The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Proletarec -- September 14, 1909
    Aim of the Slovenian Socialist Organization in America

    The principal aim of the Slovenian Socialist Organization in America is to organize all Slovenian workers into an International Socialist Party for the defense and interests of the working class, with no objection to religion or race; also to work on a wide distribution of workers‘ literature and newspapers; to organize public lectures, meetings, etc.; also to advocate and help our workers become citizens of this country and enjoy the full rights of citizens; and help members with moral and financial support in case of need.

    The principal aim of the Slovenian Socialist Organization in America is to organize all Slovenian workers into an International Socialist Party for the defense and interests of the working class, ...

    Slovene
    I E, III A
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- September 18, 1925
    Slovene Catholic Conference in South Chicago

    Last Sunday, the 20th of September, should live a long time in our memory. In that day our South Chicago was the place where the Slovenes' Catholic conference held its inauguration. Thousands of members and friends of our Catholic organizations came here and brought other thousands of their relatives with them to be present and witness this great celebration. Such or similar occasions, when people of our race gather together, is of great importanoce to our life in this country. Long time friends, missing for years or living apart in different places of America, found great joy in seeing each other. Valuable for their existence informations concerning working conditions, customs, etc., have been exchanged. New acquaintances and friendships have been developed. This occasion manifests our strong desire for unity and has been marked by colorful celebrations which will be remembered for a long time.

    Last Sunday, the 20th of September, should live a long time in our memory. In that day our South Chicago was the place where the Slovenes' Catholic conference held its ...

    Slovene
    III C, III A
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- January 08, 1926
    Chicago Colony Is Growing Fast

    The Slovenian colony in Chicago is growing surprising fast. For the last few months more than 100 new families have settled. The reason is the lack of opportunity for new and young generations in small towns. Chicago, with its vast industries, offers an excellent chance for ambitious young persons. Old Slovenian people, of course, feel badly in new surroundings and find it very hard to adjust themselves, being mine workers practically all their life.

    The Slovenian colony has good schools, recreation ahlls, etc. All this provides for good life.

    The Slovenian colony in Chicago is growing surprising fast. For the last few months more than 100 new families have settled. The reason is the lack of opportunity for new ...

    Slovene
    III A, III G
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- April 21, 1926
    Slovenian Settlement Life

    Our colony in Chicago is growing very fast. Reason for this is increasing industrial activity. Daily we see some new faces.

    Since we built a new church hall, every week some new entertainment is offered to people of our colony. Singing societies, dramatic clubs, etc., are giving weekly performances with choices of programs. This hall proved to be the best place to meet friends and relatives. It can easily accommodate over 1,500 persons.

    The opening of this modern hall is really a convincing fact of how badly we needed such premises. In the basement of the hall we have two bowling alleys and every evening you can find hundreds of people watching the play. The church has a pretty good income from this enterprise. In the room close to the bowling alleys we find a pool table, which also serves as a means for additional income to the church. 2 Due to the improvement in working conditions we notice great building and remodeling activities; new beautiful homes built by our people; old ones are remodeled to such an extent that you hardly can recognize them; new furniture is bought, and we see that our people are getting the best from civilized life, to which they hardly have been accustomed before their arrival in this country.

    Our colony in Chicago is growing very fast. Reason for this is increasing industrial activity. Daily we see some new faces. Since we built a new church hall, every week ...

    Slovene
    III A
  • Proletarec -- May 01, 1927
    Youth in the Slovene Fraternal Societies

    New thoughts and ideas develop every day. These new thoughts and ideas must find new outlets in the same manner as any mechanical implement or device. New implements, new thoughts and ideas are rarely accepted unanimously, and until they are accepted, they must struggle for their existence.

    The young generation in the Slovene National Benefit Society has developed new conceptions. To put these into operation under the old system would be impossible, so nothing more desirable could have happened than to have them branch into separate lodges in accordance with their new ideas.

    These new thoughts could not possibly be of any value to the parent lodges; yet when they were properly assembled in their new forms and put into operation, they met with surprising success. Unheard 2 of events, houses filled to capacity, things done just a little different from the others. From the way these events were received, we must feel that they were welcome wholeheartedly. It is our desire and our purpose to keep building the fraternal spirit and to keep pace with the most up-to-date styles of entertainment.

    But even today, after proving unusually successful (functioning for over a year and a half) some people still question the right of young English-speaking Slovenes to organize into subordinate lodges. Nevertheless, we must say that a big majority of the membership, as well as the main body of officials, have given the movement considerable support. In the main, however, it is not our purpose nor is it proper for any participant or sympathizer to denounce those not actually in favor of the movement, but rather to produce evidence and proof to convince them that the policies pursued are safe, sound, and justifiable. All claims that the young generation could not exist and function should be banished immediately, for 3 the performances of the past year well verify our statement that more life and energy in the subordinate lodges has never been brought to light. Of course, reference is made to the seventeen English-speaking lodges of the SNPJ. Baseball and other sports did not materialize as many predicted. Instead, membership campaigns, dances, picnics, and other means of obtaining funds to bolster the locals were instituted. One could venture to say that these newly organized people are considerably more interested in the affairs of their respective lodges than can be said of the majority of the elders.

    We don't doubt a bit that it was likewise with our parent lodges. Good will, plenty of life and enthusiasm, and mainly excellent results were obtainable when they were founded. But goodness how this has diminished! Solely for the reason that the discussions and thoughts concurred in were of the plain repeated style. What we propose to do, however, is to use variety, by giving the young generation the most modern disposition and meaning of fraternalism; 4 the most up-to-date kind of amusement and entertainment; and the most sincere cooperation and friendship.

    Experience is the best instructor. And while a few profess to have an exceptionally rare collection of knowledge, the membership is learning from day to day; correcting the inaccuracies of previous mornings. As time passes, a better system will be instituted as the result of a better understanding of the fraternal situation. As a general rule most of the young element is fairly well situated in other English fraternal organizations, so that our task of interesting them is somewhat difficult. Other fraternal organizations have more to offer in the way of recreation than the SNPJ. Consequently the above is true. Organizers must use precaution and good judgment, because the disposition of those of the age limit is very indefinite and quite obscure. We must not only talk fraternalism to them; no, that will never do. It is essential that we mention social functions as well, until they have sufficiently mastered 5 the scope of our field. You elders - your tasks were hard. Ours are none the easier. Lend us your support; especially in the localities where the population is widely scattered. The future of any Slovene fraternal organization lies in the hands of the offspring. Similar expressions are heard and read frequently. But it is not sufficient to merely speak and write these words. It is necessary that these remarks be backed with moral and financial support. And what about the Slovene language? What effect will these new organizations have upon it? Heated discussions on the subject are witnessed regularly. From the most timid tales to the most capable defensive arguments one is able to pick statements that would astonish even the most unconcerned bystander. Some fear that the Slovene fraternal organizations have reached their limit; that the English subsidiary is their only salvation. Others quite differently proclaim no fear for the language, even for the distant future. And so we conceive the opinion that no immediate change is to take place in our generation because within the rank and file there exist a large 6 percentage of those favorable to the organization of these English lodges yet willing to sacrifice time and money for the development of the Slovene language.

    It is true that the official business of these lodges is transacted in the English language, but it is also true that a greater percentage of these youngsters attempt in either speak, read, write, or sing in the Slovene language now more than heretofore. Prosveta is read with delight, for it is convenient to glance from its pages to the other sections for various announcements and suggestions. What is more, magazines such as Mladinski List and Proletarec, while not in the limelight, bear great watching. Perfected to a higher degree of satisfaction, such magazines will be of great assistance in partially keeping up the nationality. However, if the Slovene language is destined to extinction in this country, the English-speaking lodges will not be the cause nor will such lodges bear the responsibility. Besides being a well-balanced fraternal organization, the Slovene National Benefit Society is known to be a powerful weapon 7 when used in defense of the workers.

    Without question it must be said that conditions, both working and living, have been improved. Organizations such as our fraternal order have been responsible, at least in part, in bringing about such improvement. You might consider such action as entering politics, but politics or otherwise, if the steps taken will bring about better living and working conditions, I deem it essential and necessary to say that our fraternal societies continue pursuing such tactics as long as the prevailing system of plundering the masses last. The Jugoslav Socialist Federation and its educational department is another institution which is also active in all such struggles, as is the League for Industrial Democracy. Knowing this, how can we fail to support them? Remembering that the years will tell the story of your present behavior, let us make history as it has never been made before.

    In conclusion it is necessary to appeal to the Jugoslavs of this 8 country to help build up their race by organizing new English-speaking lodges, to keep and uphold the race by bringing up their offspring so they can speak the Jugoslav language and to support such institutions from whom most benefit is derived. If you do this, we can assure you that our language will not die; that the movement will grow and prosper and will not astonish or amaze anyone.

    Donald J. Lotrich.

    New thoughts and ideas develop every day. These new thoughts and ideas must find new outlets in the same manner as any mechanical implement or device. New implements, new thoughts ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, III A, III E, II B 3
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- September 08, 1928
    First Duty of Citizen

    The greatest right of every citizen of this democratic country is the vote. We are sorry to state that the majority of our people do not recognize the value of this right and fail to exercise this most important duty. The result of this failure is political mischief. The public pays a heavy penalty having the wrong kind or politicians and by lack of understanding how important it is to vote. A great number of our Slovenians used to say, "I do not care for politics." This attitude is entirely wrong and should be changed by political education.

    People cannot have the right kind of goverment and cannot govern themselves unless they take part in electing their political leaders, which in this country oan be accomplished only by a majority vote. Political influence is so important in the life of every citizen that it is a crime to neglect the duty of controling this widespread influence. We strongly advice our people to get away from political lethargy and fully exercise their first and chief duty as American citizens by voting.

    The greatest right of every citizen of this democratic country is the vote. We are sorry to state that the majority of our people do not recognize the value of ...

    Slovene
    III A, I F 3
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- October 18, 1928
    Citizenship School in South Chicago

    In last week's issue, readers of Amerikanski Slovenec can notice a very important announcement regarding a new citizenship school to be opened very soon in South Chicago. The organizing committee invites all Slovenian women and men in our colony to be present at the meeting, October 18, where plans for opening this school will be discussed. The main object of this long needed school is to educate people in ways and means of becoming citizens of this country.

    A great number of articles have been printed dealing with the important question of becoming citizens. Sincere and sensible advice has been passed on how to take part in political life in this country, but still the fact remains that our people are the most ignorant people of this country so far as politics are concerned. They accept bills, taxes, assessments, etc., without questioning their rightfulness or the size of their bills. They will be more careful if they had their citizenship and political education.

    In last week's issue, readers of Amerikanski Slovenec can notice a very important announcement regarding a new citizenship school to be opened very soon in South Chicago. The organizing committee ...

    Slovene
    III A, II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Proletarec -- April 25, 1929
    Here and There Among Us in Chicago

    Often we glance back into the early days of childhood, dreaming of how we used to run about as free as the air. Comparing those never-to-be-forgotten days with the present, we say to ourselves, What a change! For well do we remember the old Slovene settlement at Twenty-second and Wood streets, when that settlement was in its prime, when the industries were flourishing in the car shops, the lumber yards, etc. The noon factory whistles would blow and a mass of humanity would dash across Blue Island avenue into their favored places with a pail called ‘pint.’ Today the noon whistles still blow, but not nearly as many humans scamper across the street; the stores of the avenue look deserted.

    What a change in so short a time! Of course, the war came and out of the war many hardships. Many disabled boys, many new millionaires and a period of depression. That hit our people hard, no doubt.

    2

    Yes, new machinery, too, has been invented displacing men. Many have moved to the west of the city; some to the north, others to the south. Yet, the flow of Slovenes from other cities and places in the most part from the mining districts, has refilled the territory. As one leaves another comes.

    Fifteen to twenty years is a long period of time, too. Within such a period much can be accomplished. But it is regrettable that the Slovenes in this vast metropolis have nothing outstanding to which one might point with pride. They have fostered fraternal societies, a church and church hall. Outside of a few small business undertakings, we have little to show.

    Our people have not been interested in politics, although they are becoming more conscious politically each year. Those that did participate in politics, for the most part always favored the Democratic and Republican administrations. Each year taxes would rise, jobs 3 would be fewer and harder to secure. Living necessities do not balance with the meager pay envelopes. So we struggle along just barely making both ends meet. Yet, our Slovene race as a whole is a progressive race. However, when you scrutinize their achievements, we are outspoken. We have no big DOM to which we might point with pride; no large business establishments; no cooperatives. Perhaps we did not need them as bad as other large Slovene settlements. It is because we have too many factions and let jealousy control our progress. Or is it because we always leave it to the other fellow to do the work? Whatever it may be, the fact remains that much more could be accomplished if the slogan of cooperation was inbedded in the mind and heart of our people.

    Isn't it a fact that jealousy has been responsible for so small a degree of success? Time and again folks would tell us about our fraternal life; about the friction caused by mere jealousy - and the organization of a new order wherein the years following. They had witnessed the same jealousy segregate subordinate groups. The 4 same jealousy retards the growth of any group and ours is no exception.

    Chicago has had a Slovene Socialist Club for a long time. During all these years and especially in the past fifteen years cultural work has been progressing at very slow rate. But a large percentage of what has been done in this field can be attributed to the efforts of the Socialist club. The club just naturally tackled the work and knowing the responsibility of such action, it marched along as best it could under our conditions. Plays of all descriptions have been produced, lectures on vital questions are held at frequent intervals, literature of all kinds is distributed, devotees of music and song display their wares with the club's choir.

    Young friends, if you are at all active, or wish to become so, there is no better time than now to join the ranks of active Socialist workers. There is no need for you to remain outside of our ranks any longer and pass away the fleeting years in the mere satisfaction 5 of doing only what you must. Think of being able to help others. You will find more satisfaction in that. Your ability and your earnestness is wasted unless you give the world the best you possess. We would like to see you learn more about the economical conditions which have so much bearing on your environment.

    It is possible to do more in the next fifteen years than in the last fifteen. We believe so. We believe there are at least three hundred Slovenes in Chicago who should rightfully be attached to the Socialist club. It is possible with proper judgment and unity to do something to which you can point with pride and satisfaction in years to come.

    Donald J. Lotrich.

    Often we glance back into the early days of childhood, dreaming of how we used to run about as free as the air. Comparing those never-to-be-forgotten days with the present, ...

    Slovene
    III A, I C, I E