The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Balkan -- December 14, 1909
    Society Obilich

    Our society Obilich announced its annual ball, which will be held on Dec. 28th in Colonial Hall, at 1800 Center Avenue.

    On this occasion our Serbians will have an opportunity to see the performance of the well-known Dramatic Club in a play entitled, "The Montenegro Dream in America."

    We strongly recommend a visit to this national gathering.

    Our society Obilich announced its annual ball, which will be held on Dec. 28th in Colonial Hall, at 1800 Center Avenue. On this occasion our Serbians will have an opportunity ...

    Serbian
    II B 1 c 1
  • [Association documents] -- March 10, 1935
    Memorial Book of the Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich: 30th Anniversary

    The Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich was organized in the year 1905 under the laws of the State of Illinois.

    The purpose of this society is to help their members socially, morally and financially in case of trouble, and especially in sickness. The society pays sick benefits at the rate of $1 per day; also death benefits up to $600. Their accident policy covers injured legs, hands, and almost every part of the human body. For all the above mentioned benefits members are charged only $1.75 per month.

    Besides financial help, this society is well known as the most active society in the colony in propagating culture and education among Serbians in Chicago. During the long period of its existence, the society has organized a great number of concerts, theatrical performances, dances, etc.

    2

    From 1905 to 1921 the society belonged to the former Serbian federation, Sloga. The year 1921 brought the federation Sloga into dissolution, and all of its branches, as for example the society St. George, were facing the problem of forming some other unity or working independently.

    The majority in the society of St. George advocated unity with the Serbian federation in Pittsburg. The minority decided to remain independent and has remained so up to today under the name of "Obilich."

    Only 35 members were left in Obilich after the members split, but in this case the old proverb, "Not quantity but quality is what counts," proved to be right.

    A small number of sincere and willing workers showed great activity and drew not only the sympathy of the Serbians, but also succeeded in enlarging its membership to 180 members. Today the society Obilich is 3known as the richest society in Chicago, and has a capital of $20,000.

    This society also proved the fact that Serbians and Croats can cooperate if good will and honest work prevail, because the society Obilich has a large number of Croatian members.

    A great pride and the future hope of this society is the Youth Organization, which grew rapidly not only in its membership but also in its activities.

    Obilich's youth band, choir, dramatic club, etc. are the cultural part of the Serbian colony on the North Side of Chicago.

    The Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich was organized in the year 1905 under the laws of the State of Illinois. The purpose of this society is to help their members socially, ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1