The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Coko (Sokol) -- June 01, 1912
    Serbian Sokol in Chicago

    The open-air exercises of the Sokol, presented on May 5, were a great success. They left a deep impression of appreciation and pride in the memories of the many friends and members who attended.

    The following societies were present: "Serbian Sokol," Gary, Indiana; "Srpsko Jedinstvo" (Serbian Unity); "Srpsko Jamburashko Drushtvo" (Serbian String Society); "Srladya" (Serbia); "Srpsko Pjevacko Drushtvo" (Serbian Singing Society); "Branko Raditchevich" Society, Chicago; "C.D.D. Oblich" Singing Society, Chicago; "Serbian-American Benevolent Society;" "Coko" (Sokol) ,Chicago; "Slavia," Bohemian Sokol; "Coko" (Sokol), Bohemian Oak Park; "Croatian Sokol;" "La Speranta," Rumanian Gymnastic Society.

    The open-air exercises of the Sokol, presented on May 5, were a great success. They left a deep impression of appreciation and pride in the memories of the many friends ...

    Serbian
    II B 3, II D 1
  • Soko (Sokol) -- June 01, 1912
    Serbian Sokol in Chicago

    The open-air exercises of the Sokol, presented on May 5, were a great success. They left a deep impression of appreciation and pride in the memories of the many friends and members who attended.

    The following societies were present: "Serbian Sokol," Gary, Indiana; "Srpsko Jedinstvo" (Serbian Unity); "Srpsko Jamburashko Drushtvo" (Serbian String Society); "Srladya" (Serbia); "Srpsko Pjevacko Drushtvo" (Serbian Singing Society); "Branko Raditchevich" Society, Chicago; "D.D.D. Oblich" Singing Society, Chicago; "Serbian-American Benevolent Society"; "Soko" (Sokol), Chicago; "Slavia," Bohemian Sokol; "Soko" (Sokol), Bohemian Oak Park; "Croatian Sokol"; "La Speranta," Rumanian Gymnastic Society.

    The open-air exercises of the Sokol, presented on May 5, were a great success. They left a deep impression of appreciation and pride in the memories of the many friends ...

    Serbian
    III B 2, II D 1
  • [Association documents] -- March 10, 1935
    Memorial Book of the Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich: 30th Anniversary

    The Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich was organized in the year 1905 under the laws of the State of Illinois.

    The purpose of this society is to help their members socially, morally and financially in case of trouble, and especially in sickness. The society pays sick benefits at the rate of $1 per day; also death benefits up to $600. Their accident policy covers injured legs, hands, and almost every part of the human body. For all the above mentioned benefits members are charged only $1.75 per month.

    Besides financial help, this society is well known as the most active society in the colony in propagating culture and education among Serbians in Chicago. During the long period of its existence, the society has organized a great number of concerts, theatrical performances, dances, etc.

    2

    From 1905 to 1921 the society belonged to the former Serbian federation, Sloga. The year 1921 brought the federation Sloga into dissolution, and all of its branches, as for example the society St. George, were facing the problem of forming some other unity or working independently.

    The majority in the society of St. George advocated unity with the Serbian federation in Pittsburg. The minority decided to remain independent and has remained so up to today under the name of "Obilich."

    Only 35 members were left in Obilich after the members split, but in this case the old proverb, "Not quantity but quality is what counts," proved to be right.

    A small number of sincere and willing workers showed great activity and drew not only the sympathy of the Serbians, but also succeeded in enlarging its membership to 180 members. Today the society Obilich is 3known as the richest society in Chicago, and has a capital of $20,000.

    This society also proved the fact that Serbians and Croats can cooperate if good will and honest work prevail, because the society Obilich has a large number of Croatian members.

    A great pride and the future hope of this society is the Youth Organization, which grew rapidly not only in its membership but also in its activities.

    Obilich's youth band, choir, dramatic club, etc. are the cultural part of the Serbian colony on the North Side of Chicago.

    The Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich was organized in the year 1905 under the laws of the State of Illinois. The purpose of this society is to help their members socially, ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1
  • [Association documents] -- May 05, 1935
    Memorial Book of the Serbian Benevolent Society St. George: 25th Anniversary

    A quarter of a century ago, on February 19, 1910, a few Serbians organized the society St. George. Thirty-five members, organizers, signed the minutes of the first meeting and elected as the first president of their society Mr. Jovan Vukovich.

    During the first few years the society slowly progressed. In those dark days in the history of the World War, when the liberty of their native land was at stake, the society of St. George gave all its treasury to the Red Cross, and sent a number of volunteers to the Serbian front.

    Because people of Serbian extraction started to move their colony from Cicero, where this society originally was organized, it came as an accommodation and necessity to move the headquarters to Fowler St. After the war the membership of the society was steadily growing and today it has 125 adult and 116 children members.

    A quarter of a century ago, on February 19, 1910, a few Serbians organized the society St. George. Thirty-five members, organizers, signed the minutes of the first meeting and elected ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, II D 10
  • [Association documents] -- May 10, 1936
    Memorial Book of the Serbian Benevolent Society St. Djuradj: Tenth Anniversary

    The Serbian Benevolent Society St. Djuradj was organized April 15, 1926, as branch No. 61 of the Serbian Federation Sloboda. At the beginning the above mentioned society had only 50 charter members, whose names are still on the list of today.

    During 1927 the society also organized a youth branch. During three years of existence (1926-29), the society succeeded in increasing its membership to 150 members. Today the society's membership consists of 200 adults and 140 children. The assets of this society are valued at over $6,500. From its beginning until today the society has paid to its members $8,082 in sick benefits.

    The sick benefit consists of $10 cash per week, plus free medical service during the entire period of illness. This society has always been known 2as a very active (one) in practically all Serbian affairs in Chicago, and helped financially and morally each cultural or national enterprise.

    The Serbian church on the north side of Chicago draws especially much financial help from this society. Every church need is partially paid from this society's treasury. Here are just a few donations registered in its treasury book:

    For church flag $200
    " " building 4,000
    " " bell 1,000
    Free work for church 1,000
    Loan to church 1,000
    For Serbian monastery 500
    $7,700
    3

    Membership statistics show that the society has:

    75 members aged 16--25
    75 " " 25--35
    40 " " 35-45
    10 " " 45--55

    These statistics show that the insurance policies of this society are highly protected due to the big number of young members.

    This society is very young and compares to others; it still shows a bigger cash capital, which offers the best protection to policyholders.

    The Serbian Benevolent Society St. Djuradj was organized April 15, 1926, as branch No. 61 of the Serbian Federation Sloboda. At the beginning the above mentioned society had only 50 ...

    Serbian
    II D 1
  • Amerikanski Srbobran -- June 01, 1937
    35th Anniversary of the Serbian Society Lika and Krbava

    Thirty-five years of unselfish work on organizing people of Serbian extraction in South Chicago was celebrated on May 23rd of this year by the oldest known Serbian organization, Lika and Krbava.

    On this rare occasion hundreds of Serbians, Montenegrins, and the representives of other Slavic nations paid their tribute and homage to fifty-seven old members and pioneers who, thirty-five years ago, got the excellent idea of putting together unorganized old-timers.

    Hard work, patience, and love for their neighbors' welfare was the fundamental principle of this society. The self-preservation of those pioneers, of course, played a part in organizing this society.

    After a brilliant celebration, partially in church and outside, members and friends held a banquet in the church's hall. Dozens of speeches were 2delivered by prominent members of the Serbian colony, representatives of several societies, press and political organizations. This showed the attitude of the people toward the activities of the society Lika and Krbava.

    The general motive in these speeches was praise of the noble, self-sacrificing and energetic work done by the society in improving colony life, economically, culturally, educationally and religiously.

    In the evening the South Chicago Dramatic Club, assisted by a combined choir of a few singing societies, gave a well selected entertainment. The dance following continued until after midnight. Old and young were mixed in perfect harmony, enjoying the music, native songs, dances, games, etc.

    G. Kovacevich

    St. Louis, Mo.

    Thirty-five years of unselfish work on organizing people of Serbian extraction in South Chicago was celebrated on May 23rd of this year by the oldest known Serbian organization, Lika and ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, III B 2
  • Radnik -- June 07, 1937
    About the Consolidation of Serbian Benevolent Societies

    There is no doubt that the consolidation of Croatian benevolent societies in the Croatian Fraternal Union influenced the Serbian workers to be interested in the consolidation of Serbian benevolent societies, but the main factor was the material situation and pressure of political facts.

    There were more resolutions in this direction. Lately a society of Ohio sent to other organizations a stronger resolution, which we will bring to our readers for consideration and eventually for action.

    The resolution reads: "To all Serbian benevolent societies and organizations of America. Dear Brethren and Sisters: The situation of our Serbian benevolent associations of America is, to put it mildly, unfavorable. The great, rich insurance companies put obstacles in the way of every benevolent society, also of ours, in the form of claims to have a large reserve fund and other things.

    2

    "After the war in America, through organizations or certain persons, laws are introduced to burden the foreigner regarding his movements and work. To prohibit or limit the organization of foreigners, and to limit and censor the foreign press.

    "Immigration laws are adopted. Many bills are introduced for registration, fingerprinting and photographing of immigrant workers. These bills are before the United States Congress and may become laws at any time.

    "It can easily happen that the right to organize benevolent societies will be taken away. All such actions are directed against immigrant workers, also Serbians.

    "The divergence of our benevolent societies, caused by inimical politics of the old country, the confidence in them lost because of malversations, demand a consolidation.

    3

    "The consolidation of Srbobran (Serb Defender), Union of Freedom, of the union of conscious Serbians is possible, if all these organizations take the idea in hand and act according to the following points.

    "1. The constitution of a committee of three members for each participating organization.

    "2. That the candidates for such a committee be named by June 1st.

    "3. That the candidates be nominated at regular meetings.

    "4. Elected at the above time.

    "5. The majority of votes decides.

    "6. The committee elected has to (a) examine the standing of each organization, (b) call a convention, (c) prepare everything necessary for such a convention.

    4

    "7. That the elected committee have full freedom of action.

    "8. That the decisions of this committee be valid for each represented organization.

    "Adopted unanimously at the regular meeting on April 11, 1926, by the Society of St. George, No. 80, at Canton, Ohio.

    The coming convention of Serbian organizations must act seriously for the consolidation of all.

    There is no doubt that the consolidation of Croatian benevolent societies in the Croatian Fraternal Union influenced the Serbian workers to be interested in the consolidation of Serbian benevolent societies, ...

    Serbian
    II D 1
  • [Association documents] -- [Unknown date]
    Memorial Book Srpsko Jedinstvo: The Junior Order of the United Serbian Society

    More than half a century has passed since our struggling forefathers emigrated from the sunny Adriatic shores of our brave Fatherland to the great bountiful land of freedom, these United States.

    Little did those pioneers know at the time that the outcome of their original Obilich Pleasure Club, consisting of just a few men, was to be the present-day United Serbian Society, a strong and independent benevolent society, with a foundation as firm as the Rock of Gibraltar.

    The founders of the United Serbian Society and those who came later endured many hardships to keep up such a society of their mother tongue in a new country and a strange environment. But pride, courage and perseverance guided them to the high ideals on which they founded the United Serbian Society, and on which the building of society and its 2youth is being carried on.

    In the first years men were the only ones admitted to membership. Later on, in 1917, women were invited to join, but not until 1921 was there the thought of having any child enter the society.

    Between the years 1921 and 1930 little was done to interest the children in joining the Junior Order, but in 1930, when the first elder, Mr. Rade Govedarica, was elected, the Junior Order began having its own meetings, officers and social functions.

    Mr. Jovo Simich followed Mr. Govdarica as elder and both did all they could to enroll more members and to inspire and acquaint them with our beautiful Serbian language. For the few short years of its activity, our Junior Order has to its credit an enrollment of 106 fine, healthy 3boys and girls ranging in age from two to twenty-one years.

    The activities of the group are many and varied. Regular monthly meetings are held. Everything is done in the Serbian language. At the head of the Junior Order we have a fine, intelligent girl, Desanka I. Tarailo, as president.

    She has held this position for a number of years and has filled it extremely well. She is competent in the Serbian language and is an active and willing worker in any undertaking. She is, indeed, a credit to the Junior Order.

    Bozo R. Nogulich stands out among the boys as the most active and acts as vice-president. A short time ago he was awarded a gold pin for having 4enrolled the largest number of new members in the order.

    One of the most interesting activities created in our Junior Order is the Tamburica Orchestra known as "The Happy Mountaineers," (or) Vesels Brdjani. They happily sing and play their cares away.

    The Junior Order maintains Serbian classes every Saturday, so that its boys and girls may avail themselves of the opportunity to learn how to read and write their beautiful language. There are three groups which meet at different hours, and they are classed as to their ability. About 65 attend every week. Besides reading, writing and history, they learn national songs, games and kolos (national dance).

    They are always willing and ready with recitations and plays whenever a program for some society is needed. All of these things help them to 5understand and know about their ancestral home better than they would know otherwise.

    Sports have not been neglected either. For the past three years a baseball and basketball team have been sponsored by the Junior Order. It has been supplied with Jerseys, caps, ball and other necessary equipment besides moral support. The team has played quite regularly and has been victorious over most of the teams played. The younger boys have organized a team also and play very well for their ages.

    One of the most outstanding events in the history of the Junior Order of the United Serbian Society occurred on June 9, 1935, when the Junior Order gave a modest gift to our church in Chicago, the Holy Resurrection, at 1905 Fowler St.

    6

    The gift was the icon of St. Sava, a beautiful masterpiece which will long remain in our church as a remembrance of its children who love the church and the memory of Saint Sava. The year 1935 was celebrated as St. Sava's year, for it was the 700th anniversary of the death of this famous monk, who first instilled religion and education into the hearts of our people.

    The Junior Order rightly celebrated St. Sava's year by studying all about him at meetings and classes throughout the entire year. The climax was the dedication of the icon in the church, on June 9th.

    All the children worked hard to earn the funds to purchase this icon by means of selling tickets in a popularity contest sponsored by the Junior Order.

    And so on, the Junior Order of the United Serbian Society keeps on its 7various activities. This is all due to the efforts of the children themselves, who take interest to do these things through the cooperation and fine support given them by the present officers and other interested members of the United Serbian Society; and through the parents who allow and urge their children to such activity.

    The generosity and kindness of the Serbian National Federation and its worthy secretary, Mr. Branko Perich, cannot be surpassed. The Serbian books which they provided for the Serbian children in the Chicago community proved a great help to us also. Their method of spreading Serbian culture is indeed praiseworthy. Many thanks to all of the above mentioned.

    The goal of the Junior Order is to outnumber the membership of the United Serbian Society itself, to work loyally and conscientiously on behalf of the society and the juniors, to preserve the ideals forwarded to them by the elders; to know the beautiful traditions and 8history of Jugoslavia, never to forget the mother tongue, to be good orthodox Christians living up to the standards of Pravoslaveye as taught by the immortal Sveti Sava; to be loyal sons of Jugoslavia; to understand and respect the ideals for which its heroic men fell, as did the never-to-be-forgotten King Alexander I, and finally, as young American citizens to respect and love their adopted country, the United States, and its great President, Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    By Nada Pasovich, Elder.

    More than half a century has passed since our struggling forefathers emigrated from the sunny Adriatic shores of our brave Fatherland to the great bountiful land of freedom, these United ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, III B 2, III E, II B 2 f
  • [Association documents] -- [Unknown date]
    Memorial Book Srpsko Jedinstvo: Srpsko Jedinstvo as a Nursery of Serbian Organizations

    Being the oldest and most active Serbian society, Srpsko Jedinstvo can be called a nursery of humanitarian, benevolent and educational organizations in Chicago.

    A branch of Srpsko Jedinstvo became in 1905 the society Petar Karadjozdjevich.

    Among the members of Srpsko Jedinstvo there was organized the first singing society Branko Raditchevich, which has existed for over 30 years.

    Also Srpsko Jedinstvo organized among its member the first musical society Srbadia. Also Prosveta, a cultural and educational society, came out of Srpsko Jedinstvo. The Serbian Soko, sokol organization, is among the 2accomplishments of Srpsko Jedinstvo.

    Up to 1917, Srpsko Jedinstvo was considered as a bachelor's organization because of the majority of its members being men, but in 1919 the Women's Society was accepted and united with this society, as it is today.

    Being the oldest and most active Serbian society, Srpsko Jedinstvo can be called a nursery of humanitarian, benevolent and educational organizations in Chicago. A branch of Srpsko Jedinstvo became in ...

    Serbian
    II D 1
  • [Association documents] -- [Unknown date]
    Memorial Book Srpsko Jedinstvo: Why the Name "Srpsko Jedinstvo" Has Been Selected

    In 1878 the Chicago Serbian colony formed their first entertainment club, Obilich. In 1881 the first benevolent society, named Serbian and Montenegro Benevolent Society, was organized.

    Due to the prevailing idea that the Serbians, Herzegovinian and Montenegrin provinces must be united into one kingdom, it was found necessary to change separatistic names of existing societies to some name which would be acceptable by all Slav (Balkan) nationalities, and (which) would not suffer from future changes. So, on Oct. 17, 1894, delegates from the society Obilich and the Srpsko Montenegro Benevolent Society unanimously decided, during a meeting, to accept the new name of "United Serbian Society Jedinstvo," under which title the Illinois charter was drawn.

    In 1878 the Chicago Serbian colony formed their first entertainment club, Obilich. In 1881 the first benevolent society, named Serbian and Montenegro Benevolent Society, was organized. Due to the prevailing ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, III B 2