The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Proletarec -- February 21, 1911
    Slovenian Workers’ Singing Choir Orel

    Slovenes from Chicago and vicinity are cordially invited to a concert, to be presented by our well-known Slovenian Workers‘ Singing Choir "Orel." It will be given on February 25, in the People's Hall, at Central Avenue and 18th Street.

    Slovenes from Chicago and vicinity are cordially invited to a concert, to be presented by our well-known Slovenian Workers‘ Singing Choir "Orel." It will be given on February 25, in ...

    Slovene
    II B 1 a
  • Proletarec -- December 18, 1917
    Conference of Slovenian Benevolent Societies in Chicago

    All Slovenian Benefit Societies located in Chicago and vicinity were invited to send their authorized representatives to a conference to be held on December 13.

    The following societies answered this request:

    "Narodni Vitezi" No.39

    "Slavia" No. 1

    "Slovenski Dom" No. 86

    "Nada" No. 102

    "Francisco Ferrer" No. 131

    "Modern Woodmen"

    "Slovenski Delavski Sokol"

    "Slovenia" (Bohemian)

    "Society No. 47"

    "Society No. 1"

    "Socialist Club No. 1"

    "Singing Society--Zora"

    Jugoslaven No. 104"

    "Slovenian Youth Society--Danica--No. 70"

    All Slovenian Benefit Societies located in Chicago and vicinity were invited to send their authorized representatives to a conference to be held on December 13. The following societies answered this ...

    Slovene
    II D 1, II B 1 a, III E
  • Amerikanski Slovenec -- February 17, 1926
    Concert by the Singing Society "Adria"

    Last Sunday our young singing society ‘Adria’ gave a very successful concert with dance. On this occasion we noticed that our people got more and more interested in that kind of entertainment. Many times we have called our public to support morally and financially our cultural institutions, and this call goes especially for the support of the singing society "Adria," which in the short period of its existence already brought joy and happiness in the life of our colony.

    Our sincere thanks to all leaders and members of this organization.

    Last Sunday our young singing society ‘Adria’ gave a very successful concert with dance. On this occasion we noticed that our people got more and more interested in that kind ...

    Slovene
    II B 1 a
  • Memorial Book of the First All-Slavic Singing Festival -- [Unknown date]
    The Lira Slovene Singing Society

    In the year 1916 the Lira Singing Society was organized on the West Fide of Chicago, in the Slovene community which has its center at Cermak Road and Lincoln Street, as the Tamburica Society, taking its name from the popular Jugo-Slav instrument. The organizers were William Prijatel and John Weble. The club grew so rapidly that in a very short time it had eighty members. At that time it had a number of sponsoring members, and so it was decided that it was strong enough to add a singing group to the original instrumental group. The name of the club was changed, and it became the Lira Slovenian Singing and Tamburica Society.

    Its object was to promote Slovene singing and Slovene instrumental music. The following persons were its officers at the time of its organization: John Weble, president, Adolph Misja, secretary, and Jack Muha, treasurer.

    The singing group was under the direction of Mr. Muha, while Mr. Weble directed the tamburica-players. At this time both divisions advanced steadily, and the concerts which they gave were successful because the Lira was then the only Slovene singing and tamburica society in Chicago.

    2

    Since the World War had taken many of its members, the organization dropped the tamburica division and continued as a singing society only. At present the Lira Society has twenty active members, including three who have been with the organization since the beginning, namely, Mrs. Lollie Nemanich, Mr. John Weble. and Mr. Frank Kordesh. The Society for the last six years has been without the financial aid of any sponsoring members and continues to maintain itself by giving concerts once or twice a year. In its repertoire are selections from various operas and operettas, such as Martha, The Minuet, Il Trovatore, and Madame Butterfly, and also many artistic Slovene songs which had never before been introduced in Chicago.

    The fifteenth anniversary of the founding of the Lira Society was celebrated on Sunday, April 3, 1932, by a concert in which some other Jugo-Slav singing societies participated, among them two Slovene organizations, the Adrija and the Preseren, and one Croatian club, the Croatia. On various other occasions the Lira has cooperated with other Slavic singing societies.

    In the period of its existence the Lira Singing Society has had the following directors: Mr. Jack Muha, Mr. Arno M. Hess, Mr. Kindl, Mr. F. Kvederas, and Mr. Gabriel Chrzanowski. who has been our instructor since 1926.

    3

    The officers at present are John Weble, president, Frank Kordesh, vice-president, Evelyn Fabian, secretary, Vera Kordesh, recording secretary, and Lollie Nemanich, treasurer.

    In the year 1916 the Lira Singing Society was organized on the West Fide of Chicago, in the Slovene community which has its center at Cermak Road and Lincoln Street, ...

    Slovene
    II B 1 a
  • Memorial Book of First All - Slavic Singing Festival -- [Unknown date]
    Slovan Singing Society

    Slovenes, like other Slavic nations, love and admire good music, vocal and instrumental. They love to sing on every occasion - at picnics, parties, dances, weddings, and christenings. This racial characteristic was the potential reason for the organization of the Slovan Singing Society twenty-nine years ago (1905) in South Chicago. Immigration to the United States was not restricted at that time, and thousands of young men and women from the former Austrian provinces of Carniola, Carinthia, and Lower Styria - all three included in Slovenia - crossed the Atlantic in the hope of earning a better living under Uncle Sam than under the Austrian double eagle. The group settling in South Chicago and the near-by Pullman district lost no time in organizing their fraternal lodges, for America, unlike Europe, did not provide government insurance against loss by sickness or injury. They also united to establish singing clubs in the early nineties.

    2

    The Slovan Society was the first Slovene club organized with a single object - the preservation of Slovene song in Chicago. This purpose is still the only motive that keeps the society in existence as years with their achievements roll by. At present the Slovan is the oldest Slovene singing society in the United States; like other societies and clubs, it has had difficulties throughout its long career. Financial problems, lack of proper instructors, the World War, emigration and immigration restrictions were some of the obstacles which at times almost ruined the organization. At present the Slovan has seventy active members, the majority of them men. Never before in its history has the Society had so large a membership.

    Throughout its twenty-nine years of existence the Slovan Society has regularly given one or more concerts a year; sometimes as a male chorus, sometimes as a mixed chorus, and as a male chorus at times including both choruses in its program. In former years dramatic performances also were presented. The Slovan has at all times maintained friendly relations with other Slovene singing societies, and on many occasions it has co-operated with Slovene, Croatian, Servian, and German clubs in giving concerts. The outstanding events in the Society's history were the gala concert performances on its twentieth and twenty-fifth anniversaries in 1925 and 1930.

    3

    An elaborate singing festival is contermolated for the thirtieth anniversary in 1935. The Slovan is the only Slovene singing society on Chicago's greater South Side. Its present headquarters are in the Calumet Park field house. In the course of its existence the Slovan has had seven directors, and Mr. Mirko G. Kuhel, the present director, has wielded the baton for the last nine and a half years. Mr. Kuhel came to America fourteen years ago. He has been a student at St. Stanislaus‘ College in Slovenia; he attended high school here and completed two years of college-work. He was then appointed to an executive position in one of the Slovene—American fraternal insurance corporations and since that time had very little leisure for other activities.

    Mr. Kuhel devotes his spare hours to directing the Slovan chorus because of his love for Slovene song. Since he received his education on both continents, he is particularly well adapted to give instruction in Slovene music both to immigrants and to American-born members of the choir. The Society has co-operated heartily in the movement to organize the United Slavic choral Societies of Chicago, and sincerely hopes that a permanent association will be founded.

    Slovenes, like other Slavic nations, love and admire good music, vocal and instrumental. They love to sing on every occasion - at picnics, parties, dances, weddings, and christenings. This racial ...

    Slovene
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 1, II D 1, II D 2, V A 1, III G, I A 1 a, I D 1 b, I B 4, I G, I C, IV
  • Memorial Book of the First All-Slavic Singing Festival. -- [Unknown date]
    (No headline)

    The name Adrija means Adriatic. The sky-blue Adriatic Sea has always been an object of tender affection and almost devout reverence for Slovenes, and their love for it is reflected in their songs. They share this feeling with their southern neighbors and kinsmen, the Croats. A number of Slovene and Croatian singing societies call themselves Adrija or Jadran.

    The Adrija Slovene Singing Society of Chicago is a mixed choir. Since its organization fourteen years ago the number of its members has fluctuated. There have never been less than twenty-five nor more than forty-five active singers.

    The Adrija choir is affiliated with the Slovene Roman Catholic Church of St. Stephen, at Twenty-second Place and Lincoln Street in Chicago. Besides its liturgical singing in the aforesaid church the society gives one or two concerts every year in the school hall adjacent to St. Stephen's Church, 2 and it often renders programs for the lodges, clubs, and fraternities of the local community. It has also appeared on the concert programs of other Slovene singing societies in Chicago, namely, the Lira, the Zarja, the Sava, and the Preseren, and at present it is cooperating; with the oldest and largest of them all, the Slovan. Adrija was the first Slovene choir in Chicago to attempt the radio field; it has appeared in four Slovene radio programs over Station WHFC and in one program over Station WCFL. A number of Slovene phonograph records are also included in its list of accomplishments. These latter are characteristic sketches with dialogue and song, such as the Slovene Wedding Festival, the Announcement of Spring (Advent of St. George), and others.

    The Adrija choir by its untiring efforts and commendable sacrifices was instrumental in securing a new electro-pheumatic two-manual organ for St. Stephen's Church, installed February 19, 1928.

    The proceeds of the choir's various activities are turned over to the parochial treasury, and its needs are provided for, and its expenses paid by the parish.

    3

    New members for the Adrija choir are constantly being recruited from the ranks of the local parochial grammar-school graduates.

    The director of the Adrija Singing Society is Mr. Ivan Racic, organist of St. Stephen's Church. His connection with the choir goes back practically to its inception. Mr. Racic received some of his musical training in Europe and is now working for a degree in music at De Paul University in Chicago. He was the unanimous choice for leader of the Slovene aggregation of singers at the First All-Slavic Singing Festival in Chicago.

    The name Adrija means Adriatic. The sky-blue Adriatic Sea has always been an object of tender affection and almost devout reverence for Slovenes, and their love for it is reflected ...

    Slovene
    II B 1 a, II B 2 e, V A 1, III C