The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Soko (Sokol) -- May 01, 1912
    Serbian Sokol and its Ideal

    Mankind is progressing steadily in science, religion, politics, and in people's education. Ways and means, forms and ideals are different, but the fundamental structure of progress is always the same.

    New forms of education have been laid in the organization of the "Sokol," whose slogan is: "A healthy soul in a healthy body."

    This slogan is as old as mankind.

    Today, not only the "Sokol," a special organization to promote this idea, but even schools are getting interested in accepting this form of education as a standard point in their daily program.

    What the Serbian "Sokol" in America wants: (1) The Serbian "Sokol" in America, as any other similar organization, is pursuing "sokol" ideas 2to promote strength in bodies by especially designed exercises. This improved strength is by all means very important to our new generation in America, where people work under very unhealthyful conditions. The American people a long time ago recognized the priceless value of physical education through promotion of their national sports, such as base-ball, foot-ball, fighting, wrestling, etc.

    (2) The Serbian "Sokol" aims to promote democracy. They accept old and young, poor and rich, teachers and merchants, doctors and laborers. Social and economic differences are erased.

    (3) The Serbian "Sokol" wants to develop healthy men and women.

    The Bohemian "Sokol" organization through experience has been convinced that physical education is equally important for males and for females, so in the "Sokol" no differences exist between man, woman, girl or boy.

    (4)The Serbian "Sokol" wants to improve their members' intellect. This 3purpose is accomplished by organizing lectures, courses, meetings, discussions, etc.

    (5) The Serbian "Sokol" offers a disciplined education. They want to build strong characters; punctuality, patience, seriousness, etc., are promoted to the last degree.

    (6) The Serbian "Sokol" also desires to prepare their members for the eventual possibility of becoming defenders of their old and new country.

    As we can see, the ideals of the "sokol" are high and must be considered as such from any standpoint.

    The means by which these ideals are promoted are very simple and inexpensive. It is true that the "sokol" is saving much money for its members by occupying their body and mind, which keeps them away from taverns and gambling. The result of "Sokol" work cannot be easily estimated. It is very high in ideals and has many tremendous possibilities for expansion.

    Dr. Paja Radosavljevich.

    Mankind is progressing steadily in science, religion, politics, and in people's education. Ways and means, forms and ideals are different, but the fundamental structure of progress is always the same. ...

    Serbian
    II B 3, II B 2 g
  • "Serbians in Chicago," Scrapbook of D. Popovich -- September 20, 1929
    (No headline)

    A long time beforemany of us were born, our Serbian immigrants organized a colony in Chicago.

    Many of these immigrants have seen their sons and daughters married and their grandchildren born. The original immigrants are getting pretty old, and these grandchildren of theirs are growing fast. So our present world is built on the younger generation, and many of their elders have lived so long in Chicago that they may rightfully be considered old settlers.

    In some families, father, mother, sons, daughters, grandchildren, and even great-grandchildren were born in Chicago.

    This fact convinces us that our colony in Chicago is the oldest Serbian settlement in America.

    2

    Serbians have centers in all three divisions of Chicago, on the North Side, the South Side, and the West Side. Many of our people have bought their own houses and have become property-owners. All this is admirable but there is another part of the picture which we do not like.

    Serbians in Chicago lack many things. They do not have schools, recreation halls, libraries, or a place where they may gather and relax.

    All our meetings, concerts, lectures, etc. are held on rented premises.

    Our people in Chicago have a 'builders' committee. This committee has been in existence, at least on paper, for many years. We have hopes that it will soon display some sign of life and so we will continue to be patient a little longer. If the committee continues to sleep, the younger generation will ask the older: "Were you ever young?"

    A long time beforemany of us were born, our Serbian immigrants organized a colony in Chicago. Many of these immigrants have seen their sons and daughters married and their grandchildren ...

    Serbian
    III G, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, I B 3 c, I B 3 a