The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Proletarec -- June 22, 1909
    Discrimination against Glas Svobode and its Owner

    On Dec. 26, 1908. the Slovenian Socialistic Club No. 1 in Chicago, issued a resolution condemning false representation by Glas Svobode and discriminating against its owner, M. Konda.

    The resolution reads as follows:- Whereas Glas Svobode, the so-called socialist newspaper published at 597 W. 20th St., Chicago, Ill., in the Slovenian language and owned by Martin Konda, proved itself through many articles, notes and paragraphs - especially through a certain article published in its issue, No. 43, dated Oct. 23, 1908, in which it recommended a Democratic candidate for election as non-socialistic and treasonable to the socialist principles and platform, and to the Socialist Party at large; whereas Glas Svobode admitted in issue No. 43 dated Oct. 23, 1908, frankly with the words: "We never said that Glas Svobode would be a Socialist paper", as a non-socialistic action before the English Socialist Party, unfamiliar with the language and character of the paper and yet seeks financial aid from the Party; whereas, the said paper, Glas Svobode, declared itself in issue No. 43 dated Oct. 23, 1908, as a free-thinking and progressive paper, but still tells its readers how good a friend it is to the working people, so that the workers will buy the paper and thereby help fill the 2 pockets of its owner, Martin Konda.

    Therefore, be it resolved by members of South Slovenian Socialist Branch, Tenth Ward, Chicago, Cook County, Ill., at a regular meeting assembled Dec. 26, 1908, that said Glas Svobode is no more worthy of any moral or financial support from any existing socialist party or from socialists at large, and therefore is put on the unfair list of all socialists and class-conscious workers; and be it further

    Resolved, that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Executive Committee of the Cook County Socialist Party for adoption and to the national secretary of the Socialist Party of the U. S. for distribution to every socialist paper or magazine, to be given as wide a publication as possible.

    Chicago, Ill., Dec. 26, 1908.

    Chairman - Mike Kuloveo

    Secretary - Frank Podlipec

    On Dec. 26, 1908. the Slovenian Socialistic Club No. 1 in Chicago, issued a resolution condemning false representation by Glas Svobode and discriminating against its owner, M. Konda. The resolution ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Proletarec -- June 22, 1909
    Resolution Condemning Glas Svobode

    The Delegate Committee of the Socialist Party of Cook County, session held June 13, 1909, at 180 S. Washington St., Chicago, Ill., endorsed the following resolution:

    To the Cook County Delegate Committee, Grievance Committee Report in the case of 10th and 11th Ward Branches of the South Slovenian organization vs. Glas Svobode.

    The evidence submitted to the grievance committee is to the effect that the paper, Glas Svobode, is not a socialist paper.

    Its manager and owner, Martin Konda, admitted that it is an independent and free thought advocate, and that he is not a member of the socialist party.

    Now, therefore, as said, Glas Svobode has been listed by other well established party organs, and also supported by and through party commendation, and in view of the above unquestioned evidence, we, the Grievance Committee, find that said paper is not a socialist paper in the sense that other papers of the Socialist Party are (although it has in the past shown an apparent friendship and support 2 to the Socialist Party). We, therefore, recommend that the county secretary be instructed to send a copy of this resolution to the national secretary of the Socialist Party, who will submit it to the socialist press.

    Fraternally submitted,

    L. W. Hardy, J. N. Born, A. Fishman. A. A. Patterson, Jas. P. Larsen, Committee.

    Indorsed and accepted by the Delegate Committee, Socialist Party of Cook County, session held June 13, 1909.

    G. T. Fraenckel, Sec'y.

    The Delegate Committee of the Socialist Party of Cook County, session held June 13, 1909, at 180 S. Washington St., Chicago, Ill., endorsed the following resolution: To the Cook County ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Proletarec -- September 23, 1913
    Statement of Ownership, Management, Circulation, Etc. of Proletarec.

    Published weekly in Chicago, Illinois. Statement required by the Act of August 24, 1914.

    Editor: Frank Skof. 4006 W. 31st Street, Chicago, Ill.

    Managing Editor: Fr. Skof, 4006 W. 31st Street, Chicago. Ill.

    Publisher: Jugoslovenska Delavska

    Jiskovna Druzba. 4006 W. 31st Street, Chicago, Ill.

    Owner: Slovenian Section of So. Slavic Socailist Federation.

    Frank Podlipec, Trustee.

    Published weekly in Chicago, Illinois. Statement required by the Act of August 24, 1914. Editor: Frank Skof. 4006 W. 31st Street, Chicago, Ill. Managing Editor: Fr. Skof, 4006 W. 31st ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Znanje -- December 24, 1921
    For Slovenian Workers

    We recommend to Slovenian workers the newspaper Delavska Slovenija (The Working Slovenia), which is the property of the Jugoslav Cultural Club of Milwaukee. The address is: Delavska Slovenija, 383 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Subscription $2.50 per year.

    Today that is the only Slovenian paper in the hands of Slovenian workers, which will represent the interests of the workinj class in the spirit of our times.

    We call on Croatian and Serbian workers to recommend said paper to Slovenian workers, wherever they meet them. With this paper Slovenians have filled a gap which existed for a long time, not having a paper for Slovenian workers.

    We recommend to Slovenian workers the newspaper Delavska Slovenija (The Working Slovenia), which is the property of the Jugoslav Cultural Club of Milwaukee. The address is: Delavska Slovenija, 383 First ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 d 1, I C
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- January 27, 1925
    35Th Anniversary of the First Slovenian Newspaper in America

    This year, 1926, is the 35th anniversary of the first Slovenian newspaper in America. Our great joy is fully justified and we believe it will be shared by all our friends in America.

    We know what help we all got from Amerikanski Slovenec during many years of its existence. Friendly advice, interesting news concerning our life here and the people in the old country, educational and religious guarding; moral, and in many cases, even financial help: all what we are supposed to expect from a native publication we got, and got plenty of it. There is no doubt in our mind that we could not live without our newspaper. Our newspaper is our history; its power cannot be easily overlooked. Ask our old pioneers and leaders, our successful business people; all will confess that Amerikanski Slovenec played an important part in their life's struggles, in fights towards accomplishment.

    Our newspaper was the strong cement that united our divided opinion, our 2 ideal of native unity.

    It is true that our newspaper fulfills the ideal of native apostles. Thirty-five years ago the voice of a small newspaper told to our people the first truth, that there is hope for all of us in America to become solid in our ideas, economically powerful and a highly organized and respected nationality. From the Atlantic to the Pacific this friendly voice announced great news.

    For years and years Amerikanski Slovenec has filled its pages with stories illustrating our life and it will be the truth and nothing else if we claim that this newspaper is a living history of our people in this country.

    Amerikanski Slovenec was established Sept. 3. 1891. The first issue of this newspaper was printed on Racine Avenue, Chicago. The first issue and the others which followed during six months were a thing looking paper of two small pages. Even in this size Amerikanski Slovenec could not exist very long on account of chronical lack of money. For non-payment of rent it was evicted from its printing shop and forced to move to the Northside of Chicago. The only way to save the paper was to find someone who would have enough 3 money to finance it until subscriptions could cover the overhead. This solution was found in a deal which brought about the sale of Amerikanski Slovenec to an ex-priest from Tower, Minn., Father Buh, who paid $600 for it. The man who started it and owned it is our Chicago Slovenian Mr. Anton Murnik.

    Success came very soon, not through the financial standing of Father Buh, but through his hard work and influence. There never were enough subscribers to pay expenses, but Father Buh found the friendly support of a few sympathizers. This fact is convincing that it is not money that will keep a publication in existence, but the personal influence and energy of its managers.

    Amerikanski Slovenec moved to Tower. Minn., where Father Buh held a position as pastor in St. Martin's Church.

    The worst problem in the existence of‘ this newspaper was lack of good Slovenian writers. Reporters from small towns were not skilled in editorial work. Translated articles sounded so funny in the Slovene language that 4 many readers complained that they could not understand clearly the meaning of the articles.

    At that time Amerikanski Slovenec had already 600 subscribers and more than 200 copies were distributed free of charge. In spite of that, financial difficulties were pressing so hard that Father Buh was forced to sell it. This time, it seems, luck was on the side of Amerikanski Slovenec. The new owner, Tiskovna Druzba, Joliet, Ill., put the publication on a paying basis, but its normal existence came to an end on account of the transfer of its chief stockholder, Rev. Susterich, who went to Europe. Then came the joke of a lifetime: the Slovenian newspaper passed into German ownership. This period was fatal for the newspaper, but salvation came again when Amerikanski Slovenec was bought by its present owner, Tiskovna Druzba Edinost.

    We must repeat again that for over 35 years our Amerikanski Slovenec has been the beginning of everything in Slovenian life in America. We simply cannot imagine the existence of our social, cultural and benevolent societies without Amerikanski Slovenec. We are proud of being owners of our own and oldest newspaper, and intend to support it to the end.

    This year, 1926, is the 35th anniversary of the first Slovenian newspaper in America. Our great joy is fully justified and we believe it will be shared by all our ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 d 1
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- June 05, 1925
    We Must Support Our Newspaper

    We notice that our friends and supporters accepted with great satisfaction the enlarged size of our newspaper. We are receiving daily thousands of letters from all parts of this country, congratulating us on our efforts to improve the reading, matter and enlarge the size of our daily. This makes us happy and gives us energy to continue such policy.

    But in order to fulfill the already made promises to give our readers a newspaper of high standard and quality, as well as to meet the growing expenses incurred with newspaper expansion, we must have additional capital. We are in great need of a new and modern printing machinery to speed up work on a higher rate circulation. New appearance of the newspaper enlarged size, increase in reading matter, all these require more capital which, we are sorry to say, we are unable to secure from any other sources except from the reading public. Our plan to secure additional capital is plain, 2 we figure that the increased expenses can be covered by securing from 700 to 800 new subscribers, and we are strongly appealing to our readers and friends for this support.

    We do not need go further with an explanation why our Slovenes need their own and the only Catholic newspaper, nor what benefits they are getting by reading its very interesting and highly educational pages. We hope that such reasons already have been printed on many pages of this paper, but the only opinion we do express is that it would not be nice of Slovenes if, in this critical hour for our newspaper's existence, they will withdraw their helping hand. We do not have other means to provide additional capital, and we must assure you that without sufficient capital this paper cannot be published in an enlarged form or have better reading material.

    Now that we have laid down our problem, it is up to you, friends and readers, to help us with solicitation of a few hundred new subscribers, and if you succeed in this work we will keep our promises of going to the limit.

    3

    All Catholic organizations are requested to organize their work on solicitation, and as soon as we have the required number of new subscribers filled, our work on developing the newspaper will be fast.

    We notice that our friends and supporters accepted with great satisfaction the enlarged size of our newspaper. We are receiving daily thousands of letters from all parts of this country, ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 d 1
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- September 01, 1925
    Is That What You Call Honesty?

    The other day Martin Zeleznikar, president of the Slovenian National Benefit Society, issued a certain statement which is not as correct as it should be.

    He plainly announced that their organization is the biggest of its kind in this country. We are not interested in his opinion nor jealous of their organization's business or growth, but what really interests us and brought his statement to our attention is his accusation of our fanaticism, as well as his advice not to believe in the Roman God. We are not against religious tolerance because, living in this free country, we are used to that, but a broadcast of this nature coming from a person of the Catholic faith, is really surprising. Furthermore, we believe in everybody's liberty to believe or not to believe in certain doctrines, and cannot approve Mr. Zeleznikar's unholy propaganda, just to reject religion or faith in God as something worthless and unnecessary for the life of our Slovene people.

    2

    Mr. Zeleznikar and his followers from the Slovenian National Benefit Society may believe that their society is really as big as the whole world, but this opinion does not give them right to muscle into other people's faith, nor have they the authority to question the masses's belief in God. Being members or even leaders of a big national organization does not make them big enough to absorb or fully understand religious ideals and doctrines.

    Amerikanski Slovenec and its followers will guard their unbroken faith and will fight for their religious ideas to the last limit.

    The other day Martin Zeleznikar, president of the Slovenian National Benefit Society, issued a certain statement which is not as correct as it should be. He plainly announced that their ...

    Slovene
    III C, II B 2 d 1
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- September 10, 1925
    [Slovenian Newspapers]

    The Slovenian people in America are represented by more newspapers in America than any other nationality, proportionally. We do not see any reason to describe the great influence and importance of this press. but will name these existing publications. daily or weekly. They are as follows:

    (1) Amerikanski Slovenec, Catholic organ; (2) Ave Maria, Church organ; (3) Glasilo Kskj, Catholic people organ; (4) American Country, Independent; (5) Glas Naroda, Anti-religious; (6) Enakopravnost, Anti-Church and Socialist; (7) Gas, Anti-Church; (8) Prosveta, Organ of the Slovenian National Benefit Society; (9) Proletarec, Radical; (10) Me. List SNP, Prosveta branch of Youth organization; (11) Glas Svoboda, Radical; (12) Delavska Slovenia, Workers' organ; (13) Nas Doni, Independent; (14) Nova Doba, Independent.

    The Slovenian people in America are represented by more newspapers in America than any other nationality, proportionally. We do not see any reason to describe the great influence and importance ...

    Slovene
    II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2
  • Proletarec -- May 01, 1927
    Youth in the Slovene Fraternal Societies

    New thoughts and ideas develop every day. These new thoughts and ideas must find new outlets in the same manner as any mechanical implement or device. New implements, new thoughts and ideas are rarely accepted unanimously, and until they are accepted, they must struggle for their existence.

    The young generation in the Slovene National Benefit Society has developed new conceptions. To put these into operation under the old system would be impossible, so nothing more desirable could have happened than to have them branch into separate lodges in accordance with their new ideas.

    These new thoughts could not possibly be of any value to the parent lodges; yet when they were properly assembled in their new forms and put into operation, they met with surprising success. Unheard 2 of events, houses filled to capacity, things done just a little different from the others. From the way these events were received, we must feel that they were welcome wholeheartedly. It is our desire and our purpose to keep building the fraternal spirit and to keep pace with the most up-to-date styles of entertainment.

    But even today, after proving unusually successful (functioning for over a year and a half) some people still question the right of young English-speaking Slovenes to organize into subordinate lodges. Nevertheless, we must say that a big majority of the membership, as well as the main body of officials, have given the movement considerable support. In the main, however, it is not our purpose nor is it proper for any participant or sympathizer to denounce those not actually in favor of the movement, but rather to produce evidence and proof to convince them that the policies pursued are safe, sound, and justifiable. All claims that the young generation could not exist and function should be banished immediately, for 3 the performances of the past year well verify our statement that more life and energy in the subordinate lodges has never been brought to light. Of course, reference is made to the seventeen English-speaking lodges of the SNPJ. Baseball and other sports did not materialize as many predicted. Instead, membership campaigns, dances, picnics, and other means of obtaining funds to bolster the locals were instituted. One could venture to say that these newly organized people are considerably more interested in the affairs of their respective lodges than can be said of the majority of the elders.

    We don't doubt a bit that it was likewise with our parent lodges. Good will, plenty of life and enthusiasm, and mainly excellent results were obtainable when they were founded. But goodness how this has diminished! Solely for the reason that the discussions and thoughts concurred in were of the plain repeated style. What we propose to do, however, is to use variety, by giving the young generation the most modern disposition and meaning of fraternalism; 4 the most up-to-date kind of amusement and entertainment; and the most sincere cooperation and friendship.

    Experience is the best instructor. And while a few profess to have an exceptionally rare collection of knowledge, the membership is learning from day to day; correcting the inaccuracies of previous mornings. As time passes, a better system will be instituted as the result of a better understanding of the fraternal situation. As a general rule most of the young element is fairly well situated in other English fraternal organizations, so that our task of interesting them is somewhat difficult. Other fraternal organizations have more to offer in the way of recreation than the SNPJ. Consequently the above is true. Organizers must use precaution and good judgment, because the disposition of those of the age limit is very indefinite and quite obscure. We must not only talk fraternalism to them; no, that will never do. It is essential that we mention social functions as well, until they have sufficiently mastered 5 the scope of our field. You elders - your tasks were hard. Ours are none the easier. Lend us your support; especially in the localities where the population is widely scattered. The future of any Slovene fraternal organization lies in the hands of the offspring. Similar expressions are heard and read frequently. But it is not sufficient to merely speak and write these words. It is necessary that these remarks be backed with moral and financial support. And what about the Slovene language? What effect will these new organizations have upon it? Heated discussions on the subject are witnessed regularly. From the most timid tales to the most capable defensive arguments one is able to pick statements that would astonish even the most unconcerned bystander. Some fear that the Slovene fraternal organizations have reached their limit; that the English subsidiary is their only salvation. Others quite differently proclaim no fear for the language, even for the distant future. And so we conceive the opinion that no immediate change is to take place in our generation because within the rank and file there exist a large 6 percentage of those favorable to the organization of these English lodges yet willing to sacrifice time and money for the development of the Slovene language.

    It is true that the official business of these lodges is transacted in the English language, but it is also true that a greater percentage of these youngsters attempt in either speak, read, write, or sing in the Slovene language now more than heretofore. Prosveta is read with delight, for it is convenient to glance from its pages to the other sections for various announcements and suggestions. What is more, magazines such as Mladinski List and Proletarec, while not in the limelight, bear great watching. Perfected to a higher degree of satisfaction, such magazines will be of great assistance in partially keeping up the nationality. However, if the Slovene language is destined to extinction in this country, the English-speaking lodges will not be the cause nor will such lodges bear the responsibility. Besides being a well-balanced fraternal organization, the Slovene National Benefit Society is known to be a powerful weapon 7 when used in defense of the workers.

    Without question it must be said that conditions, both working and living, have been improved. Organizations such as our fraternal order have been responsible, at least in part, in bringing about such improvement. You might consider such action as entering politics, but politics or otherwise, if the steps taken will bring about better living and working conditions, I deem it essential and necessary to say that our fraternal societies continue pursuing such tactics as long as the prevailing system of plundering the masses last. The Jugoslav Socialist Federation and its educational department is another institution which is also active in all such struggles, as is the League for Industrial Democracy. Knowing this, how can we fail to support them? Remembering that the years will tell the story of your present behavior, let us make history as it has never been made before.

    In conclusion it is necessary to appeal to the Jugoslavs of this 8 country to help build up their race by organizing new English-speaking lodges, to keep and uphold the race by bringing up their offspring so they can speak the Jugoslav language and to support such institutions from whom most benefit is derived. If you do this, we can assure you that our language will not die; that the movement will grow and prosper and will not astonish or amaze anyone.

    Donald J. Lotrich.

    New thoughts and ideas develop every day. These new thoughts and ideas must find new outlets in the same manner as any mechanical implement or device. New implements, new thoughts ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, III A, III E, II B 3
  • Proletarec -- May 01, 1930
    Jugoslav Federation

    The Jugoslav Socialist Federation had its beginning in 1900, when the first socialist branch of Slovene workers was organized in Chicago. Its members took the leading part in establishing a corporation, starting with a paper, which was friendly to the Socialist movement and mainly educational in purpose.

    The task for them at the time was too heavy and the result therefore a failure. The branch was dissolved for two years. However, in 1903 the branch was restored and has been active ever since. With the appearance of Proletarec in 1906 and even before, because of the help of the weekly, Clas Svobade, other branches sprung up in various Slovene settlements.

    In 1906 and 1907 advanced workers of the Croat and Serb nationalities organized themselves in the Socialist branches. In December 1909 a preparatory conference was held in Chicago for the purpose of establishing a Jugoslav Socialist Federation. All Jugoslav nationalities were represented (Slovene, Croat, Serb, and Bulgarian). 2 The first convention was held July 4 and 5, 1910 in Chicago, at which time the Federation was born.

    Mahlone Barnes represented the Socialist Party at this conference.

    The growth of the Federation after its inception was very fast. During and after the war, however. many critica1 situations occurred. Our membership dwindled, branches disappeared, and two publications were lost. One, because it changed to a communistic paper, and the other was discontinued. Proletarec remained; advancing the cause, represented by the Federation.

    It survived those stormy days and continued its struggle in the interest of the workers. Its eighth regular convention will be held in Detroit, Michigan, May 30 being the opening date. It will be in session three days.

    The future looks bright, because it belongs to the Socialist movement and Socialism.

    The Jugoslav Socialist Federation had its beginning in 1900, when the first socialist branch of Slovene workers was organized in Chicago. Its members took the leading part in establishing a ...

    Slovene
    I E, II B 2 d 1