mr. Ericksen stopped the marriage, because Jenny is not yet seventeen. ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a, I B 3 b
  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 22, 1901
    [A Thought] for the Day (Editorial) by Carl Swensson

    The fact that the President's trip had to be canceled because of Mrs. McKinley's illness shows that human beings never will be other than poor earthly creatures.

    No place of honor, no homage, no nation's proud and happy patriotism, will free this earth-bound creature from suffering, from illness, from sorrow. In that respect our likeness to one another is greater than one thinks. We are all brothers, for we are all dust and ashes.

    But Mrs. McKinley's illness has elicited many a noble response from her, the President, and our nation as a whole.

    The patient had hardly recovered consciousness yesterday before she began 2praying that her illness not in any way interfere with the great festivities, which she hoped might proceed just as if nothing had happened. She inquired as to the well-being of the rest of the women in the company, and hoped that her indisposition would not interfere with others' pleasure in the party. This is what [that noble woman] said, though she herself was so ill that the doctor had little hope for her recovery.

    Mrs. McKinley has been weak and sickly for years, but this has never hindered her from devoting her whole heart and her warmest, most undivided interest, to the furthering of her husband's highest ambitions. She has done her utmost to be a helpmate for him, to lead him, and to lighten the heavy burdens which weighed upon his shoulders. Even in that respect her ambition far outstripped her physical powers, so that one of necessity tried to protect her from her beautiful, noble forgetfulness of self. Mrs. McKinley is old-fashioned enough to "be with her man" and to content herself with being his stay and joy and help.

    An old-fashioned thought, it is true, but one wafted from paradise itself in 3this time of selfish, masculine women, whose only motive for caring for their husbands and their homes is love of money; who, for the rest, have as life's aim the ability to remain something independent of, and apart from, their husbands; and the husband is no longer his wife's "head"--just as she should be his "heart"--but only her errandboy, her treasurer, her protector.

    Mrs. McKinley is a true, noble woman, and, this, her real womanliness, is ever her adornment. This virtue also makes it easy and natural for her husband's love, esteem, and trust to reach such heights under all circumstances. It is only an honorable, really womanly soul that a man seeks in his mate, if he himself is really a man. A man and a woman--that is life's, nature's, God's, combination for the realization of true happiness on earth and in one's community.

    One thing is sure: The man is less esteemed than in the past. Woman's development has monopolized the public mind for quite a number of decades. All for the woman--that has been the motto among us. What has been the result? Who can, who dares fully answer such a question?

    4

    One thing more is sure: No one breaks the laws of Nature and of God and escapes unscathed. No attempts to remove the distinctions between man and woman could, in the long run, succeed or be of any value. Woman will never successfully play the role of a man, nor, on the other hand, will man ever play that of woman. "The two are one", but neither of the halves will ever be successful in playing the other's part.

    Tens of thousands of true men, who read of the interest Mrs. McKinley always has taken in her man, in his happiness and success, in his development and prosperity, will sigh and think, though caution prevents them from actually saying the words, "Oh, to have a mate like that!" and at the same time [the activities and ways of their own wives] come to mind: the constant committee work, the club meetings, the grave and austere mien, the cold, forbidding heart, the air of self-importance which is so hard to describe--activities and traits which all are closely associated with "the modern woman," and which all are foreign to the old ideal of womanhood, when the wife was proudly and reverently called "the queen of the home".

    5

    A thousand cheers for Mrs. McKinley, mate and woman!

    Three "Vive's" for the Swedish, the Swedish-American woman--our mother, wife, daughter, sister; but a just and hearty condemnation for the mannish woman of our time.

    On the other hand the President has set an ideal example of how the man should cherish and protect "the weaker sex". He has never forgotten his wife, her need for love and kindness; her heart, her need for attention and support. He is his wife's true and faithful knight, a model husband whose excellence no one could surpass.

    These days have also shown how highly the nation loves its presidential pair. The whole country has felt as if one of the family has been ill. Hundreds of telegrams have brought greetings and inquired about the noble patient's condition. Our country loves and esteems its leaders; this is an unusually good sign of the times.

    6

    How happy we all are that we have heard by telegraph that the country's mother is much improved and that hope is held out for her quick recovery!

    But the same post has brought us the news of Mrs. Lyman Gage's death, Secretary Hay's illness, Governor Nash's poisoning by a dangerous growth in the forest, Miss Long's dangerous illness in Colorado Springs. Yes, it is true enough that we are dust and ashes, everyone, "Smalandingar". (Smaland-folk, or people of little province) before our Lord above.

    The fact that the President's trip had to be canceled because of Mrs. McKinley's illness shows that human beings never will be other than poor earthly creatures. No place of ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a, I K
  • Svenska Tribunen -- June 19, 1906
    [Bigamist Arrested]

    One day of happiness was the lot of one of our Chicago Swedes. Becoming Mrs. John Sundberg yesterday, she fainted today, when advised that Sundberg had a wife and children in Sweden. This seemed unbelievable, but when confronted by his wife for one day, he admitted that the accusation was true.

    Johanna Sundberg, a cousin of the bigamist, swore out a warrant for John Sundberg, who was immediately arrested.

    At the East Chicago Avenue police station, he made the following confession: He left Sweden for America, hoping to save enough money to buy a home and in order to bring his family here. During the first two years he wrote his family regularly. After two years, he wrote no more. Yesterday he married, committing bigamy; today he is under arrest.

    One day of happiness was the lot of one of our Chicago Swedes. Becoming Mrs. John Sundberg yesterday, she fainted today, when advised that Sundberg had a wife and children ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a, II E 2
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- August 21, 1906
    [Dahlstrom and Mattson Bound Over to Grand Jury]

    The colporteurs Albert Dahlstrom and Carl Mattson, whose case we reported in a previous issue, and who for the past several weeks have held their meetings in a tent on Fletcher Street near Clark, were called before Judge Mahoney on Friday, August 17. After a short hearing, the two were bound over to the Grand Jury on an eight-hundred dollar bond for each. The chief witness against the two culprits was Pastor Hult of the Lakeview Lutheran Messiah Church, whose main charge was that a vile book capable of doing much damage, was being sold at the tent meetings. Dahlstrom is the author of the book in question which is written in Swedish and entitled "Aktenskab, Quinnan och Hemmet" (Marriage, Woman and the Home).

    After hearing the translation of a part of this book, Judge Mahoney said, "If there is a living devil, this book is surely his work. I know of no other book that is as capable of destroying a home, a man, a woman, or a child as quickly and thoroughly as this one. The face of a woman who reads this book 2should become crimson at the beginning, and remain so for hours after. A book like this is not found on sale in a bookstore or at a newsstand, but it is put on sale in an open tent where there are women and children, and where the cloak of religion covers its devil-inspired, hypocritical contents as well as its author; it sells and works evil. It will ruin morally every reader--man, woman or child--and destroy the idea of motherhood in the home. This book must be suppressed."

    The one attorney defending Dahlstrom and Mattson attempted to rebuke the judge for his attitude to the evangelists and the book, but got nowhere in his attempt.

    That night Dahlstrom publicly declared that the Prophet Elijah had commanded him to preach the coming soon of Christ, and that churches should be destroyed, and the ministers killed (he called today's ministers Baal-priests who opposed Elijah). Well, Dowie also took out a patent on the Elijah (Elias) inspiration, and he went bankrupt in the role.

    The colporteurs Albert Dahlstrom and Carl Mattson, whose case we reported in a previous issue, and who for the past several weeks have held their meetings in a tent on ...

    Swedish
    II E 2, I B 3 a, I B 3 b, I B 4
  • Svenska Kuriren -- June 08, 1916
    Patriotism (Editorial)

    Patriotism is more than ever before the question of the day, and this for various reasons. First, of course, we have the European war and the possibility of the United States being involved; further, the controversy between Wilson and Roosevelt due to their different points of view in respect to the so-called hyphenated Americans, and in this connection the German-American Press and its attitude towards the approaching presidential election.

    In this last attack upon the foreign-born citizens, no particular reference has been made to the Swedish-Americans, nor has occasion for such attack been given by them either. From what we have learned, this is the reason why our countrymen are chagrined over the attack which the aforesaid foreign-born citizens have been subjected to. Particularly has ex-President Roosevelt's violent remarks against the German-Americans also been 2taken as a direct slam at our own countrymen. Unfortunately, the general opinion of the German-Americans is to overlook and forgive any arrogance against the Vaterland. It is not difficult to recognize these facts, which would have a strong response in all Swedish-American hearts, should Sweden also be dragged into this war inferno. They are unable to see any justification in these reproaches, as the loyalty of the so-called foreign citizens has not diminished in any way, and they are also free to question and declare their opinions as to the foreign policy of the United States.

    Next after the Irish, who have the enormous advantage of having command of the language of the new land, the Swedes perhaps become most quickly Americanized. Whereas they before held themselves aloof from politics, this has changed. They are now rather in politics as a body.

    The Swedes in America cling to certain old-country customs. They usually 3marry within their own nationality. Nearly all wish to celebrate Midsummer Day in the old-fashioned, old-country style, and in many states they have formed Swedish-American political State organizations, the object of which is to support the Republican Party without any egotistic plans.

    In spite of the fact that immigration from Sweden during the last twenty years hardly balances the number of the dead among our old settlers during the same period, the Swedish-American newspapers have at present a much larger circulation than they had twenty years ago. In addition, these papers are also much better edited and more comprehensive. Without exception, they all try to further rather than hinder the process of Americanization. The Swedish Church in America has very little influence in preserving Swedish nationalism. As an illustration, we can point out that the church organizations are unable to hold their own by depending upon the immigrants from Sweden alone, but must necessarily now seek their adherents among the first and later generations (American born). The natural result of this is that the 4English language more and more pushes the Swedish language to the wall.

    The Swedish-Americans certainly do not need any urging toward Americanization. The following incident, which happened a short time ago, is more illustrative than comical: A Swedish minister, Pastor Carl J. Holm of Massachusetts, in a sermon in the Second Congregational Church in Quinsigamond, upbraided his countrymen for their lack of patriotism, giving as proof that we sing too often "Ja, jag vil lefva, jag vil do i Norden" (yes, I will live; I will die in the North).

    For this occasion Pastor Holm got his text from the first chapter of The Book of Ruth, which relates how Naomi, after the death of her husband and two sons, and after many years of vicissitude in the land of Moab, starts on her return journey to Bethlehem, the home of her forefathers. One of her daughters-in-law, the widow Ruth, wished to follow her, and when Naomi, admonishes her to remain in her nation's land, Ruth answers her in a gentle and exalted expression: 5"Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go, and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God:

    "Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but death part thee and me."

    We must necessarily note that the text chosen by the Reverend Holm for his rebuke to his Swedish-Americans, ill fits the interpretation he is trying to give it, namely, for the Swedes to remain here and to love their fosterland. Unfortunate Naomi "leaves America and goes back to her folks in Sweden," which means; from the land of the Moab, where she was a stranger, to the land of Judah and her own people, which she seems to prefer. Her son's wife Ruth goes with her through personal devotion to her mother-in-law as well as in the hope that she, as a lone young woman, will receive better protection and face a brighter future. With all due respect for the Holy Scriptures, from 6the foregoing we can draw one conclusion only: that Mrs. Ruth was a very smart young woman who knew how to appeal to her mother-in-law's tender feelings. We are also justified in assuming that Ruth, whose first husband was a Jew, also had thoughts of marrying another man of the same race. How this thought was later realized through Mr. Boaz, we all know, who have read the other three chapters of Ruth's little, interesting book.

    But, as said before, Pastor Holm's admonitions to the Swedes in the United States and his rebuke of their supposed lack of loyalty is more than usually unsuccessful; even though his text be taken from the Holy Scriptures.

    Patriotism is more than ever before the question of the day, and this for various reasons. First, of course, we have the European war and the possibility of the United ...

    Swedish
    III A, III B 3 a, I B 3 a, III C, I F 2, V A 2
  • Svenska Kuriren -- January 01, 1920
    Ludvig Larson

    Who doesn't know Mr. Ludvig Larson, on the corner of Chicago Avenue, and Sedgwick, near Hesselroth's old drug store? All Swedes who have lived in this good city for a few years know him.

    Mr. Larson has been in the restaurant business for a generation there on the ground floor; and the second floor is known as Larson Hall.

    Mr. Larson, together with his wife, nee Ida Ekblom, were pleasantly surprised in the old, honorable, Swedish-American manner, last Saturday in their home, 565 Arlington Place, by about one hundred friends. The occasion was Mrs. Larson's birthday. It has always been celebrated with a grand coffee party. Mr. Larson wondered why in the world there were so many men at Mr. Larson's kettle-drum. However, later in the evening, he was enlightened when the director, John E. Ericsson, seized a coffee cup by the ear, raised it, and 2inquired, if it were possible to obtain a bit of a "prod in the weather." Oh, yes-John E. is never long-winded so he was served willingly. He began by congratulating Mrs. Larson on her birthday, but rebuked the lord of the house for permitting his silver wedding anniversary, which fell on October 24, to pass uncelebrated by the many friends of the family.

    Ericsson, speaking for all the guests, wished Mr. and Mrs. Larson many happy years ahead, and reminded them that friendship never dies, that the friends they have acquired still stand as a fortress of protection about them. As a remembrance of the day and friendship, Mr. Ericsson, in behalf of those present, presented a charming loving cup in silver, and in it were many ringing, new, white silver dollars. Mr. Larson expressed thanks for himself and Mrs. Larson, for the beautiful gift, but still more for their friendship. The evening hours passed quickly amid pleasant conversation and merriment.

    3

    Ludvig Larson is a native of Westgotha; he was born in the vicinity of Skofde, October 2, 1860. While a young man he emigrated and came directly to Chicago. That was in 1881. After having worked nine years for others, he opened his own restaurant in 1890, at 370 Chicago Avenue. He has made himself known as a straightforward, honest and industrious business man. Only recently, he gave up the enterprise and became a real estate broker.

    Larson is a Swedish-American in the highest sense of the word. He loves the land of his adoption without sacrificing his love for the sod of his fathers. He prefers to speak the mother-tongue; he gets on best among his countrymen, and his most earnest efforts are for Swedish fraternaties in Chicago. He is a member of the first Swedish society in Chicago, Svea; he is likewise a member of Vega, and the Svithiod lodge of the Svithiod order.

    Mrs. Larson was born in Eksjo, Smaland. She has lived most of her life in Chicago. The couple have one child, a daughter.

    Who doesn't know Mr. Ludvig Larson, on the corner of Chicago Avenue, and Sedgwick, near Hesselroth's old drug store? All Swedes who have lived in this good city for a ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a, II A 2, V A 2, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter -- November 24, 1920
    A Much-Needed Reform (Editorial)

    The woman-suffrage amendment has now become law, and the women of America have finally obtained political equality with the men. This is, of course, as it should be. But there still remain injustices and unfair conditions that should be corrected, and our efforts in behalf of reform are by no means over. Voices are now being raised, demanding a new amendment to the Constitution for the purpose of invalidating the various state divorce laws, and in their place creating a uniform federal law which would be operative in every state in the Union.

    When one considers the numerous divorces granted by our courts in recent years, and the resulting marital scandals, the need for such a law becomes evident. The undersirable conditions cannot be done away with under the 2present system. Not long ago, a well-known jurist declared that he could not see why a uniform divorce law was not as necessary as a uniform bankruptcy law.

    The federal divorce law might be administered by the local districts courts, as is the case at present with the immigration laws. If that is done, it will not be so easy to circumvent the law. Remarriage before the time required by law has elapsed could more easily be prevented; and it would also become easier to catch men who have abandoned their families, as well as those who, after divorce, have been ordered by the court to pay a certain amount of money for the support of wife and children. Some of these men try to avoid their duty by moving from state to state.

    The woman-suffrage amendment has now become law, and the women of America have finally obtained political equality with the men. This is, of course, as it should be. But there ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a
  • Svenska Kuriren -- July 02, 1925
    Well-Known Swedish Family Wed Fifty Years

    The Golden Wedding was celebrated last week by Mr. and Mrs. Carl Alfred Sandell, 1640 Farragut Avenue. They have three sons, of whom Conrad is a noted inventor and instrument manufacturer, John the proprietor of a well-known costuming house, and Carl the proprietor of a custom tailoring establishment.

    The Golden Wedding was celebrated last week by Mr. and Mrs. Carl Alfred Sandell, 1640 Farragut Avenue. They have three sons, of whom Conrad is a noted inventor and instrument ...

    Swedish
    I B 3 a