The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Soko (Sokol) -- June 01, 1912
    Serbian Sokol in Chicago

    The open-air exercises of the Sokol, presented on May 5, were a great success. They left a deep impression of appreciation and pride in the memories of the many friends and members who attended.

    The following societies were present: "Serbian Sokol," Gary, Indiana; "Srpsko Jedinstvo" (Serbian Unity); "Srpsko Jamburashko Drushtvo" (Serbian String Society); "Srladya" (Serbia); "Srpsko Pjevacko Drushtvo" (Serbian Singing Society); "Branko Raditchevich" Society, Chicago; "D.D.D. Oblich" Singing Society, Chicago; "Serbian-American Benevolent Society"; "Soko" (Sokol), Chicago; "Slavia," Bohemian Sokol; "Soko" (Sokol), Bohemian Oak Park; "Croatian Sokol"; "La Speranta," Rumanian Gymnastic Society.

    The open-air exercises of the Sokol, presented on May 5, were a great success. They left a deep impression of appreciation and pride in the memories of the many friends ...

    Serbian
    III B 2, II D 1
  • Pravda -- July 03, 1930
    Jugoslav Club in Chicago

    Our greatest ideal of strong unity among Serbians, Croatians and Slovenes never has been accomplished. It seems that the cement which we need to bring complete unity was lacking, and it was mutual understanding between not the race, but different classes. This grave problem at least was solved, as it concerns Chicago colonies, by organizing a Jugoslav club, which has just recently opened the door to members and friends, and is already showing noticeable progress.

    The first meeting, which the organized group held in the Morrison Hotel, brought a great number of our people. We are happy to advise our people that as far as we can remember, there was not a single occasion where people of different social, business, or professional standing met together, as it was seen on this meeting of the Jugoslav club.

    Doctors, engineers, priests, businessmen small and big, common laborers, etc., all united by the great problem of national unity, mixed together and showed most desirable equality.

    2

    The main object of this club, as we already announced, is promotion of national unity, but as we have been informed, the club will have quite a large activity in the way of organizing our groups in the way of financial, political, educational cooperation.

    Ugljeska Pupich, Secretary.

    Our greatest ideal of strong unity among Serbians, Croatians and Slovenes never has been accomplished. It seems that the cement which we need to bring complete unity was lacking, and ...

    Serbian
    I C, III B 2
  • Amerikanski Srbobran -- June 01, 1937
    35th Anniversary of the Serbian Society Lika and Krbava

    Thirty-five years of unselfish work on organizing people of Serbian extraction in South Chicago was celebrated on May 23rd of this year by the oldest known Serbian organization, Lika and Krbava.

    On this rare occasion hundreds of Serbians, Montenegrins, and the representives of other Slavic nations paid their tribute and homage to fifty-seven old members and pioneers who, thirty-five years ago, got the excellent idea of putting together unorganized old-timers.

    Hard work, patience, and love for their neighbors' welfare was the fundamental principle of this society. The self-preservation of those pioneers, of course, played a part in organizing this society.

    After a brilliant celebration, partially in church and outside, members and friends held a banquet in the church's hall. Dozens of speeches were 2delivered by prominent members of the Serbian colony, representatives of several societies, press and political organizations. This showed the attitude of the people toward the activities of the society Lika and Krbava.

    The general motive in these speeches was praise of the noble, self-sacrificing and energetic work done by the society in improving colony life, economically, culturally, educationally and religiously.

    In the evening the South Chicago Dramatic Club, assisted by a combined choir of a few singing societies, gave a well selected entertainment. The dance following continued until after midnight. Old and young were mixed in perfect harmony, enjoying the music, native songs, dances, games, etc.

    G. Kovacevich

    St. Louis, Mo.

    Thirty-five years of unselfish work on organizing people of Serbian extraction in South Chicago was celebrated on May 23rd of this year by the oldest known Serbian organization, Lika and ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, III B 2
  • [Association documents] -- [Unknown date]
    Memorial Book Srpsko Jedinstvo: The Junior Order of the United Serbian Society

    More than half a century has passed since our struggling forefathers emigrated from the sunny Adriatic shores of our brave Fatherland to the great bountiful land of freedom, these United States.

    Little did those pioneers know at the time that the outcome of their original Obilich Pleasure Club, consisting of just a few men, was to be the present-day United Serbian Society, a strong and independent benevolent society, with a foundation as firm as the Rock of Gibraltar.

    The founders of the United Serbian Society and those who came later endured many hardships to keep up such a society of their mother tongue in a new country and a strange environment. But pride, courage and perseverance guided them to the high ideals on which they founded the United Serbian Society, and on which the building of society and its 2youth is being carried on.

    In the first years men were the only ones admitted to membership. Later on, in 1917, women were invited to join, but not until 1921 was there the thought of having any child enter the society.

    Between the years 1921 and 1930 little was done to interest the children in joining the Junior Order, but in 1930, when the first elder, Mr. Rade Govedarica, was elected, the Junior Order began having its own meetings, officers and social functions.

    Mr. Jovo Simich followed Mr. Govdarica as elder and both did all they could to enroll more members and to inspire and acquaint them with our beautiful Serbian language. For the few short years of its activity, our Junior Order has to its credit an enrollment of 106 fine, healthy 3boys and girls ranging in age from two to twenty-one years.

    The activities of the group are many and varied. Regular monthly meetings are held. Everything is done in the Serbian language. At the head of the Junior Order we have a fine, intelligent girl, Desanka I. Tarailo, as president.

    She has held this position for a number of years and has filled it extremely well. She is competent in the Serbian language and is an active and willing worker in any undertaking. She is, indeed, a credit to the Junior Order.

    Bozo R. Nogulich stands out among the boys as the most active and acts as vice-president. A short time ago he was awarded a gold pin for having 4enrolled the largest number of new members in the order.

    One of the most interesting activities created in our Junior Order is the Tamburica Orchestra known as "The Happy Mountaineers," (or) Vesels Brdjani. They happily sing and play their cares away.

    The Junior Order maintains Serbian classes every Saturday, so that its boys and girls may avail themselves of the opportunity to learn how to read and write their beautiful language. There are three groups which meet at different hours, and they are classed as to their ability. About 65 attend every week. Besides reading, writing and history, they learn national songs, games and kolos (national dance).

    They are always willing and ready with recitations and plays whenever a program for some society is needed. All of these things help them to 5understand and know about their ancestral home better than they would know otherwise.

    Sports have not been neglected either. For the past three years a baseball and basketball team have been sponsored by the Junior Order. It has been supplied with Jerseys, caps, ball and other necessary equipment besides moral support. The team has played quite regularly and has been victorious over most of the teams played. The younger boys have organized a team also and play very well for their ages.

    One of the most outstanding events in the history of the Junior Order of the United Serbian Society occurred on June 9, 1935, when the Junior Order gave a modest gift to our church in Chicago, the Holy Resurrection, at 1905 Fowler St.

    6

    The gift was the icon of St. Sava, a beautiful masterpiece which will long remain in our church as a remembrance of its children who love the church and the memory of Saint Sava. The year 1935 was celebrated as St. Sava's year, for it was the 700th anniversary of the death of this famous monk, who first instilled religion and education into the hearts of our people.

    The Junior Order rightly celebrated St. Sava's year by studying all about him at meetings and classes throughout the entire year. The climax was the dedication of the icon in the church, on June 9th.

    All the children worked hard to earn the funds to purchase this icon by means of selling tickets in a popularity contest sponsored by the Junior Order.

    And so on, the Junior Order of the United Serbian Society keeps on its 7various activities. This is all due to the efforts of the children themselves, who take interest to do these things through the cooperation and fine support given them by the present officers and other interested members of the United Serbian Society; and through the parents who allow and urge their children to such activity.

    The generosity and kindness of the Serbian National Federation and its worthy secretary, Mr. Branko Perich, cannot be surpassed. The Serbian books which they provided for the Serbian children in the Chicago community proved a great help to us also. Their method of spreading Serbian culture is indeed praiseworthy. Many thanks to all of the above mentioned.

    The goal of the Junior Order is to outnumber the membership of the United Serbian Society itself, to work loyally and conscientiously on behalf of the society and the juniors, to preserve the ideals forwarded to them by the elders; to know the beautiful traditions and 8history of Jugoslavia, never to forget the mother tongue, to be good orthodox Christians living up to the standards of Pravoslaveye as taught by the immortal Sveti Sava; to be loyal sons of Jugoslavia; to understand and respect the ideals for which its heroic men fell, as did the never-to-be-forgotten King Alexander I, and finally, as young American citizens to respect and love their adopted country, the United States, and its great President, Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    By Nada Pasovich, Elder.

    More than half a century has passed since our struggling forefathers emigrated from the sunny Adriatic shores of our brave Fatherland to the great bountiful land of freedom, these United ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, III B 2, III E, II B 2 f
  • Daily Calumet -- [Unknown date]
    in the Scrapbook of Adam Popovich. Twenty Thousand Jugo-Slavs Attend Festivities Sunday at Century of Progress Exposition

    More than 20,000 Jugo-Slavs filled the west stands of Soldier Field at the Jugo-Slav Day festivities yesterday.

    Prior to the program a parade half a mile long marched to the monument created by Dr. Meshtrovich, which stands, at Congress street and Michigan avenue, and the statue was unveiled.

    Adam Popovich, a young man of South Deering, directed the hundred-piece tamburica orchestra. Folk-songs were rendered by the United Jugo-Slav Society. Choral societies from Detroit, St. Louis, and Cleveland also sang.

    The national folk-costume was everywhere in evidence. Only four Croatian girls of this district attended in folk-costume.

    Joseph W. Bazdavich, physical director of the Jugo-Slav Sokol Federation, 2supervised the gymnastic exercises.

    John Tilkovich, prominent Jugo-Slav composer and director of Detroit, directed the choral music, and Vaclav Husa led the band.

    American Legion Band 175 of the Woodlawn Post, Peoples Gas Company American Legion Post 310, Commonwealth Edison American Legion Post (champions of Illinois), and Semsley American Legion Post thrilled the vast crowd with army formations and musical numbers.

    The Jugo-Slav Children's Sokol and the Ladies' Auxiliary were reviewed on parade, followed by the Serbian Sisters.

    The Slovenian Ladies, headed by girls and youths, paraded in folk-costumes.

    The South Chicago Eagles were much in evidence.

    3

    Radmila Govedarica was declared Jugo-Slav World's Fair queen. She will receive a trip to Jugo-Slavia.

    Concluding the extensive program, Mrs. Brayak led the assembly in singing "My Country." Several thousand Jugo-Slav Day guests then visited the Century of Progress exposition.

    More than 20,000 Jugo-Slavs filled the west stands of Soldier Field at the Jugo-Slav Day festivities yesterday. Prior to the program a parade half a mile long marched to the ...

    Serbian
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a, II A 3 c, III B 2, II B 3, III E, IV
  • [Association documents] -- [Unknown date]
    Memorial Book Srpsko Jedinstvo: Why the Name "Srpsko Jedinstvo" Has Been Selected

    In 1878 the Chicago Serbian colony formed their first entertainment club, Obilich. In 1881 the first benevolent society, named Serbian and Montenegro Benevolent Society, was organized.

    Due to the prevailing idea that the Serbians, Herzegovinian and Montenegrin provinces must be united into one kingdom, it was found necessary to change separatistic names of existing societies to some name which would be acceptable by all Slav (Balkan) nationalities, and (which) would not suffer from future changes. So, on Oct. 17, 1894, delegates from the society Obilich and the Srpsko Montenegro Benevolent Society unanimously decided, during a meeting, to accept the new name of "United Serbian Society Jedinstvo," under which title the Illinois charter was drawn.

    In 1878 the Chicago Serbian colony formed their first entertainment club, Obilich. In 1881 the first benevolent society, named Serbian and Montenegro Benevolent Society, was organized. Due to the prevailing ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, III B 2
  • [Association documents] -- [Unknown date]
    Memorial Book Srpsko Jedinstvo: Srpsko Jedinstvo During the World War

    Immediately after the occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina by Austria, the real Serbian patriots all over the world got into lively action to help their people in the above mentioned provinces to free themselves from the enemy's rule.

    Among the most active organizations working on this worthy cause was Srpsko Jedinstvo. During the time of the Balkan war this society sent twenty volunteers to the front, plus a sizable sum of money to support the movement.

    As soon as the World War was begun the society Srpsko Jedinstvo formed a group of 45 members (young and middle-aged), fully equipped and sent them to the front. All expense for equipment and transportation was paid by the society. The society Srpsko Jedinstvo has been known for its patriotic inclination, and there was no worthy cause registered which did not draw its hearty support, financially and morally, from the society.

    Immediately after the occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina by Austria, the real Serbian patriots all over the world got into lively action to help their people in the above mentioned ...

    Serbian
    III H, III B 2, I G
  • [Association documents] -- [Unknown date]
    Memorial Book of the Serbian Society Srpsko Jedinstvo: 55th Anniversary

    The Serbian-Montenegrin Benevolent Society, which was organized in Chicago in the year 1881, during its convention held on Oct. 17, 1894, decided to change the name as follows: Srpsko Jedinstvo (Serbian Unity), and since that time its activities are known under the same name.

    In 1903 Srpsko Jedinstvo was acting as a branch of the First Serbian Brotherhood Benevolent Federation of America. In 1900 it became part of the federation Sloga, which had been liquidated on February 28, 1921. Since 1921 the society Srpsko Jedinstvo was working as an independent organization. The purpose of this society is to give financial help to their members in case of sickness, accident, surgical aid and death; also to spread propaganda on national culture and unity. Its aim is also to help educate their members in American citizenship.

    The society accepts as members any Serbian or Slav, man or woman, from 218 to 40 years of age, who are healthy and of a sound mind.

    The youth organization Jedinstvo accepts any child from 2 to 18 years of age, and whose parents are of Serbian, Croatian or Slovenian extraction.

    Since 1894 the society has delivered honorary membership to the following distinguished personalities: (1) Alexandar I Obrenovich, former king of Serbia; (2) Nicholas I, Prince of Montenegro; (3) Queen Natarie, Serbia; (4) Nikola Tesla, inventor; and many others whose cultural or philanthropic activities have made them eligible for such an honorary title.

    Mr. Ivan Vuchetich, first organizer of this society and a member for 55 years, was elected as permanent honorary president.

    The Serbian-Montenegrin Benevolent Society, which was organized in Chicago in the year 1881, during its convention held on Oct. 17, 1894, decided to change the name as follows: Srpsko Jedinstvo ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, III B 2