The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Proletarec -- March 31, 1908
    Slovenian Benevolent Society "Nada"

    The Slovenian women in Chicago have organized a new benevolent society called "Nada" (hope). Last Sunday, March 15th, twenty women signed applications for membership to this newly organized society.

    A membership card costs $1.00. Monthly dues are $.50. The society will pay $3 a week for sick benefit, and $50 in case of death.

    The Executive Board consists of:- Mary Jelich, President; Mary Grileo, Vice- President; Angela Norvat, Treasurer.

    Controling Committee:- Ursula Koshnik, Mary Sottar, Anna Krizanich.

    The Committee for the sick includes Mrs. Zavitnik and Mrs. Neden.

    The Slovenian women in Chicago have organized a new benevolent society called "Nada" (hope). Last Sunday, March 15th, twenty women signed applications for membership to this newly organized society. A ...

    Slovene
    II D 1
  • Radnicka Straza -- October 03, 1912
    A Socialist Convention

    The SLOVENSKA NARODNA PODPORNA JEDNOTA (Slovenian National Benefit Union) decided at its fifth Convention, which was held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to work for socialistic principles. Delegates of 10,000 members, who are scattered all over the United States will try to influence these Members to work for the Socialist party and to join it or the Jugoslav Socialist branches or where such do not exist to organize them.

    At the convention there were 130 delegates present, among them two from Mexico. Out of them 80 were members of some Socialist organization, while the rest of them side with socialism.

    At the contention as the main speaker was Comrad ETRINKRISTAN. His speech was well as of other Socialist speakers was received with great enthusiasm.

    The SLOVENSKA NARODNA PODPORNA JEDNOTA (Slovenian National Benefit Union) decided at its fifth Convention, which was held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to work for socialistic principles. Delegates of 10,000 members, who ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, III B 4
  • Proletarec -- December 18, 1917
    Conference of Slovenian Benevolent Societies in Chicago

    All Slovenian Benefit Societies located in Chicago and vicinity were invited to send their authorized representatives to a conference to be held on December 13.

    The following societies answered this request:

    "Narodni Vitezi" No.39

    "Slavia" No. 1

    "Slovenski Dom" No. 86

    "Nada" No. 102

    "Francisco Ferrer" No. 131

    "Modern Woodmen"

    "Slovenski Delavski Sokol"

    "Slovenia" (Bohemian)

    "Society No. 47"

    "Society No. 1"

    "Socialist Club No. 1"

    "Singing Society--Zora"

    Jugoslaven No. 104"

    "Slovenian Youth Society--Danica--No. 70"

    All Slovenian Benefit Societies located in Chicago and vicinity were invited to send their authorized representatives to a conference to be held on December 13. The following societies answered this ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, II B 1 a, III E
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- June 09, 1926
    The Richest Slovenian Benevolent Society

    The best answer we can offer to Slovenian National Benefit Society with regard to the accusation that our organization is progressing slowly, is the recent statistic. Our organization, as it can be found in the last financial report, has a capital of $1,535,000, which divided on 30,000 widow members that are being cared for by our society, will give 9. sum of $51.16 to each member, as benefit. Now, the official organ of SNPJ, in its last report shows that the benefit for a member amounts to only $42.46.

    Another part in SNPJ's financial report shows that the organization's capitalization is valued $42.46 per member, whereas our valuation shows $51.16 per member.

    With this information we are offering to the people of the Slovenian nation the right my to find out whether there exist any ground for the above mentioned accusation. It seems to us that the people from SNPJ lost all sense of right judgment.

    The best answer we can offer to Slovenian National Benefit Society with regard to the accusation that our organization is progressing slowly, is the recent statistic. Our organization, as it ...

    Slovene
    II D 1
  • Proletarec -- May 01, 1927
    Youth in the Slovene Fraternal Societies

    New thoughts and ideas develop every day. These new thoughts and ideas must find new outlets in the same manner as any mechanical implement or device. New implements, new thoughts and ideas are rarely accepted unanimously, and until they are accepted, they must struggle for their existence.

    The young generation in the Slovene National Benefit Society has developed new conceptions. To put these into operation under the old system would be impossible, so nothing more desirable could have happened than to have them branch into separate lodges in accordance with their new ideas.

    These new thoughts could not possibly be of any value to the parent lodges; yet when they were properly assembled in their new forms and put into operation, they met with surprising success. Unheard 2 of events, houses filled to capacity, things done just a little different from the others. From the way these events were received, we must feel that they were welcome wholeheartedly. It is our desire and our purpose to keep building the fraternal spirit and to keep pace with the most up-to-date styles of entertainment.

    But even today, after proving unusually successful (functioning for over a year and a half) some people still question the right of young English-speaking Slovenes to organize into subordinate lodges. Nevertheless, we must say that a big majority of the membership, as well as the main body of officials, have given the movement considerable support. In the main, however, it is not our purpose nor is it proper for any participant or sympathizer to denounce those not actually in favor of the movement, but rather to produce evidence and proof to convince them that the policies pursued are safe, sound, and justifiable. All claims that the young generation could not exist and function should be banished immediately, for 3 the performances of the past year well verify our statement that more life and energy in the subordinate lodges has never been brought to light. Of course, reference is made to the seventeen English-speaking lodges of the SNPJ. Baseball and other sports did not materialize as many predicted. Instead, membership campaigns, dances, picnics, and other means of obtaining funds to bolster the locals were instituted. One could venture to say that these newly organized people are considerably more interested in the affairs of their respective lodges than can be said of the majority of the elders.

    We don't doubt a bit that it was likewise with our parent lodges. Good will, plenty of life and enthusiasm, and mainly excellent results were obtainable when they were founded. But goodness how this has diminished! Solely for the reason that the discussions and thoughts concurred in were of the plain repeated style. What we propose to do, however, is to use variety, by giving the young generation the most modern disposition and meaning of fraternalism; 4 the most up-to-date kind of amusement and entertainment; and the most sincere cooperation and friendship.

    Experience is the best instructor. And while a few profess to have an exceptionally rare collection of knowledge, the membership is learning from day to day; correcting the inaccuracies of previous mornings. As time passes, a better system will be instituted as the result of a better understanding of the fraternal situation. As a general rule most of the young element is fairly well situated in other English fraternal organizations, so that our task of interesting them is somewhat difficult. Other fraternal organizations have more to offer in the way of recreation than the SNPJ. Consequently the above is true. Organizers must use precaution and good judgment, because the disposition of those of the age limit is very indefinite and quite obscure. We must not only talk fraternalism to them; no, that will never do. It is essential that we mention social functions as well, until they have sufficiently mastered 5 the scope of our field. You elders - your tasks were hard. Ours are none the easier. Lend us your support; especially in the localities where the population is widely scattered. The future of any Slovene fraternal organization lies in the hands of the offspring. Similar expressions are heard and read frequently. But it is not sufficient to merely speak and write these words. It is necessary that these remarks be backed with moral and financial support. And what about the Slovene language? What effect will these new organizations have upon it? Heated discussions on the subject are witnessed regularly. From the most timid tales to the most capable defensive arguments one is able to pick statements that would astonish even the most unconcerned bystander. Some fear that the Slovene fraternal organizations have reached their limit; that the English subsidiary is their only salvation. Others quite differently proclaim no fear for the language, even for the distant future. And so we conceive the opinion that no immediate change is to take place in our generation because within the rank and file there exist a large 6 percentage of those favorable to the organization of these English lodges yet willing to sacrifice time and money for the development of the Slovene language.

    It is true that the official business of these lodges is transacted in the English language, but it is also true that a greater percentage of these youngsters attempt in either speak, read, write, or sing in the Slovene language now more than heretofore. Prosveta is read with delight, for it is convenient to glance from its pages to the other sections for various announcements and suggestions. What is more, magazines such as Mladinski List and Proletarec, while not in the limelight, bear great watching. Perfected to a higher degree of satisfaction, such magazines will be of great assistance in partially keeping up the nationality. However, if the Slovene language is destined to extinction in this country, the English-speaking lodges will not be the cause nor will such lodges bear the responsibility. Besides being a well-balanced fraternal organization, the Slovene National Benefit Society is known to be a powerful weapon 7 when used in defense of the workers.

    Without question it must be said that conditions, both working and living, have been improved. Organizations such as our fraternal order have been responsible, at least in part, in bringing about such improvement. You might consider such action as entering politics, but politics or otherwise, if the steps taken will bring about better living and working conditions, I deem it essential and necessary to say that our fraternal societies continue pursuing such tactics as long as the prevailing system of plundering the masses last. The Jugoslav Socialist Federation and its educational department is another institution which is also active in all such struggles, as is the League for Industrial Democracy. Knowing this, how can we fail to support them? Remembering that the years will tell the story of your present behavior, let us make history as it has never been made before.

    In conclusion it is necessary to appeal to the Jugoslavs of this 8 country to help build up their race by organizing new English-speaking lodges, to keep and uphold the race by bringing up their offspring so they can speak the Jugoslav language and to support such institutions from whom most benefit is derived. If you do this, we can assure you that our language will not die; that the movement will grow and prosper and will not astonish or amaze anyone.

    Donald J. Lotrich.

    New thoughts and ideas develop every day. These new thoughts and ideas must find new outlets in the same manner as any mechanical implement or device. New implements, new thoughts ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, III A, III E, II B 3
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- November 27, 1928
    (No headline)

    It had long been the desire of our people in Chicago that all small organizations, the existence of which, it seems, always have been endangered by lack of members and financial conditions, to be united in one strong society. It took a long time to come to actual amalgamation, but at last it was accomplished to the satisfaction of all.

    We, Slovenians in Chicago, had over fifteen small benevolent lodges. Upkeep of such number of lodges with members of same nationality, with similar rules and regulations, looks just foolish. People wasted money on so many rents, secretaries, etc., and if we are to take into consideration personal jealousy among officials of those small lodges, here we have a clear picture of the handicap which holds the activities down.

    No wonder that a great number of members of various lodges started protesting against such doings, and after quite a fierce fight, they succeeded in bringing unification and amalgamation.

    2

    The new society was named United Lodges of Chicago K. S. K. Jednote. The general idea of this new united organization is as follows: To keep the organization's expenses down as much as possible; to increase sick benefit for outstanding members; strong representation on national conventions; promotion of good will among former members of small lodges; stronger support of our church St. Stjefan, etc.

    We all must admit the great importance of such unity and are sincerely congratulating the individuals on the hard work which brought this excellent idea to life.

    It had long been the desire of our people in Chicago that all small organizations, the existence of which, it seems, always have been endangered by lack of members and ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, III B 2
  • Memorial Book of First All - Slavic Singing Festival -- [Unknown date]
    Slovan Singing Society

    Slovenes, like other Slavic nations, love and admire good music, vocal and instrumental. They love to sing on every occasion - at picnics, parties, dances, weddings, and christenings. This racial characteristic was the potential reason for the organization of the Slovan Singing Society twenty-nine years ago (1905) in South Chicago. Immigration to the United States was not restricted at that time, and thousands of young men and women from the former Austrian provinces of Carniola, Carinthia, and Lower Styria - all three included in Slovenia - crossed the Atlantic in the hope of earning a better living under Uncle Sam than under the Austrian double eagle. The group settling in South Chicago and the near-by Pullman district lost no time in organizing their fraternal lodges, for America, unlike Europe, did not provide government insurance against loss by sickness or injury. They also united to establish singing clubs in the early nineties.

    2

    The Slovan Society was the first Slovene club organized with a single object - the preservation of Slovene song in Chicago. This purpose is still the only motive that keeps the society in existence as years with their achievements roll by. At present the Slovan is the oldest Slovene singing society in the United States; like other societies and clubs, it has had difficulties throughout its long career. Financial problems, lack of proper instructors, the World War, emigration and immigration restrictions were some of the obstacles which at times almost ruined the organization. At present the Slovan has seventy active members, the majority of them men. Never before in its history has the Society had so large a membership.

    Throughout its twenty-nine years of existence the Slovan Society has regularly given one or more concerts a year; sometimes as a male chorus, sometimes as a mixed chorus, and as a male chorus at times including both choruses in its program. In former years dramatic performances also were presented. The Slovan has at all times maintained friendly relations with other Slovene singing societies, and on many occasions it has co-operated with Slovene, Croatian, Servian, and German clubs in giving concerts. The outstanding events in the Society's history were the gala concert performances on its twentieth and twenty-fifth anniversaries in 1925 and 1930.

    3

    An elaborate singing festival is contermolated for the thirtieth anniversary in 1935. The Slovan is the only Slovene singing society on Chicago's greater South Side. Its present headquarters are in the Calumet Park field house. In the course of its existence the Slovan has had seven directors, and Mr. Mirko G. Kuhel, the present director, has wielded the baton for the last nine and a half years. Mr. Kuhel came to America fourteen years ago. He has been a student at St. Stanislaus‘ College in Slovenia; he attended high school here and completed two years of college-work. He was then appointed to an executive position in one of the Slovene—American fraternal insurance corporations and since that time had very little leisure for other activities.

    Mr. Kuhel devotes his spare hours to directing the Slovan chorus because of his love for Slovene song. Since he received his education on both continents, he is particularly well adapted to give instruction in Slovene music both to immigrants and to American-born members of the choir. The Society has co-operated heartily in the movement to organize the United Slavic choral Societies of Chicago, and sincerely hopes that a permanent association will be founded.

    Slovenes, like other Slavic nations, love and admire good music, vocal and instrumental. They love to sing on every occasion - at picnics, parties, dances, weddings, and christenings. This racial ...

    Slovene
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 1, II D 1, II D 2, V A 1, III G, I A 1 a, I D 1 b, I B 4, I G, I C, IV
  • Majski Glas (May Herald) -- [Unknown date]
    In the Vanguard

    Progressive Slovene Fraternal Benefit Societies in this country today, among which the Slovene National Benefit Society is the largest, are the work of pioneer Socialists, who had foresight, men who realized that the workers are left to shift for themselves and are exploited on every hand unless they are strongly organized. Therefore the Socialists were pioneering the ground for the unions, for the cooperative movement, for educational work and at the same time were fighting for old age pensions and other types of social insurance.

    That was the work they were doing thirty years ago. At that time private insurance companies were the only type of insurance companies in the field. Socialists realized at that time that private insurance companies were in the field to reap as much profits for their owners as possible. Today it is well known that they are a legalized racket.

    2

    To the Jugoslav Socialist Federation and its official publication, Proletarec, we owe a debt of gratitude for the noble work it has been carrying on among the old generation of Slovenes in America and the American-born Slovenes for over three decades in the political, economic and industrial fields.

    Progressive Slovene Fraternal Benefit Societies in this country today, among which the Slovene National Benefit Society is the largest, are the work of pioneer Socialists, who had foresight, men who ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, II D 2, I E
  • Majski Glas (May Herald) -- [Unknown date]
    In the Vanguard

    Progressive Slovene Fraternal Benefit societies in this country today, among which the Slovene National Benefit Society is the largest, are the work of pioneer Socialists, who had foresight, men who realized that the workers are left to shift for themselves and are exploited on every hand unless they are strongly organized. Therefore, the Socialists were pioneering the ground for the unions, for the cooperative movement, for educational work and at the same time were fighting for old age pensions and other types of social insurance.

    That was the work they were doing thirty years ago. At that time private insurance companies were the only type of insurance companies in the field. Socialists realized at that time that private insurance companies were in the field to reap as much profit for their owners as possible. Today it is well known that they are a legalized racket.

    To the Jugoslav Socialist Federation and its official publication, Proletarec 2 we owe a debt of gratitude for the noble work it has been carrying on among the old generation of Slovenes in America and the American-born Slovenes for over three decades in the political, economic and industrial fields.

    Progressive Slovene Fraternal Benefit societies in this country today, among which the Slovene National Benefit Society is the largest, are the work of pioneer Socialists, who had foresight, men who ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, II D 2, I E
  • Proletarec -- [Unknown date]
    The Pioneers - Their Possibilities

    It has been said quite often that Pioneer Lodge No. 559, S.N.P.J., (Slovenia National Benefit Society) originated Nov. 13, 1925. The charter bears the inscription of twenty young men and women who gathered on that day to plant the seed which has flourished and blossomed into success in the field of activities and membership.

    Nature has planted us amidst a pleasing environment and atmosphere, in which we have found sparkling life and social activities aplenty. Good will and contentment has reigned with us always, and what we did not inherit we procured for ourselves.

    The whole wide world should know that the Pioneers were the first English speaking fraternal lodge of any Jugoslav fraternal society in the world. Is this boasting? Well, not exactly; but we wish to bring out the importance and significance of - "the first in the entire world". That phrase has probably more meaning than any consideration you have ever given it. Have not the Pioneers reason to feel proud? We can safely say that our relations with the parent organization have always been most respectful, and as we have often said, it is their existence and their comfort which has necessitated such actions as we have undertaken. A bright and unsurpassed future can be visualized. We can see the Pioneer Lodge of 1942, the largest of any lodge under the fold of the Slovenska 2 Narodna Potporna Jednota. Its membership must reach one thousand. Do you know why this is possible? Because we have adopted a broadminded program which will reach everyone; because of our willingness to cooperate to the fullest extent; and because we have the spirit and the knowledge of our power. We shall carry on until we reach our goal.

    We all realize the importance of the struggle, likewise its handicaps; but by turning every opportunity into a reality and favoring those who labor to make our very existence easier, we shall eventually surpass our prediction.

    It has been said quite often that Pioneer Lodge No. 559, S.N.P.J., (Slovenia National Benefit Society) originated Nov. 13, 1925. The charter bears the inscription of twenty young men and ...

    Slovene
    II D 1